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Welcome to "Fiverr 3.0"!


frank_d

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I agree, the platform will grow, and the changes they are making clearly show there’s a great future for it.

My projection is it will grow even more in the next 3 years.

I agree 100%.

Aside from Fiverr’s new tools, I was pleasantly surprised with how quickly the company’s officers adapted to the pandemic and moved towards a new direction.

Plus let’s not forget that even after the vaccinations and our much needed win over covid-19, the whole freelancing landscape will never be the same.

And Fiverr will keep growing because of how the global marketplace is currently reshaping.

@gamunu Yes conversion is important, it’s included in my analysis above.

But Fiverr’s funnel is much more complex than a sales funnel on your personal website.

So I wouldn’t be worrying about the exact calculation if I were you.

I’d focus on optimizing my gig to close the sale without any questions or friction.

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-check the requirements

Now that you brought that up, I have to wonder if that goes against you too? I get that message constantly and it irks me. I do not open up an order until I am ready to work on it OR if I feel there may be something missing. For some reason, I always know to look at those orders that will invariably be missing a key component I need to get the job done. I had one just last night, and sure enough, had to write to them asking for it.

So, I wonder, with this “check the requirements”, if you don’t OPEN the order and check to see if everything is there within 24 hours or whatever - if that also makes you look like you could care less about customer service?

Also, with the messages of

-the buyer is new to fiverr

There is always that “reach out and make their experience good” (or whatever it says). I wonder if I am supposed to be sending them a little greeting and thanking them for their order (before working on it!) and that I will be getting to their reading soon?

Lots to chew on. I don’t do either of the above - meaning, I do not send messages to new buyers welcoming them, I don’t check the requirements until I am ready to do their work OR unless I feel something may be missing.

Interesting.

GG

I wonder if I am supposed to be sending them a little greeting and thanking them for their order (before working on it!) and that I will be getting to their reading soon?

That’s what I started doing a while ago, and my gig is performing much better.

It doesn’t take much time: I check every new order, see if I got everything I need (I’m way too anxious not to check, anyway), and say something like “thank you for the order, I will deliver before the deadline, probably sooner”. If the buyer is new to Fiverr, I also say “welcome to Fiverr” in the same message.

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Hey everyone!

A disclaimer: The following post/article is not an official Fiverr statement. It’s a summary of my personal observations over how Fiverr works and I am sharing because I noticed that more and more sellers come here, stating that they “lost their ranking”.

This is my effort to provide them with some answers and some food for thought.

Hold up. Fiverr 3.0?

If Fiverr’s early days (the wild wild west days) was Fiverr 1.0 and we count the facelift in 2014 (I think?) as v2.0, then we quietly got v3.0 late last year.

Without an official announcement, without much fanfare, the website slowly rolled out a back end update which seems to have concluded late last year.

How do I know this?

This is a good time to remind you to read my disclaimer.

I have no way of actually knowing anything, no one from Fiverr shared insights with me either. This is just a gut feeling and tons of personal observation, from a seller obsessed with performance. (and figuring out how things work)

Ranking is no more

I started hinting about this mid-2020, then started actively talking about it.

Talking about ranking is moot, as there are no more results pages. Well technically there are, but you’ll see what I mean in a minute.

Fiverr transitioned from being a search engine like Google to being a match making service like Tinder.

It no longer serves users (buyers) with pages filled with search results, ranked according to how well they are “performing”.

Fiverr also no longer counts on buyers clicking on verticals to find what they need.

It’s all about the search function.

Fiverr’s new engine tries to match a buyer with a potential seller that will be as close to a 100% ideal match as possible, as soon as possible.

A great match is when:

A) a seller offers something relative to what the buyer is searching for

and

B) a seller has great “performance”

It’s all about reducing risk for Fiverr.

Risk that the buyer won’t find someone to hire and therefore won’t spent their money.

Or risk that the buyer will not get a great service and ask for a refund, never to return again on the platform.

What is this “performance” you keep going on about?

Here comes the good stuff.

There are two kinds of performance that Fiverr keeps track of:

A) performance as a seller (converting prospects into buyers)

B) performance as a vendor (satisfying buyers, successfully completing orders)

THAT’S IT.

Fiverr doesn’t care if you are the best designer, video editor, animator, writer, what have you.

