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Thank you for taking the time to contribute @miiila

It’s true I brushed over some very important and complex things in order to try to keep this short and increase the chances of people actually reading it.

I’m not saying that speed is important in the sense that you need to deliver everything ASAP.

Replying to first messages quickly is important.

Replying to a buyer update on the order page quickly is important.

Delivering a 7-day order in 5, may be somewhat important. It’s definitely an easy way for a robot to assume you are good at what you do.

However, if you deliver in 5 days and then the buyer requests 11 revisions or cancels, that changes things completely.

So yes, things are slightly more complicated as we dive into this.

@marinapomorac your tags should be complimentary. I don’t know how you immediately jumped on something extreme.

Let me give you an example: if you used animated explainer video in your title, then use your tags to describe the service or target audience.

So you can use terms like medical, corporate, startup, or whatever else you think you can do well and that is in demand.

your tags should be complimentary.

medical, corporate, startup

This falls under “random words” to me. If you put just “medical” as tag does that mean F3 is going to combine buyer that typed whiteboard medical in search to that listing?

Wonder who is going to be the first to update their tags like this so we can see what that looks like.

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your tags should be complimentary.

medical, corporate, startup

This falls under “random words” to me. If you put just “medical” as tag does that mean F3 is going to combine buyer that typed whiteboard medical in search to that listing?

Wonder who is going to be the first to update their tags like this so we can see what that looks like.

I’m sorry you don’t see it.

Fiverr reads title+tags+description to serve your gig to the right buyers.

So Fiverr in this case would see “animated medical explainer video”.

How does this seem random to you?

If this feels gibberish to you, feel free to not use it.

I will be updating 3 of my gigs on Monday if that helps you any.

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I’m sorry you don’t see it.

Fiverr reads title+tags+description to serve your gig to the right buyers.

So Fiverr in this case would see “animated medical explainer video”.

How does this seem random to you?

If this feels gibberish to you, feel free to not use it.

I will be updating 3 of my gigs on Monday if that helps you any.

I will be updating 3 of my gigs on Monday if that helps you any.

Yes, I went to check your GIGs to see what is it under animated whiteboard to try to understand the mental perspective of this.

If this feels gibberish to you, feel free to not use it.

No, I did not say that, I just can’t grasp what to put under tags for one of my main services.

Everything is covered in the title so there is nothing more to say about the service.

For example

“I will remove background from your photo in Photoshop”

Tags: image modification, image tampering, pozadina removal, … back removal,

This will take some time to figure out.

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This make sense, but this match have failures… because in the end the buyers are humans not machine.

Is really commum that we receive messages from buyers that don’t read the GIG TITLE… and contact you thinking that you do X when you do Y. (Is crazy but this happen in all internet)

For example:

  • Sellers that write script for videos… receiving buyers that ask to edit video.

  • Or a Voice Over Seller that work the idiom A and the buyer ask for the idiom B.

In this examples the Seller never will convert. So this match need improvements, analyse more deep the variations to filter better what kind of sellers fills more closest to 100% with the buyer needs.

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I’m sorry you don’t see it.

Fiverr reads title+tags+description to serve your gig to the right buyers.

So Fiverr in this case would see “animated medical explainer video”.

How does this seem random to you?

If this feels gibberish to you, feel free to not use it.

I will be updating 3 of my gigs on Monday if that helps you any.

Fiverr reads title+tags+description to serve your gig to the right buyers.

So Fiverr in this case would see “animated medical explainer video”.

I remember something similar was mentioned a few years ago. To make your service more specialist. For example, logo design in the title, and coffeehouse as one of the tags.

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This make sense, but this match have failures… because in the end the buyers are humans not machine.

Is really commum that we receive messages from buyers that don’t read the GIG TITLE… and contact you thinking that you do X when you do Y. (Is crazy but this happen in all internet)

For example:

  • Sellers that write script for videos… receiving buyers that ask to edit video.

  • Or a Voice Over Seller that work the idiom A and the buyer ask for the idiom B.

