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frank_d

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Well, it’s happened again and I don’t even know what to do anymore… I’m in the exact same place as I was three months ago; I’ve had no work for a whole month, even though I finished my last job ahead of schedule and got a good review for it.

Now all of my impressions/clicks are down even though I’ve been online most of the day fairly consistantly.

The marketplace has changed drastically since I posted this, even though it’s only been a couple of months.

There are a lot more variables now in play, like: sponsored gigs, seller plus program, and a few more that are now being tested and are not yet announced.

The formula keeps getting complicated, but the premise is the same:

It’s all about the right fit, and performance is key.

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The marketplace has changed drastically since I posted this, even though it’s only been a couple of months.

There are a lot more variables now in play, like: sponsored gigs, seller plus program, and a few more that are now being tested and are not yet announced.

The formula keeps getting complicated, but the premise is the same:

It’s all about the right fit, and performance is key.

I’m in the test bunch for the new gallery tags. The webinar on it was interesting- it seems they are giving us the option of condensing our gigs by tagging our variations. Kind of how search works on Amazon.

The example they gave was on an illustration gig. They showed one illustration gig with up to 3 variations (animal/human/etc) with separate tags for each variation.

Then, when buyer is searching for “animal illustration” the gig image that is tagged with that will show for the buyer as the main image.

And the different gig image tagged with “human illustration” will show to a different buyer— but all from the same gig.

It’s kinda exciting! 😊

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I’m in the test bunch for the new gallery tags. The webinar on it was interesting- it seems they are giving us the option of condensing our gigs by tagging our variations. Kind of how search works on Amazon.

The example they gave was on an illustration gig. They showed one illustration gig with up to 3 variations (animal/human/etc) with separate tags for each variation.

Then, when buyer is searching for “animal illustration” the gig image that is tagged with that will show for the buyer as the main image.

And the different gig image tagged with “human illustration” will show to a different buyer— but all from the same gig.

It’s kinda exciting! 😊

I worked closely with Roi and he explained how this feature will be expanded and worked on after launch, and I do think that this is an exciting thing for all sellers, as it provided transparency in how matches are made.

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I made the official explainer video for this feature. 🙂

I worked closely with Roi and he explained how this feature will be expanded and worked on after launch, and I do think that this is an exciting thing for all sellers, as it provided transparency in how matches are made.

Nice! Well it looked great and was very clear!

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I made the official explainer video for this feature. 🙂

I worked closely with Roi and he explained how this feature will be expanded and worked on after launch, and I do think that this is an exciting thing for all sellers, as it provided transparency in how matches are made.

Do you know if there are plans to make it available for all/more categories, or did you mean for all sellers who are in categories that feature was launched for?

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Do you know if there are plans to make it available for all/more categories, or did you mean for all sellers who are in categories that feature was launched for?

This is a “system-wide” feature as far as I am aware of, and it drastically changes how matches are made.

So while initially the roll out will be in select categories, this will soon be available to everyone.

Essentially, if you have a tag claiming you do X, and you can also prove it via a sample, the algo will heavily favorite you, over someone who just makes the claim via SEO but hasn’t registered a relevant sample.

And then on top of that, I assume how relevant and of what quality said sample is, will also play a huge part.

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The marketplace has changed drastically since I posted this, even though it’s only been a couple of months.

There are a lot more variables now in play, like: sponsored gigs, seller plus program, and a few more that are now being tested and are not yet announced.

The formula keeps getting complicated, but the premise is the same:

It’s all about the right fit, and performance is key.

That makes complete sense Frank but my most popular gig was very successful and I haven’t got a single order from it in 4 months.

I’m going to resume looking for a “real job”, unfortunatly Fiverr is no longer my prority, I can’t live without regular work/money and it makes no sense for me to stress out over something that is almost completely out of my hands now; I can only try for so long…

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This is a “system-wide” feature as far as I am aware of, and it drastically changes how matches are made.

So while initially the roll out will be in select categories, this will soon be available to everyone.

Essentially, if you have a tag claiming you do X, and you can also prove it via a sample, the algo will heavily favorite you, over someone who just makes the claim via SEO but hasn’t registered a relevant sample.

And then on top of that, I assume how relevant and of what quality said sample is, will also play a huge part.