All it cares is that you can make people spend and then making sure that said people don’t ask their money back. (And therefore stay on the platform to spend some more)

I am oversimplifying things, as the system actually keeps track of a bunch of interesting metrics when serving buyers with sellers.

Which is why searching for your gig, or your competition on Fiverr, even using incognito or clearing cookies and what not, will NEVER show you anything useful.

The new engine qualifies buyers and knows a lot about them, before serving your gig their way:

-their purchase intent

-buying history

-browsing habits (I mean on site)

-how they respond to custom offers

-when they spend

-how they spend

The list is long, and I am sure that even if I am right on some of the stuff I think I understand, there are hundreds more variables that only Fiverr’s coders know.

OK, let’s say you are right. What now?

Well just like every change in life, it is always met with resistance.

The new “engine” is here to stay apparently, since its sole purpose is making the platform more money.

What should we do?

Why are people losing their “rankings” out of the blue?

This is where I will try to sound less like a lunatic and actually try to form all the observations into some -hopefully- actionable advice.

When people start noticing that their gigs are losing impressions, or that messages stop coming in, etc, it’s usually because their performance has deteriorated.

They dropped the ball somehow.

I know it always seems like it’s out of the blue, but there are indicators.

Here are some things to keep in mind.

The new system values speed and relevance over anything else.

It’s all RELEVANT: (performance A)

So performance A (being a good closer) has everything to do with how your gig is set up.

If you still think about SEO, and keywords, and ranking, you already lost the game.

Focus on your gig’s title, don’t try to capture everyone, don’t use pretty adjectives, focus on who you want to find your gig.

You need to be focused on your niche.

Relevance is key. You need to make sure that only the people you can help will find you, and that will make Fiverr LOVE your gig.

Don’t use the same keywords as what you used as a gig title. Trust me.

Fiverr 3.0 hates that.

Your tags need to be complimentary to your title. Not repeating what you say you will do.

Again: relevance.

If your gig’s description is written with “SEO” in mind, and is “keyword-rich”, you will once again underperform. Fiverr 3.0 no longer crawls for keywords, it rewards descriptions that answer questions and help convert.

The need for SPEED: (performance B)

Fiverr 3.0 loves speed.

The quicker you can respond to inquiries the better.

The sooner you get that custom offer accepted, the better.

Other factors that may show Fiverr you are rocking it:

-Delivering fast

-Buyers accepting their delivery relatively quickly

-Not getting lots of revision requests

-Not leaving order updates unanswered for too long (the “buyer has posted an update for X amount of hours” notification)

-Delivering before the “you have 12 hours to deliver” notification

-Avoiding cancellations

-Avoiding time extensions

Oh, one more thing:

Relevance and speed are just two faces of a multi-faced die, that calculates one very important thing.

Fiverr 3.0 is all about having satisfied buyers.

The platform no longer just focuses on making revenue and having gigs purchased.

The updated engine focuses solely on having happy buyers.

Which leads me to my last point for this article, to whoever wants to hear it:

Your reviews no longer matter as much. You can keep getting all 5-star reviews, and you will still experience lulls and droughts.

Because the system no longer takes public reviews into consideration, using the same weight as Fiverr 2.0.

They still count, but not as much.

And can you blame them? The majority of sellers on the platform can be phoning it in and still get a higher than 4.7 average.

The system has too many 5-star sellers for that metric to indicate anything.

If everyone is 5-stars, then no one is 5-stars. (to paraphrase something I keep saying for TRS badges.)

So unfortunately, and maybe even people gaming the system with fake reviews had something to do with this, public reviews no longer mean as much to the platform, when it calculates how happy our buyers are.

It’s a long and complex formula, but I simplified it to this for now:

Performance A + Performance B + Buyer satisfaction = Actual seller rating

I still think that “gig rotation” is not a thing. It does exist, but it would never tank successful sellers and truly valuable gigs.

So to sum up:

-When you search for your gig and find it, that’s a skewed POV, that’s not telling you the whole story. You should stop doing that.

-When your gig is served to buyers, it’s because Fiverr actually believes you can score.

-The gigs that are also presented along your offering, are also very carefully selected based on their performance. There is no “ranking”.

-When you notice a drop in sales/enquiries/impressions, start thinking about your overall performance. More often than not, there is definitely some indicator that “told” Fiverr that you were dropping the proverbial ball.