In this examples the Seller never will convert. So this match need improvements, analyse more deep the variations to filter better what kind of sellers fills more closest to 100% with the buyer needs.

If something like this keeps happening to you, I’d suggest you editing and refining your gig until it stops.

Then if it happens one out of 25 times or so, it’s just someone who wasn’t meant for using the Internet. 🙂

On the flip side, Fiverr’s algorithm learns all the time, so it will be getting more efficient.

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This make sense, but this match have failures… because in the end the buyers are humans not machine.

Is really commum that we receive messages from buyers that don’t read the GIG TITLE… and contact you thinking that you do X when you do Y. (Is crazy but this happen in all internet)

For example:

  • Sellers that write script for videos… receiving buyers that ask to edit video.

  • Or a Voice Over Seller that work the idiom A and the buyer ask for the idiom B.

In this examples the Seller never will convert. So this match need improvements, analyse more deep the variations to filter better what kind of sellers fills more closest to 100% with the buyer needs.

Sellers that write script for videos… receiving buyers that ask to edit video.

Or to write a PHP script.

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Sellers that write script for videos… receiving buyers that ask to edit video.

Or to write a PHP script.

I still get the occasional request in a message to make an app, when I only offer promo videos for apps.

But never orders.

Tweaking my tags made less and less people message me about what I don’t offer.

Eventually I hope to completely eliminate them.

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Thanks @frank_d for sharing your observations.

I can totally agree on the part some big changes are done in Algos. Many sellers reported gig impression falling and something similar happened to one of my gigs.

Diversifying through tags is something that can surely help to target a bigger audience(I guess), also something also these lines came up while discussing recently with the Success manager.

One of my assumptions is that Sellers offering higher ticket gigs in the category and with a good track record are going to get boosted. What’s your opinion on this? @frank_d

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I still get the occasional request in a message to make an app, when I only offer promo videos for apps.

But never orders.

Tweaking my tags made less and less people message me about what I don’t offer.

Eventually I hope to completely eliminate them.

Yes this is the best example you do promo video… is clearly that the user don’t read your title or your description before contact you…

For me is the same like you… i don’t receive orders but receive wrong messages in some ocasions. I’ll start to track how often this happen to see what can be done about. Thanks for the advice.

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Thanks @frank_d for sharing your observations.

I can totally agree on the part some big changes are done in Algos. Many sellers reported gig impression falling and something similar happened to one of my gigs.

Diversifying through tags is something that can surely help to target a bigger audience(I guess), also something also these lines came up while discussing recently with the Success manager.

One of my assumptions is that Sellers offering higher ticket gigs in the category and with a good track record are going to get boosted. What’s your opinion on this? @frank_d

One of my assumptions is that Sellers offering higher ticket gigs in the category and with a good track record are going to get boosted. What’s your opinion on this?

Thank you for replying.

Well it makes sense for the algorithm to favor good performers in general.

One thing my article didn’t cover is pricing.

Pricing does play a role in your gig’s overall performance.

So an expensive gig that never converts is definitely performing worse than an average priced gig that sells.

And a lower priced gig that sells a lot, may be weighted less than said average priced gig.

In most cases Pro gigs are usually the highest priced gigs and while they don’t get boosted over regular gigs they are served more to people who the algo thinks have a better chance of spending.

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If something like this keeps happening to you, I’d suggest you editing and refining your gig until it stops.

Then if it happens one out of 25 times or so, it’s just someone who wasn’t meant for using the Internet. 🙂

On the flip side, Fiverr’s algorithm learns all the time, so it will be getting more efficient.

On the flip side, Fiverr’s algorithm learns all the time, so it will be getting more efficient.

It will be taking new current data into account all the time, though might the training of the machine learning models be more of a manual thing not a continuous, automatic daily thing? eg. if they were going to try adding a set of new variables to the model to see if that helped and there were a lot in total (eg. >100) and lots of data to train with, maybe it would take a long time to run to find the best predictors. Maybe it might be run on a system that isn’t live so it doesn’t slow the live system down.