It says:

Gallery tagging is currently available in the following categories:

Graphics & Design

    • Illustration
    • Book Design
    • Album Cover Design
    • Social Media Design
    • Presentation Design
    • Flyer Design
    • Architecture & Interior Design > 3D Modeling & Rendering

Music & Audio

    • Session Musicians
    • Voice Over

Video & Animation

    • Product Photography

The “currently” seems to indicate they might launch it for other categories too, yes, I was just wondering whether some categories might not be considered at all for this, as from the ones listed so far, it might perhaps be limited to “visuals” and music/VO. I’m hoping not, because it would be beneficial in other categories as well. Well, wait and see, I guess. But thanks for the reply, it definitely makes sense if there’s some “verification” to check claim/sample.

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It says:

Gallery tagging is currently available in the following categories:

Graphics & Design

    • Illustration
    • Book Design
    • Album Cover Design
    • Social Media Design
    • Presentation Design
    • Flyer Design
    • Architecture & Interior Design > 3D Modeling & Rendering

Music & Audio

    • Session Musicians
    • Voice Over

Video & Animation

    • Product Photography

The “currently” seems to indicate they might launch it for other categories too, yes, I was just wondering whether some categories might not be considered at all for this, as from the ones listed so far, it might perhaps be limited to “visuals” and music/VO. I’m hoping not, because it would be beneficial in other categories as well. Well, wait and see, I guess. But thanks for the reply, it definitely makes sense if there’s some “verification” to check claim/sample.

No I don’t think there are categories that are NOT being considered at all.

It will be harder to implement on some categories but Fiverr wants this across the board.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 3/20/2021 at 11:57 PM, frank_d said:

Hey everyone!

 

890919071_frankhello.gif.af20b423ea35fb7f3f8372df69f13246.gif
frank hello600×600 2.06 MB

A disclaimer: The following post/article is not an official Fiverr statement. It’s a summary of my personal observations over how Fiverr works and I am sharing because I noticed that more and more sellers come here, stating that they “lost their ranking”.

This is my effort to provide them with some answers and some food for thought.

Hold up. Fiverr 3.0?

If Fiverr’s early days (the wild wild west days) was Fiverr 1.0 and we count the facelift in 2014 (I think?) as v2.0, then we quietly got v3.0 late last year.

Without an official announcement, without much fanfare, the website slowly rolled out a back end update which seems to have concluded late last year.

How do I know this?

This is a good time to remind you to read my disclaimer.
I have no way of actually knowing anything, no one from Fiverr shared insights with me either. This is just a gut feeling and tons of personal observation, from a seller obsessed with performance. (and figuring out how things work)

Ranking is no more

I started hinting about this mid-2020, then started actively talking about it.

Talking about ranking is moot, as there are no more results pages. Well technically there are, but you’ll see what I mean in a minute.

Fiverr transitioned from being a search engine like Google to being a match making service like Tinder.

It no longer serves users (buyers) with pages filled with search results, ranked according to how well they are “performing”.

Fiverr also no longer counts on buyers clicking on verticals to find what they need.

It’s all about the search function.

Fiverr’s new engine tries to match a buyer with a potential seller that will be as close to a 100% ideal match as possible, as soon as possible.

A great match is when:

A) a seller offers something relative to what the buyer is searching for
and
B) a seller has great “performance”

It’s all about reducing risk for Fiverr.

Risk that the buyer won’t find someone to hire and therefore won’t spent their money.

Or risk that the buyer will not get a great service and ask for a refund, never to return again on the platform.

What is this “performance” you keep going on about?

Here comes the good stuff.

There are two kinds of performance that Fiverr keeps track of:

A) performance as a seller (converting prospects into buyers)

B) performance as a vendor (satisfying buyers, successfully completing orders)

THAT’S IT.

Fiverr doesn’t care if you are the best designer, video editor, animator, writer, what have you.

All it cares is that you can make people spend and then making sure that said people don’t ask their money back. (And therefore stay on the platform to spend some more)

I am oversimplifying things, as the system actually keeps track of a bunch of interesting metrics when serving buyers with sellers.

Which is why searching for your gig, or your competition on Fiverr, even using incognito or clearing cookies and what not, will NEVER show you anything useful.

The new engine qualifies buyers and knows a lot about them, before serving your gig their way:

-their purchase intent
-buying history
-browsing habits (I mean on site)
-how they respond to custom offers
-when they spend
-how they spend

The list is long, and I am sure that even if I am right on some of the stuff I think I understand, there are hundreds more variables that only Fiverr’s coders know.

OK, let’s say you are right. What now?