The bad news is that this will take some getting used to and sellers are once again asked to either adapt or “perish”.

The good news is that this new system is actually a lot more forgiving than the old “SEO/rank” system. Even if you drop the ball performance wise, all it takes is just a tiny spark to get things going again.

As I write this, and gave it a quick read I understand that I may have oversimplified things, or that I haven’t spelled it out as much as I could.

Please forgive me, as I have a birthday cake to attend to. 🙂

As always I will be here to answer any questions and discuss things in detail with you all.

Thank you!

Don’t use the same keywords as what you used as a gig title. Trust me.

Fiverr 3.0 hates that.

I really think this is true!

The good news is that this new system is actually a lot more forgiving than the old “SEO/rank” system. Even if you drop the ball performance wise, all it takes is just a tiny spark to get things going again.

I wish this was true. I’ve been facing a “dry moment” here on Fiverr after receiving a 2.7 review from a very demanding and difficult buyer in February. After that experience I got few orders I successfully completed and yet my stats got even worse.

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Don’t use the same keywords as what you used as a gig title. Trust me.

Fiverr 3.0 hates that.

I really think this is true!

The good news is that this new system is actually a lot more forgiving than the old “SEO/rank” system. Even if you drop the ball performance wise, all it takes is just a tiny spark to get things going again.

I wish this was true. I’ve been facing a “dry moment” here on Fiverr after receiving a 2.7 review from a very demanding and difficult buyer in February. After that experience I got few orders I successfully completed and yet my stats got even worse.

I wish this was true. I’ve been facing a “dry moment” here on Fiverr after receiving a 2.7 review from a very demanding and difficult buyer in February. After that experience I got few orders I successfully completed and yet my stats got even worse.

As far as I can see, every situation is different.

What you said about the SSM suggesting you different keywords, because I am a writer, I have keywords like article and blog in my gig title and as keyword tags, yet I am ranked among the first if you search for that keyword.

Regarding the review thing… it matters how many orders you process. If you have 200 orders per month and you have 1-2 bad reviews, those don’t really matter that much. But if you just have 20-30 orders a month, then the review does matter a lot more. That’s why I believe the amount of orders you process every month is crucial. At least that’s what I see in my case.

If you process lots of orders, whenever you cancel it doesn’t matter that much, although it takes half a day or so to receive a new order. That is, if you already delivered other stuff you had in queue. I do agree that having orders in revision mode and stuff like that is bad, and it will have a negative impact, I saw that.

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I wish this was true. I’ve been facing a “dry moment” here on Fiverr after receiving a 2.7 review from a very demanding and difficult buyer in February. After that experience I got few orders I successfully completed and yet my stats got even worse.

As far as I can see, every situation is different.

What you said about the SSM suggesting you different keywords, because I am a writer, I have keywords like article and blog in my gig title and as keyword tags, yet I am ranked among the first if you search for that keyword.

Regarding the review thing… it matters how many orders you process. If you have 200 orders per month and you have 1-2 bad reviews, those don’t really matter that much. But if you just have 20-30 orders a month, then the review does matter a lot more. That’s why I believe the amount of orders you process every month is crucial. At least that’s what I see in my case.

If you process lots of orders, whenever you cancel it doesn’t matter that much, although it takes half a day or so to receive a new order. That is, if you already delivered other stuff you had in queue. I do agree that having orders in revision mode and stuff like that is bad, and it will have a negative impact, I saw that.

Thanks for your reply!

Yes, of course I understand that. I’m definitely not one of those who get 200 orders per month 😛 I got 29 orders in February and then really saw a decline in inquiries, messages and orders in March after that negative review. And now, I don’t know how to “get back up” again. Nothing seems to work.

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Thanks for your reply!

Yes, of course I understand that. I’m definitely not one of those who get 200 orders per month 😛 I got 29 orders in February and then really saw a decline in inquiries, messages and orders in March after that negative review. And now, I don’t know how to “get back up” again. Nothing seems to work.

Fiverr tracks these things for 60 days. So most likely things will improve. I was removed from search due to dealing with surgery and canceling a lot of orders. That was in October/early November and it took until January 10th or 15th for me to get back in search. I also had a few negative reviews aside from cancellations, from people that rushed me to deliver, despite not having the health to do so.