So maybe they only update the machine learning models manually every so often like every week or month, but the data they use is more frequent.

These give some idea about their machine learning stuff:

1*m-R_BkNf1Qjr1YbyOIJY2w.png.ec03288b40052fe4454f22e38e46933b.png Medium – 22 Sep 19
0*gz5XuPZfN0wAi66I.png.98220678d56914bfc0e264b19fb4c61f.png

Feature Selection: Beyond feature importance?

In machine learning, Feature Selection is the process of choosing features that are most useful for your prediction. Although it sounds…

Reading time: 5 min read

1*m-R_BkNf1Qjr1YbyOIJY2w.png.ec03288b40052fe4454f22e38e46933b.png Medium – 23 Nov 20
1*Nw6ZpaOZv-TPcIb89E_KsQ.thumb.png.3a75e8a15cce95c53deb8148693ccc50.png

Personalizing Fiverr: From Machine Learning to User Experience

Process & insights gained from personalizing Fiverr’s banner content, showing that personalized content selection increases engagement

Reading time: 6 min read

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On the flip side, Fiverr’s algorithm learns all the time, so it will be getting more efficient.

It will be taking new current data into account all the time, though might the training of the machine learning models be more of a manual thing not a continuous, automatic daily thing? eg. if they were going to try adding a set of new variables to the model to see if that helped and there were a lot in total (eg. >100) and lots of data to train with, maybe it would take a long time to run to find the best predictors. Maybe it might be run on a system that isn’t live so it doesn’t slow the live system down.

So maybe they only update the machine learning models manually every so often like every week or month, but the data they use is more frequent.

These give some idea about their machine learning stuff:

92828c7858211b02d0d926ab7420a83a29bb5e66.pngMedium – 22 Sep 19
1ec442805aba0ce8b51abaddcffb7da8a90def52_2_690x393.png

Feature Selection: Beyond feature importance?

In machine learning, Feature Selection is the process of choosing features that are most useful for your prediction. Although it sounds…

Reading time: 5 min read

92828c7858211b02d0d926ab7420a83a29bb5e66.pngMedium – 23 Nov 20
c37e2156c14b7603d93168219478d1841cc98378_2_690x371.png

Personalizing Fiverr: From Machine Learning to User Experience

Process & insights gained from personalizing Fiverr’s banner content, showing that personalized content selection increases engagement

Reading time: 6 min read

This is definitely more than I can chew.

What I can understand and say is this:

The algorithm is based on machine learning, part of it at least.

Then there are also manual updates like new metrics, changes in weight, new meta data etc.

It’s a lot more complicated than what we all think.

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One of my assumptions is that Sellers offering higher ticket gigs in the category and with a good track record are going to get boosted. What’s your opinion on this?

Thank you for replying.

Well it makes sense for the algorithm to favor good performers in general.

One thing my article didn’t cover is pricing.

Pricing does play a role in your gig’s overall performance.

So an expensive gig that never converts is definitely performing worse than an average priced gig that sells.

And a lower priced gig that sells a lot, may be weighted less than said average priced gig.

In most cases Pro gigs are usually the highest priced gigs and while they don’t get boosted over regular gigs they are served more to people who the algo thinks have a better chance of spending.

So an expensive gig that never converts is definitely performing worse than an average priced gig that sells.

And a lower priced gig that sells a lot, may be weighted less than said average priced gig.

That really makes sense. Algos optimizing to make as much revenue for the platform.

I must say a lot goes behind the curtains. Filled a survey a few days back about the Offsite promotion of gigs, it will definitely be going to boost the platform and sellers. Considering the offsite ads going niche down the services will help surely help in conversion in the long run.

Let’s see when they are going to roll out this.

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So an expensive gig that never converts is definitely performing worse than an average priced gig that sells.

And a lower priced gig that sells a lot, may be weighted less than said average priced gig.