Well just like every change in life, it is always met with resistance.

The new “engine” is here to stay apparently, since its sole purpose is making the platform more money.

What should we do?

Why are people losing their “rankings” out of the blue?

This is where I will try to sound less like a lunatic and actually try to form all the observations into some -hopefully- actionable advice.

When people start noticing that their gigs are losing impressions, or that messages stop coming in, etc, it’s usually because their performance has deteriorated.

They dropped the ball somehow.

I know it always seems like it’s out of the blue, but there are indicators.

Here are some things to keep in mind.

The new system values speed and relevance over anything else.

It’s all RELEVANT: (performance A)

So performance A (being a good closer) has everything to do with how your gig is set up.

If you still think about SEO, and keywords, and ranking, you already lost the game.

Focus on your gig’s title, don’t try to capture everyone, don’t use pretty adjectives, focus on who you want to find your gig.

You need to be focused on your niche.

Relevance is key. You need to make sure that only the people you can help will find you, and that will make Fiverr LOVE your gig.

Don’t use the same keywords as what you used as a gig title. Trust me.
Fiverr 3.0 hates that.

Your tags need to be complimentary to your title. Not repeating what you say you will do.

Again: relevance.

If your gig’s description is written with “SEO” in mind, and is “keyword-rich”, you will once again underperform. Fiverr 3.0 no longer crawls for keywords, it rewards descriptions that answer questions and help convert.

The need for SPEED: (performance B)

Fiverr 3.0 loves speed.

The quicker you can respond to inquiries the better.

The sooner you get that custom offer accepted, the better.

Other factors that may show Fiverr you are rocking it:

-Delivering fast
-Buyers accepting their delivery relatively quickly
-Not getting lots of revision requests
-Not leaving order updates unanswered for too long (the “buyer has posted an update for X amount of hours” notification)
-Delivering before the “you have 12 hours to deliver” notification
-Avoiding cancellations
-Avoiding time extensions

Oh, one more thing:

Relevance and speed are just two faces of a multi-faced die, that calculates one very important thing.

Fiverr 3.0 is all about having satisfied buyers.

The platform no longer just focuses on making revenue and having gigs purchased.

The updated engine focuses solely on having happy buyers.

Which leads me to my last point for this article, to whoever wants to hear it:

Your reviews no longer matter as much. You can keep getting all 5-star reviews, and you will still experience lulls and droughts.

Because the system no longer takes public reviews into consideration, using the same weight as Fiverr 2.0.

They still count, but not as much.

And can you blame them? The majority of sellers on the platform can be phoning it in and still get a higher than 4.7 average.

The system has too many 5-star sellers for that metric to indicate anything.

If everyone is 5-stars, then no one is 5-stars. (to paraphrase something I keep saying for TRS badges.)

So unfortunately, and maybe even people gaming the system with fake reviews had something to do with this, public reviews no longer mean as much to the platform, when it calculates how happy our buyers are.

It’s a long and complex formula, but I simplified it to this for now:

Performance A + Performance B + Buyer satisfaction = Actual seller rating

I still think that “gig rotation” is not a thing. It does exist, but it would never tank successful sellers and truly valuable gigs.

So to sum up:

-When you search for your gig and find it, that’s a skewed POV, that’s not telling you the whole story. You should stop doing that.

-When your gig is served to buyers, it’s because Fiverr actually believes you can score.

-The gigs that are also presented along your offering, are also very carefully selected based on their performance. There is no “ranking”.

-When you notice a drop in sales/enquiries/impressions, start thinking about your overall performance. More often than not, there is definitely some indicator that “told” Fiverr that you were dropping the proverbial ball.

The bad news is that this will take some getting used to and sellers are once again asked to either adapt or “perish”.

The good news is that this new system is actually a lot more forgiving than the old “SEO/rank” system. Even if you drop the ball performance wise, all it takes is just a tiny spark to get things going again.

As I write this, and gave it a quick read I understand that I may have oversimplified things, or that I haven’t spelled it out as much as I could.

Please forgive me, as I have a birthday cake to attend to. 🙂

As always I will be here to answer any questions and discuss things in detail with you all.

Thank you!

main_3.thumb.gif.b8d1dfc30c8f1ed55e8d3bdd8cc3be1f.gif
main_3800×800 433 KB

Thank you for your amazing tips

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4 minutes ago, maezma85 said:

I really like the new features that are being added and the visual aspect of the forum is beautiful.