Obviously no one knows how this works, but I would suggest you try to optimize your gigs and wait, if you have current orders, deliver them with great reviews, and eventually the negative review will be removed.

I agree, negative reviews have an impact, if you receive a 3.3 or 2.7 star review it’s fine, but once you get under that, It does mess up with ranking. At least that was the case for me.

I have a gig where I barely get reviews, a scammer tried to get his money back saying that he will pay me half after cancellation. I didn’t cancel, I received a 1-star review from him and it’s been a month without orders on that gig.

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Fiverr tracks these things for 60 days. So most likely things will improve. I was removed from search due to dealing with surgery and canceling a lot of orders. That was in October/early November and it took until January 10th or 15th for me to get back in search. I also had a few negative reviews aside from cancellations, from people that rushed me to deliver, despite not having the health to do so.

Obviously no one knows how this works, but I would suggest you try to optimize your gigs and wait, if you have current orders, deliver them with great reviews, and eventually the negative review will be removed.

I agree, negative reviews have an impact, if you receive a 3.3 or 2.7 star review it’s fine, but once you get under that, It does mess up with ranking. At least that was the case for me.

I have a gig where I barely get reviews, a scammer tried to get his money back saying that he will pay me half after cancellation. I didn’t cancel, I received a 1-star review from him and it’s been a month without orders on that gig.

Yes! I am trying to optimize my gigs in the meantime, but I’ve heard that editing gigs can make you lose your ranking or make the gig disappear from the search engine for a while, so I’m trying not to overdo it.

Thank you so much for the helpful suggestions and comforting words, much appreciated 😊

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I wonder if I am supposed to be sending them a little greeting and thanking them for their order (before working on it!) and that I will be getting to their reading soon?

That’s what I started doing a while ago, and my gig is performing much better.

It doesn’t take much time: I check every new order, see if I got everything I need (I’m way too anxious not to check, anyway), and say something like “thank you for the order, I will deliver before the deadline, probably sooner”. If the buyer is new to Fiverr, I also say “welcome to Fiverr” in the same message.

That’s what I started doing a while ago, and my gig is performing much better.

I’m the same. Even if I’m working on something I check the order on my phone and then go back to work. It solves a lot of issues like missing instructions etc.

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That’s what I started doing a while ago, and my gig is performing much better.

I’m the same. Even if I’m working on something I check the order on my phone and then go back to work. It solves a lot of issues like missing instructions etc.

348260_2.png eoinfinnegan:

That’s what I started doing a while ago, and my gig is performing much better.

I’m the same. Even if I’m working on something I check the order on my phone and then go back to work. It solves a lot of issues like missing instructions etc.

I wish more people would actually take a second and understand how important this is.

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I would say this posts sums up everything! Great Info and never brag too much about ranking because you are competing with thousands of sellers in your niche. So in short competition is tough.

People who wish to earn more and get ranked on first page always then search for niche which has sellers in juts 100’s and I guess hardly such exist.

Better focus on skill and in free time in which you don’t get order improve and learn more.

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341284_2.png catwriter:

That’s what I started doing a while ago, and my gig is performing much better.

I’m the same. Even if I’m working on something I check the order on my phone and then go back to work. It solves a lot of issues like missing instructions etc.

I wish more people would actually take a second and understand how important this is.

I wish more people would actually take a second and understand how important this is.

I remember reading about the 5 minute rule and thinking that makes perfect sense.

If something takes less than 5 minutes, do it straight away

It has ensured my house is cleaner, my beard is properly shaped and yes, my customers get almost instant replies every time.

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341284_2.png catwriter:

That’s what I started doing a while ago, and my gig is performing much better.

I’m the same. Even if I’m working on something I check the order on my phone and then go back to work. It solves a lot of issues like missing instructions etc.

I wish more people would actually take a second and understand how important this is.

I wish more people would actually take a second and understand how important this is.

This is something I’ve been doing since the beginning. I always want to assure customers that I received the order. I was overbooked a few times and was unable to send that type of message, and a few customers started asking questions, if I got the order or not. It also leads to a friendlier experience, since the customer understands he’s not treated like an username, instead he is talking with an actual human being that cares about their inquiry/order. So I agree with everyone, sharing this type of message is very helpful. My customers always appreciate it.