That really makes sense. Algos optimizing to make as much revenue for the platform.

I must say a lot goes behind the curtains. Filled a survey a few days back about the Offsite promotion of gigs, it will definitely be going to boost the platform and sellers. Considering the offsite ads going niche down the services will help surely help in conversion in the long run.

Let’s see when they are going to roll out this.

I must say a lot goes behind the curtains. Filled a survey a few days back about the Offsite promotion of gigs , it will definitely be going to boost the platform and sellers.

I got that survey too!

I forgot to mention promoted gigs.

They do play a part in this, but it’s super complicated.

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I must say a lot goes behind the curtains. Filled a survey a few days back about the Offsite promotion of gigs , it will definitely be going to boost the platform and sellers.

I got that survey too!

I forgot to mention promoted gigs.

They do play a part in this, but it’s super complicated.

I forgot to mention promoted gigs.

They do play a part in this, but it’s super complicated.

Would love to hear your take on that.

Onsite promoted gigs seems to be a little off to me. Don’t know how but they won’t boost much even after getting orders from regulars.

Giving a seller a bit more control and detailed dashboard would have helped I guess.

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I still get the occasional request in a message to make an app, when I only offer promo videos for apps.

But never orders.

Tweaking my tags made less and less people message me about what I don’t offer.

Eventually I hope to completely eliminate them.

I doubt that it will be possible to completely eliminate people messaging about something one doesn’t offer. If we take the example of someone looking for a php script messaging a script writer - the same person who’d not read a gig title, to not even mention the description, would perhaps also be the person who only types in “script” as they only think about whatever affects them personally, and they don’t even consider, or know, that something like a script writer exists. And if you have the “bad luck” that your gig shows up high for that general single search word “script”, you have them in your inbox.

I got a request to make an app once too, at first, I was really surprised, but then I remembered that the word app actually is in one of my gig descriptions, then I remembered how search sometimes works, and also what kind of people I’ve seen use Fiverr over the years, and the surprise evaporated.

Optimizing everything certainly reduces the chances of people straying into one’s gig and inbox who don’t have any business being there, but optimizing only goes so far. I’d also say that some categories, especially the more technical ones, probably suffer more from that than others.

Another reason for those strays that I know from my category is what other people do, which you don’t have any influence over - other people who offer what you offer, and offer also the thing you don’t offer, and your gig is among those people’s gigs, so they might ask you for what those people offer even if you don’t.

To express it more visually (and probably a bit fulsomely, or maybe not), if 90% of sellers in your category offer language A<>B, 70% offer several language pairs, and 50% offer “any language”, and you are one of 10% who only offers language A->B, it doesn’t matter how well you optimize, eventually there will be someone who’ll ask (or even order) a language, or a direction that you don’t offer.

But apart from wasted time, it shouldn’t be a big issue, everyone should occasionally get one of those stray buyers, so they count against one’s conversion, but others get them too, so the effect should be negligible, in the bigger picture over time.

That is, if you have optimized enough to not get a disproportionate amount of them through avoidable things like bad/mistakable wording, of course.

I do get them seldom enough to not really think about it. Now, if I could eliminate those people in my inbox who tell me they can translate any language, that would be something worth optimizing for, but I fear that’s an optimizing that Fiverr would have to do 😉


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I doubt that it will be possible to completely eliminate people messaging about something one doesn’t offer. If we take the example of someone looking for a php script messaging a script writer - the same person who’d not read a gig title, to not even mention the description, would perhaps also be the person who only types in “script” as they only think about whatever affects them personally, and they don’t even consider, or know, that something like a script writer exists. And if you have the “bad luck” that your gig shows up high for that general single search word “script”, you have them in your inbox.

I got a request to make an app once too, at first, I was really surprised, but then I remembered that the word app actually is in one of my gig descriptions, then I remembered how search sometimes works, and also what kind of people I’ve seen use Fiverr over the years, and the surprise evaporated.