Unfortunately I am at the opposite side of the spectrum. I like the gamification aspect, but for me the forum is harder to browse now, and I am not as enticed to visit it often (as I was before). I am sure it's just me (or a few of us), and I understand you can't please everyone.  I'll keep using the forum, but not as much as I used to, that's for sure. 

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Maybe it's because you got used to the old design. I used to not be very active in the forum because its interface seemed somewhat difficult to me, everything very accumulated and now the design looks cleaner and it is easier to navigate within the forum but in short, each one with their preferences. Greetings! 🙂

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8 minutes ago, donnovan86 said:

Desafortunadamente, estoy en el lado opuesto del espectro. Me gusta el aspecto de la gamificación, pero para mí el foro es más difícil de navegar ahora, y no me atrae tanto visitarlo a menudo (como antes). Estoy seguro de que soy solo yo (o algunos de nosotros), y entiendo que no puedes complacer a todos. Seguiré usando el foro, pero no tanto como solía hacerlo, eso es seguro. 

And I think that the loading speed is very important too, it is another element that I consider favorable of this new interface.

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6 hours ago, maezma85 said:

I really like the new features that are being added and the visual aspect of the forum is beautiful.

If you take a look at the first post and the discussion that followed, you will see that this topic isn't about the new forum at all.

I understand why you made the mistake, though; a couple of users felt the need to post completely unnecessary thank yous on a topic that was sitting idle for the last 4 weeks, so, without checking the first post or what's this all about, you thought it was about the forum.

Perhaps now you see why all those "thank you for your amazing tips" comments are a problem? 🙂

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On 3/20/2021 at 10:57 PM, frank_d said:

Hey everyone!

 

890919071_frankhello.gif.af20b423ea35fb7f3f8372df69f13246.gif
frank hello600×600 2.06 MB

A disclaimer: The following post/article is not an official Fiverr statement. It’s a summary of my personal observations over how Fiverr works and I am sharing because I noticed that more and more sellers come here, stating that they “lost their ranking”.

This is my effort to provide them with some answers and some food for thought.

Hold up. Fiverr 3.0?

If Fiverr’s early days (the wild wild west days) was Fiverr 1.0 and we count the facelift in 2014 (I think?) as v2.0, then we quietly got v3.0 late last year.

Without an official announcement, without much fanfare, the website slowly rolled out a back end update which seems to have concluded late last year.

How do I know this?

This is a good time to remind you to read my disclaimer.
I have no way of actually knowing anything, no one from Fiverr shared insights with me either. This is just a gut feeling and tons of personal observation, from a seller obsessed with performance. (and figuring out how things work)

Ranking is no more

I started hinting about this mid-2020, then started actively talking about it.

Talking about ranking is moot, as there are no more results pages. Well technically there are, but you’ll see what I mean in a minute.

Fiverr transitioned from being a search engine like Google to being a match making service like Tinder.

It no longer serves users (buyers) with pages filled with search results, ranked according to how well they are “performing”.

Fiverr also no longer counts on buyers clicking on verticals to find what they need.

It’s all about the search function.

Fiverr’s new engine tries to match a buyer with a potential seller that will be as close to a 100% ideal match as possible, as soon as possible.

A great match is when:

A) a seller offers something relative to what the buyer is searching for
and
B) a seller has great “performance”

It’s all about reducing risk for Fiverr.

Risk that the buyer won’t find someone to hire and therefore won’t spent their money.

Or risk that the buyer will not get a great service and ask for a refund, never to return again on the platform.

What is this “performance” you keep going on about?

Here comes the good stuff.

There are two kinds of performance that Fiverr keeps track of:

A) performance as a seller (converting prospects into buyers)

B) performance as a vendor (satisfying buyers, successfully completing orders)

THAT’S IT.

Fiverr doesn’t care if you are the best designer, video editor, animator, writer, what have you.

All it cares is that you can make people spend and then making sure that said people don’t ask their money back. (And therefore stay on the platform to spend some more)

I am oversimplifying things, as the system actually keeps track of a bunch of interesting metrics when serving buyers with sellers.

Which is why searching for your gig, or your competition on Fiverr, even using incognito or clearing cookies and what not, will NEVER show you anything useful.

The new engine qualifies buyers and knows a lot about them, before serving your gig their way:

-their purchase intent
-buying history
-browsing habits (I mean on site)
-how they respond to custom offers
-when they spend
-how they spend

The list is long, and I am sure that even if I am right on some of the stuff I think I understand, there are hundreds more variables that only Fiverr’s coders know.