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Really gold article and nice observations. Unfortunately we can only theoritize because fiverr will never show us backend. I’ll be happy to discuss few points 😛

"Focus on your gig’s title, don’t try to capture everyone, don’t use pretty adjectives, focus on who you want to find your gig."

I think adjectives maybe don’t add anything to “relevancy” but if used correctly they may help to get potential buyers click more. What I see is titles like “I will write a killer landing page for you”, “I will write attention grabbing content” seem to have more sales than average titles like “I will develop app for you”.

"The new engine qualifies buyers and knows a lot about them, before serving your gig their way:

-their purchase intent
-buying history
-browsing habits (I mean on site)
-how they respond to custom offers
-when they spend
-how they spend"

How do you know that? Its very hard to tell this without looking directly into code

Your tags need to be complimentary to your title. Not repeating what you say you will do."

That’s interesting will definitely try this.

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Really gold article and nice observations. Unfortunately we can only theoritize because fiverr will never show us backend. I’ll be happy to discuss few points 😛

"Focus on your gig’s title, don’t try to capture everyone, don’t use pretty adjectives, focus on who you want to find your gig."

I think adjectives maybe don’t add anything to “relevancy” but if used correctly they may help to get potential buyers click more. What I see is titles like “I will write a killer landing page for you”, “I will write attention grabbing content” seem to have more sales than average titles like “I will develop app for you”.

"The new engine qualifies buyers and knows a lot about them, before serving your gig their way:

-their purchase intent

-buying history

-browsing habits (I mean on site)

-how they respond to custom offers

-when they spend

-how they spend"

How do you know that? Its very hard to tell this without looking directly into code

Your tags need to be complimentary to your title. Not repeating what you say you will do."

That’s interesting will definitely try this.

Hi there @michal247 thank you for taking the time to reply.

My comment about “pretty adjectives” was mainly targeting people who just create a bunch of gigs like “I will create amazing logo” “I will make a breathtaking logo” and so on and so forth.

Your examples actually look pretty good.

As for the buyer qualification thing: It was revealed during the “promoted gigs” webinar, that Fiverr actually can now tell who’s a buyer and who is a tire kicker and predicts how they will behave.

(the feature’s product leader made the claim, not in as much detail as I present it here)

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So, I’m one of the sellers that got “struck” by this new algorithm change.

I went over everything that was said in this topic, and I agree with most. But there are some things that just don’t add up.

Let’s start with the tags.

I went through the profiles of sellers that currently have the most orders in the queue in my categories. And what did I found? That all of them use tags that are the same as the keywords they use in their titles. I understand why you’d want different tags, but in the real-word, this doesn’t seem to hold true.

Second, I agree that everything goes through an evolution, and a huge overhaul of the search algorithm was expected. But, this change seemed to rock many veteran sellers with great track records. What I noticed is that the top players in all categories remained untacked. I’m talking about the top 3-5 sellers in every category. It’s the second tier that got hit with the update. Most of us are long-term level 2 sellers, and it’s hard for us to understand what we did wrong.

I’m not saying that Fiverr is wrong. Fiverr is a private company, and they can do whatever they want. But it’s hard to understand from our point of view. We did nothing wrong, yet we all feel like we got penalized.

I’m not bitching. We will have to adapt.

But it’s hard to be optimistic, seeing how I didn’t receive a single message for the past 2 weeks. Yet, I had my record-breaking month in February.

I did notice a few things that I’ll try. I’ll play with descriptions, even though I don’t believe they do much for the ranking. Descriptions are there to convert. I will change the tags. I will change the titles.

Let’s hope for the best.

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So, I’m one of the sellers that got “struck” by this new algorithm change.

I went over everything that was said in this topic, and I agree with most. But there are some things that just don’t add up.

Let’s start with the tags.

I went through the profiles of sellers that currently have the most orders in the queue in my categories. And what did I found? That all of them use tags that are the same as the keywords they use in their titles. I understand why you’d want different tags, but in the real-word, this doesn’t seem to hold true.

Second, I agree that everything goes through an evolution, and a huge overhaul of the search algorithm was expected. But, this change seemed to rock many veteran sellers with great track records. What I noticed is that the top players in all categories remained untacked. I’m talking about the top 3-5 sellers in every category. It’s the second tier that got hit with the update. Most of us are long-term level 2 sellers, and it’s hard for us to understand what we did wrong.