Optimizing everything certainly reduces the chances of people straying into one’s gig and inbox who don’t have any business being there, but optimizing only goes so far. I’d also say that some categories, especially the more technical ones, probably suffer more from that than others.

Another reason for those strays that I know from my category is what other people do, which you don’t have any influence over - other people who offer what you offer, and offer also the thing you don’t offer, and your gig is among those people’s gigs, so they might ask you for what those people offer even if you don’t.

To express it more visually (and probably a bit fulsomely, or maybe not), if 90% of sellers in your category offer language A<>B, 70% offer several language pairs, and 50% offer “any language”, and you are one of 10% who only offers language A->B, it doesn’t matter how well you optimize, eventually there will be someone who’ll ask (or even order) a language, or a direction that you don’t offer.

But apart from wasted time, it shouldn’t be a big issue, everyone should occasionally get one of those stray buyers, so they count against one’s conversion, but others get them too, so the effect should be negligible, in the bigger picture over time.

That is, if you have optimized enough to not get a disproportionate amount of them through avoidable things like bad/mistakable wording, of course.

I do get them seldom enough to not really think about it. Now, if I could eliminate those people in my inbox who tell me they can translate any language, that would be something worth optimizing for, but I fear that’s an optimizing that Fiverr would have to do 😉


Like you said, optimizing will help reduce stray messages.

They really don’t do any harm.

What you need to fight is people ordering your gig and asking for something they thought you offered.

That will actually tank your performance.

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Like you said, optimizing will help reduce stray messages.

They really don’t do any harm.

What you need to fight is people ordering your gig and asking for something they thought you offered.

That will actually tank your performance.

Ah, I suppose, yes. I only had that happen once in all the time, that might confirm my impression that it would depend a lot on the category, or is due to a mix of optimizing and good luck perhaps. Or just good luck, who knows. The person saw the error of their ways right after ordering, I assume through my requirement page, and it happened “live”, so to speak, so at least it could be sorted quickly. Support canceled it, and I don’t think it did much. If you get that often, of course, it surely will have an effect, and also, it’s simply annoying, of course.


Actually, why I came back to the thread though was to add something else that I forgot to post above. I’m convinced that one of the things Fiverr 3.0 loves is if sellers specialize. That would be the first thing I’d recommend struggling sellers. It ties in with your points of relevancy and matching, obviously, but I think it’s worth spelling it out.

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This has been one h*ll of a good read. Well, now I think you nailed it. I see my issues. Damn. I just began gig revising… have stopped all work to revamp certain elements. Massive help, thank you!

As you say, it may not all be right but it’s certainly the most likely scenario based on a few things I have also been told by managers lately…

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It has come to my attention that forum members who are part of the seller plus program confirm that they have heard some of the stuff I mention from their success manager.

I need to clarify that what I shared is NOT knowledge I got from either the program, or the webinar.

Any overlap is purely coincidental, I assure you.

This post has been in the making since late January.

I am not breaking ToS, nor am I sharing information I am not supposed to.

I felt like the disclaimer I made on the OP would be enough, but it’s apparently not.

To forum members that are part of the seller plus program: please don’t share what your SM has told you, as it is breaking the program’s ToS.

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Hey everyone!

A disclaimer: The following post/article is not an official Fiverr statement. It’s a summary of my personal observations over how Fiverr works and I am sharing because I noticed that more and more sellers come here, stating that they “lost their ranking”.

This is my effort to provide them with some answers and some food for thought.

Hold up. Fiverr 3.0?

If Fiverr’s early days (the wild wild west days) was Fiverr 1.0 and we count the facelift in 2014 (I think?) as v2.0, then we quietly got v3.0 late last year.

Without an official announcement, without much fanfare, the website slowly rolled out a back end update which seems to have concluded late last year.

How do I know this?

This is a good time to remind you to read my disclaimer.

I have no way of actually knowing anything, no one from Fiverr shared insights with me either. This is just a gut feeling and tons of personal observation, from a seller obsessed with performance. (and figuring out how things work)

Ranking is no more

I started hinting about this mid-2020, then started actively talking about it.