OK, let’s say you are right. What now?

Well just like every change in life, it is always met with resistance.

The new “engine” is here to stay apparently, since its sole purpose is making the platform more money.

What should we do?

Why are people losing their “rankings” out of the blue?

This is where I will try to sound less like a lunatic and actually try to form all the observations into some -hopefully- actionable advice.

When people start noticing that their gigs are losing impressions, or that messages stop coming in, etc, it’s usually because their performance has deteriorated.

They dropped the ball somehow.

I know it always seems like it’s out of the blue, but there are indicators.

Here are some things to keep in mind.

The new system values speed and relevance over anything else.

It’s all RELEVANT: (performance A)

So performance A (being a good closer) has everything to do with how your gig is set up.

If you still think about SEO, and keywords, and ranking, you already lost the game.

Focus on your gig’s title, don’t try to capture everyone, don’t use pretty adjectives, focus on who you want to find your gig.

You need to be focused on your niche.

Relevance is key. You need to make sure that only the people you can help will find you, and that will make Fiverr LOVE your gig.

Don’t use the same keywords as what you used as a gig title. Trust me.
Fiverr 3.0 hates that.

Your tags need to be complimentary to your title. Not repeating what you say you will do.

Again: relevance.

If your gig’s description is written with “SEO” in mind, and is “keyword-rich”, you will once again underperform. Fiverr 3.0 no longer crawls for keywords, it rewards descriptions that answer questions and help convert.

The need for SPEED: (performance B)

Fiverr 3.0 loves speed.

The quicker you can respond to inquiries the better.

The sooner you get that custom offer accepted, the better.

Other factors that may show Fiverr you are rocking it:

-Delivering fast
-Buyers accepting their delivery relatively quickly
-Not getting lots of revision requests
-Not leaving order updates unanswered for too long (the “buyer has posted an update for X amount of hours” notification)
-Delivering before the “you have 12 hours to deliver” notification
-Avoiding cancellations
-Avoiding time extensions

Oh, one more thing:

Relevance and speed are just two faces of a multi-faced die, that calculates one very important thing.

Fiverr 3.0 is all about having satisfied buyers.

The platform no longer just focuses on making revenue and having gigs purchased.

The updated engine focuses solely on having happy buyers.

Which leads me to my last point for this article, to whoever wants to hear it:

Your reviews no longer matter as much. You can keep getting all 5-star reviews, and you will still experience lulls and droughts.

Because the system no longer takes public reviews into consideration, using the same weight as Fiverr 2.0.

They still count, but not as much.

And can you blame them? The majority of sellers on the platform can be phoning it in and still get a higher than 4.7 average.

The system has too many 5-star sellers for that metric to indicate anything.

If everyone is 5-stars, then no one is 5-stars. (to paraphrase something I keep saying for TRS badges.)

So unfortunately, and maybe even people gaming the system with fake reviews had something to do with this, public reviews no longer mean as much to the platform, when it calculates how happy our buyers are.

It’s a long and complex formula, but I simplified it to this for now:

Performance A + Performance B + Buyer satisfaction = Actual seller rating

I still think that “gig rotation” is not a thing. It does exist, but it would never tank successful sellers and truly valuable gigs.

So to sum up:

-When you search for your gig and find it, that’s a skewed POV, that’s not telling you the whole story. You should stop doing that.

-When your gig is served to buyers, it’s because Fiverr actually believes you can score.

-The gigs that are also presented along your offering, are also very carefully selected based on their performance. There is no “ranking”.

-When you notice a drop in sales/enquiries/impressions, start thinking about your overall performance. More often than not, there is definitely some indicator that “told” Fiverr that you were dropping the proverbial ball.

The bad news is that this will take some getting used to and sellers are once again asked to either adapt or “perish”.

The good news is that this new system is actually a lot more forgiving than the old “SEO/rank” system. Even if you drop the ball performance wise, all it takes is just a tiny spark to get things going again.

As I write this, and gave it a quick read I understand that I may have oversimplified things, or that I haven’t spelled it out as much as I could.

Please forgive me, as I have a birthday cake to attend to. 🙂

As always I will be here to answer any questions and discuss things in detail with you all.

Thank you!

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main_3800×800 433 KB

I read your article, and it seems to be a great piece of information that you stated. Thank you for sharing this information

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