I’m not saying that Fiverr is wrong. Fiverr is a private company, and they can do whatever they want. But it’s hard to understand from our point of view. We did nothing wrong, yet we all feel like we got penalized.

I’m not bitching. We will have to adapt.

But it’s hard to be optimistic, seeing how I didn’t receive a single message for the past 2 weeks. Yet, I had my record-breaking month in February.

I did notice a few things that I’ll try. I’ll play with descriptions, even though I don’t believe they do much for the ranking. Descriptions are there to convert. I will change the tags. I will change the titles.

Let’s hope for the best.

I did notice a few things that I’ll try. I’ll play with descriptions, even though I don’t believe they do much for the ranking. Descriptions are there to convert. I will change the tags. I will change the titles.

I would be cautious about changing too much too soon. The tags, titles and descriptions obviously worked well for you for a long time. The other thing you noticed is that other sellers were also knocked back in rankings. The combination of these things would make me think it’s possible that this could be a short term setback and so, by changing your content, you might affect your future rankings negatively! There was another great seller who posted a similar setback but was restored to their better ranking after a relatively short period.

There’s no definitive right or wrong here so just consider all things before deciding to make any big changes.

Just to add: I’ve had similar lulls in the past and never went too crazy on changing things unless I realized I could improve things somehow. Every time the rankings came back some way or another - I don’t check rankings anymore as they are dynamic for each user, but I know when I’m ranking by number of impressions.

There’s just no logical way that Fiverr could suddenly decide that certain keywords or phrases are no longer applicable or suitable for your category. To me anyway, radical changes should be done when they are clearly needed, not when you are shooting in the dark.

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So, I’m one of the sellers that got “struck” by this new algorithm change.

I went over everything that was said in this topic, and I agree with most. But there are some things that just don’t add up.

Let’s start with the tags.

I went through the profiles of sellers that currently have the most orders in the queue in my categories. And what did I found? That all of them use tags that are the same as the keywords they use in their titles. I understand why you’d want different tags, but in the real-word, this doesn’t seem to hold true.

Second, I agree that everything goes through an evolution, and a huge overhaul of the search algorithm was expected. But, this change seemed to rock many veteran sellers with great track records. What I noticed is that the top players in all categories remained untacked. I’m talking about the top 3-5 sellers in every category. It’s the second tier that got hit with the update. Most of us are long-term level 2 sellers, and it’s hard for us to understand what we did wrong.

I’m not saying that Fiverr is wrong. Fiverr is a private company, and they can do whatever they want. But it’s hard to understand from our point of view. We did nothing wrong, yet we all feel like we got penalized.

I’m not bitching. We will have to adapt.

But it’s hard to be optimistic, seeing how I didn’t receive a single message for the past 2 weeks. Yet, I had my record-breaking month in February.

I did notice a few things that I’ll try. I’ll play with descriptions, even though I don’t believe they do much for the ranking. Descriptions are there to convert. I will change the tags. I will change the titles.

Let’s hope for the best.

So, I’m one of the sellers that got “struck” by this new algorithm change.

You need to understand that this “new thing” is not here to smite users.

In your case you just “dropped the ball” on one possibly important metric.

What happened during your record-breaking month? How many orders did you fulfil?

Any buyers seemed agitated? Any negative reviews? Any orders went late?

Something happened that in all probability told Fiverr that you are not capable to handle any more.

I went through the profiles of sellers that currently have the most orders in the queue in my categories.

You are most likely getting a distorted view of this. Fiverr is not sending the gigs you would be seeing if you were a buyer in your niche.

Or maybe what you are seeing is your competitor’s last “record-breaking month” and they are destined to be met with the same lull immediately afterwards.

I don’t think you should change anything until you figure out what went wrong in your case.

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So, I’m one of the sellers that got “struck” by this new algorithm change.

I went over everything that was said in this topic, and I agree with most. But there are some things that just don’t add up.

Let’s start with the tags.

I went through the profiles of sellers that currently have the most orders in the queue in my categories. And what did I found? That all of them use tags that are the same as the keywords they use in their titles. I understand why you’d want different tags, but in the real-word, this doesn’t seem to hold true.