Talking about ranking is moot, as there are no more results pages. Well technically there are, but you’ll see what I mean in a minute.

Fiverr transitioned from being a search engine like Google to being a match making service like Tinder.

It no longer serves users (buyers) with pages filled with search results, ranked according to how well they are “performing”.

Fiverr also no longer counts on buyers clicking on verticals to find what they need.

It’s all about the search function.

Fiverr’s new engine tries to match a buyer with a potential seller that will be as close to a 100% ideal match as possible, as soon as possible.

A great match is when:

A) a seller offers something relative to what the buyer is searching for

and

B) a seller has great “performance”

It’s all about reducing risk for Fiverr.

Risk that the buyer won’t find someone to hire and therefore won’t spent their money.

Or risk that the buyer will not get a great service and ask for a refund, never to return again on the platform.

What is this “performance” you keep going on about?

Here comes the good stuff.

There are two kinds of performance that Fiverr keeps track of:

A) performance as a seller (converting prospects into buyers)

B) performance as a vendor (satisfying buyers, successfully completing orders)

THAT’S IT.

Fiverr doesn’t care if you are the best designer, video editor, animator, writer, what have you.

All it cares is that you can make people spend and then making sure that said people don’t ask their money back. (And therefore stay on the platform to spend some more)

I am oversimplifying things, as the system actually keeps track of a bunch of interesting metrics when serving buyers with sellers.

Which is why searching for your gig, or your competition on Fiverr, even using incognito or clearing cookies and what not, will NEVER show you anything useful.

The new engine qualifies buyers and knows a lot about them, before serving your gig their way:

-their purchase intent

-buying history

-browsing habits (I mean on site)

-how they respond to custom offers

-when they spend

-how they spend

The list is long, and I am sure that even if I am right on some of the stuff I think I understand, there are hundreds more variables that only Fiverr’s coders know.

OK, let’s say you are right. What now?

Well just like every change in life, it is always met with resistance.

The new “engine” is here to stay apparently, since its sole purpose is making the platform more money.

What should we do?

Why are people losing their “rankings” out of the blue?

This is where I will try to sound less like a lunatic and actually try to form all the observations into some -hopefully- actionable advice.

When people start noticing that their gigs are losing impressions, or that messages stop coming in, etc, it’s usually because their performance has deteriorated.

They dropped the ball somehow.

I know it always seems like it’s out of the blue, but there are indicators.

Here are some things to keep in mind.

The new system values speed and relevance over anything else.

It’s all RELEVANT: (performance A)

So performance A (being a good closer) has everything to do with how your gig is set up.

If you still think about SEO, and keywords, and ranking, you already lost the game.

Focus on your gig’s title, don’t try to capture everyone, don’t use pretty adjectives, focus on who you want to find your gig.

You need to be focused on your niche.

Relevance is key. You need to make sure that only the people you can help will find you, and that will make Fiverr LOVE your gig.

Don’t use the same keywords as what you used as a gig title. Trust me.

Fiverr 3.0 hates that.

Your tags need to be complimentary to your title. Not repeating what you say you will do.

Again: relevance.

If your gig’s description is written with “SEO” in mind, and is “keyword-rich”, you will once again underperform. Fiverr 3.0 no longer crawls for keywords, it rewards descriptions that answer questions and help convert.

The need for SPEED: (performance B)

Fiverr 3.0 loves speed.

The quicker you can respond to inquiries the better.

The sooner you get that custom offer accepted, the better.

Other factors that may show Fiverr you are rocking it:

-Delivering fast

-Buyers accepting their delivery relatively quickly

-Not getting lots of revision requests

-Not leaving order updates unanswered for too long (the “buyer has posted an update for X amount of hours” notification)

-Delivering before the “you have 12 hours to deliver” notification

-Avoiding cancellations

-Avoiding time extensions

Oh, one more thing:

Relevance and speed are just two faces of a multi-faced die, that calculates one very important thing.

Fiverr 3.0 is all about having satisfied buyers.

The platform no longer just focuses on making revenue and having gigs purchased.

The updated engine focuses solely on having happy buyers.

Which leads me to my last point for this article, to whoever wants to hear it:

Your reviews no longer matter as much. You can keep getting all 5-star reviews, and you will still experience lulls and droughts.

Because the system no longer takes public reviews into consideration, using the same weight as Fiverr 2.0.

They still count, but not as much.

And can you blame them? The majority of sellers on the platform can be phoning it in and still get a higher than 4.7 average.

The system has too many 5-star sellers for that metric to indicate anything.

If everyone is 5-stars, then no one is 5-stars. (to paraphrase something I keep saying for TRS badges.)

So unfortunately, and maybe even people gaming the system with fake reviews had something to do with this, public reviews no longer mean as much to the platform, when it calculates how happy our buyers are.

It’s a long and complex formula, but I simplified it to this for now:

Performance A + Performance B + Buyer satisfaction = Actual seller rating

I still think that “gig rotation” is not a thing. It does exist, but it would never tank successful sellers and truly valuable gigs.

So to sum up:

-When you search for your gig and find it, that’s a skewed POV, that’s not telling you the whole story. You should stop doing that.

-When your gig is served to buyers, it’s because Fiverr actually believes you can score.

-The gigs that are also presented along your offering, are also very carefully selected based on their performance. There is no “ranking”.

-When you notice a drop in sales/enquiries/impressions, start thinking about your overall performance. More often than not, there is definitely some indicator that “told” Fiverr that you were dropping the proverbial ball.

The bad news is that this will take some getting used to and sellers are once again asked to either adapt or “perish”.

The good news is that this new system is actually a lot more forgiving than the old “SEO/rank” system. Even if you drop the ball performance wise, all it takes is just a tiny spark to get things going again.

As I write this, and gave it a quick read I understand that I may have oversimplified things, or that I haven’t spelled it out as much as I could.

Please forgive me, as I have a birthday cake to attend to. 🙂

As always I will be here to answer any questions and discuss things in detail with you all.

Thank you!

Regarding keywords in title and tags, we all read the "Fiverr wants the be the [big platform for physical goodies that we all know and love] of freelancing, or so I imagine, so one could speculate that what happens on that platform from a seller perspective might be interesting for those who sell on this platform too.

I often get customers with keyword-stuffed titles and bullet points for their listings on that platform of physical stuff, or let’s call the listings gigs, since we’re more familiar with cool wording on this platform (it even gets cooler with full-blown concerts instead of gigs on the forum when people use Google Translate to communicate), and, actually, hey, let’s call them bullet points tags, just for fun.

That platform itself doesn’t only officially tell people it’s not helping to repeat keywords but even that they should not repeat them.

(Many people still do keyword stuffing, usually because of one or more of the following reasons: They don’t read, they generally do read (maybe even a lot) but read up on the relevant topic five years ago and are oblivious to the fact that things change sometimes, they read but think they know better, they read too much and believe too much of what they read, and a very tiny minority may have some insider knowledge/privileges and know exactly what, why and how they are doing or not doing something.)


Then again … let me close with a quote from Fiverr from the Help pages, “Seo tricks for gig titles”:

Keywords

Using a consistent keyword in your Gig title, description and tags will help improve your search ranking on Fiverr. Additionally, creating a username with a phrase or word related to your area of expertise will reinforce your Gig to a potential buyer. Use the repetition of keywords to your advantage.

“A constistent keyword”, “repetition of keywords”, that does clash a bit, right, so maybe the two platforms aren’t that comparable, after all, or something might not yet have been updated, it does happen, or there may be more than one truth, that also does happen. Ultimately, we all need to pick our poison.


All in all, I might like this bit best, and it’s easy to remember, too, almost like a Master Yoda quote, so I’ll use that as my major take-away from this thread:

There is no “ranking”.

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