Second, I agree that everything goes through an evolution, and a huge overhaul of the search algorithm was expected. But, this change seemed to rock many veteran sellers with great track records. What I noticed is that the top players in all categories remained untacked. I’m talking about the top 3-5 sellers in every category. It’s the second tier that got hit with the update. Most of us are long-term level 2 sellers, and it’s hard for us to understand what we did wrong.

I’m not saying that Fiverr is wrong. Fiverr is a private company, and they can do whatever they want. But it’s hard to understand from our point of view. We did nothing wrong, yet we all feel like we got penalized.

I’m not bitching. We will have to adapt.

But it’s hard to be optimistic, seeing how I didn’t receive a single message for the past 2 weeks. Yet, I had my record-breaking month in February.

I did notice a few things that I’ll try. I’ll play with descriptions, even though I don’t believe they do much for the ranking. Descriptions are there to convert. I will change the tags. I will change the titles.

Let’s hope for the best.

Let’s start with the tags.

I went through the profiles of sellers that currently have the most orders in the queue in my categories. And what did I found? That all of them use tags that are the same as the keywords they use in their titles. I understand why you’d want different tags, but in the real-word, this doesn’t seem to hold true.

You could also look at the average no. of reviews for those gigs and see if they have the most/higher than average (eg. pick a certain amount that have the same keywords in the tags and title and a certain amount that don’t and compare the difference in the avg number of reviews). If there’s been a change where it’s now better not to use the same keywords in the title and tags you could only look at the gigs created more recently (eg. 2020 onwards) to check the amounts on - maybe checking gigs of the same/similar basic package price so it’s a better comparison if you don’t take many gigs into account.

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I believe the formula that you have is somewhat true, however I think the buyers you bring in should be in there somewhere. Advertising is a must. Makes it hard for the people that are working a full time job or other responsiblities to actually promote their gig and be there constantly for service on demand. This big change might be more money for Fiverr. It definitely may weed out the people that are not really trying to build up an income here.

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I believe the formula that you have is somewhat true, however I think the buyers you bring in should be in there somewhere. Advertising is a must. Makes it hard for the people that are working a full time job or other responsiblities to actually promote their gig and be there constantly for service on demand. This big change might be more money for Fiverr. It definitely may weed out the people that are not really trying to build up an income here.

Hi there @kendal1747

I don’t quite understand what it is you are saying.

however I think the buyers you bring in should be in there somewhere

What doers this mean?

I did mention that conversion is a factor and promoted gigs are also a factor.

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Hi there @kendal1747

I don’t quite understand what it is you are saying.

however I think the buyers you bring in should be in there somewhere

What doers this mean?

I did mention that conversion is a factor and promoted gigs are also a factor.

Kendall is saying that we shouldn’t rely only on fiverr bringin us clients but we should also get some clients from advertising. Which is true, still I don’t think its really in any way connected to topic where are we rather discussing how to get as much as we can from fiverr. Advertising outside it is completely different thing.

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Kendall is saying that we shouldn’t rely only on fiverr bringin us clients but we should also get some clients from advertising. Which is true, still I don’t think its really in any way connected to topic where are we rather discussing how to get as much as we can from fiverr. Advertising outside it is completely different thing.

In that case allow me to disagree. (although kudos for decoding Kendal’s reply)

I think that once a seller creates a profile on a platform like Fiverr, they should try to optimize to take advantage of said platform.

Spending money on off site ads (a feature that will be released soon by Fiverr BTW) makes very little sense IMO.

You are paying money for people to come on Fiverr where if they bounce, they will find 100s of sellers like you to choose from. (not to mention Fiverr has ways to suggest other sellers to your prospect even if they land on your gig)

If you want to advertise, then diversify. Create a personal website, and pay ads to send people there.

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In that case allow me to disagree. (although kudos for decoding Kendal’s reply)

I think that once a seller creates a profile on a platform like Fiverr, they should try to optimize to take advantage of said platform.

Spending money on off site ads (a feature that will be released soon by Fiverr BTW) makes very little sense IMO.

You are paying money for people to come on Fiverr where if they bounce, they will find 100s of sellers like you to choose from. (not to mention Fiverr has ways to suggest other sellers to your prospect even if they land on your gig)

If you want to advertise, then diversify. Create a personal website, and pay ads to send people there.

There are plenty of ways to advertise without spending money though.

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