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Using Fiver as a Full Time Job?????


yarencokun
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Hi,

I was wondering if anyone here uses Fiverr as a full time job and sole source of income. (Especially in the digital marketing category)

I'm an engineering student and want to quit my part-time job to spend more time on Fiverr. In this way, I believe that I can both market my gigs better and gain customers. Do you think this is the right decision? (I provide services especially in the fields of content marketing and SEO. Since I opened my account 1 week ago, I have not found any customers yet)

 

Happy new year to all!!!!!

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39 minutes ago, yarencokun said:

Do you think this is the right decision?

No.

That's... not a good decision, especially only after a week! You haven't made a single dollar on here but want to quit your job? 
It took me 4! years to become a full-time writer (and the only reason I did was because I lost my day job because of COVID. Taking the leap is great - but not when you are so new (especially if you are a student. Of course, if you don't need any money (because of school/scholarships and the like) focusing on STUDYING can be great, but.. not on Fiverr. 

Don't give up a stable job for an already busy field where you might never make it. Be smart. 

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And what are you basing your decision on? Do you think you’ll quit your job and fiverr suddenly will start sending work your way? Hint: no. 
 

Just for statistics: only 6% of sellers on fiverr make more than 500$ a month. And you didn’t even sell a single order but already want to quit your job and bet all your life on something non existent. 
 

It took me a year before I went part time and another year before I fully quit office job and I did that only when I was already earning more with my freelancing and I knew I was turning orders down because I didn’t have time for it. 
Do you have clients waiting in line for your services? If not then there is nothing to quit your job for, only to be a full time jobless person. 

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Thank you both for your ideas. You seem right in what you said, I'm just undecided on how much time I should spend marketing my Fiverr profile. The fact that I have many competitors in my field worried me a little. How long after you opened your account did you receive your first order?

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I would say that for many people freelancing is the main job. But not only on fiverr. Many freelancers combine work on at least 2-3 freelance websites to earn enough.

In addition, the process of fully transitioning to freelancing usually takes at least a year. And considering that the number of freelancers is growing at an incredible rate every day, it's not easy for a newbie to develop accounts.

Be patient, don't quit your day job. It will take time, efforts, and patience. You will succeed, just take it slow and easy.

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Another long-term Fiverr seller adding a vote in the "No!" column here.

Build your business steadily. It looks like you already have the skills if you're offering marketing services, so you should be able to do it over time. 

I could feed my family with Fiverr income alone, but I'm glad I don't have to. Putting all your self-employment eggs in one basket is always a bad idea, in my opinion.

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4 hours ago, yarencokun said:

Do you think this is the right decision?

Absolutely 100% NO.  Based on your comments, I assume you are young, which in and of itself is not bad, but it means you are inexperienced.  You are considering quitting what you are doing to pursue a full-time career, which is diametrically opposed to your engineering pursuits, after 1 week of experience and $0 return on investment.  And people always throw out examples like Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg as people who "threw caution to the wind and made a fortune"  However, look at the real stories of their lives.  They worked insanely hard and took calculated risks.  You are on a mostly anonymous forum, asking people for advice on your career......that alone is your answer. 

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10 hours ago, yarencokun said:

Do you think this is the right decision?

The answer from everyone is no.

Some people succeed, many do not, building a Fiverr business takes time and considerable effort.

Fiverr gives you the opportunity to test the water with nothing to lose.

Give nothing up to do that and see how you go. 🙂

 

 

 

 

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I'm going to drop this thread here, just for some more conversation to think about. 

I'm going to add: Good for you, for working your way through college. Even if it's part-time, I applaud you being able to balance the responsibilities. There's some good life-lesson stuff in figuring out how to prioritize.

That said, I'm also in agreement: Don't quit your part-time for freelancing. As an engineer, you probably know that you MUST have a solid knowledge of the basics for any project to succeed. Same for starting any business. Enthusiasm is good, but one week isn't enough experience to base a career change on.

If there's other issues at your job, like a toxic environment, that's a different matter entirely.

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21 hours ago, yarencokun said:

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone here uses Fiverr as a full time job and sole source of income. (Especially in the digital marketing category)

I'm an engineering student and want to quit my part-time job to spend more time on Fiverr. In this way, I believe that I can both market my gigs better and gain customers. Do you think this is the right decision? (I provide services especially in the fields of content marketing and SEO. Since I opened my account 1 week ago, I have not found any customers yet)

 

Happy new year to all!!!!!

well, i would say quit a job is not a wise decision. at first you utilize your time here step by step, after when you wondering that you are getting positives vibes from here (like getting orders) then you can make a decision about quit the job either you gonna make it or not!

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Posted (edited)
On 1/1/2022 at 3:59 AM, imagination7413 said:

I'm going to drop this thread here, just for some more conversation to think about. 

I'm going to add: Good for you, for working your way through college. Even if it's part-time, I applaud you being able to balance the responsibilities. There's some good life-lesson stuff in figuring out how to prioritize.

That said, I'm also in agreement: Don't quit your part-time for freelancing. As an engineer, you probably know that you MUST have a solid knowledge of the basics for any project to succeed. Same for starting any business. Enthusiasm is good, but one week isn't enough experience to base a career change on.

If there's other issues at your job, like a toxic environment, that's a different matter entirely.

Thank you, I'm checking out the link you gave me now. Unfortunately, because I live in a country that is in an economic crisis, I have to work while studying at college. I was just undecided which way I should do it.

Edited by yarencokun
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Guest santvetus

Unlikely of what others have commented on your post, I will say this:

Generating enough income per month on any online platform is very likely possible. The only occurring problem is the non-constant percentage of income per month, meaning that not every month you'll earn the same. Generating more than enough income is also possible, and it all depends solely on this:

- your devotion (primary)

- your skill, how many orders/customers you can handle and your overall effectiveness 

- your style and image that you build for yourself as a brand and its effectiveness on the market

- your marketing and advertisement

I know people that live perfectly well with Fiverr, some work on multiple platforms, and some have a crazy income of 1000$ and above. 

As for me, I deal with clients outside this platform as my main income, and I've started providing services online since the lockdowns made people less available in real life and more available in this virtual inter-net.

Some of us struggle to get few hundreds, some earn far more than expected. As I said, mind the list I gave you, and you'll be fine. 

 

Wishing you all the best,

Vetus Magus

 

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That will be dependent on multiple factors. Everyone one here is advising against it, but they seem to be missing a lot of info. I think most people are in the US, or other countries where anyone with half a brain can make 20k+ a year stocking shelves, and they don't realise that's the exception, not the rule.

For example - imagine you live in a country where the average wage you would be expected to make working a 9-5 is $100 a month. Those exist. In that case, having Fiverr be your main source of income will probably not be that bad of an idea, since it's not that hard to make more than that if you know what you're doing, and working a regular job would just be a waste of time in comparison.

For me it boils down to this:

1) How much can you realistically expect to make here on average (accounting for down months, i.e. not living pay check to paycheck - I can have months where I sell zero, since I have more than enough money set aside to last me over a year without earnings, and that was all accumulated via working here).

2) How much you can realistically expect to make with a 9-5 job.

If 1 > 2, then yes, it's not a bad idea. If not, then it probably is.

Edited by visualstudios
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15 minutes ago, visualstudios said:

That will be dependent on multiple factors. Everyone one here is advising against it, but they seem to be missing a lot of info. I think most people are in the US, or other countries where anyone with half a brain can make 20k+ a year stocking shelves, and they don't realise that's the exception, not the rule.

For example - imagine you live in a country where the average wage you would be expected to make working a 9-5 is $100 a month. Those exist. In that case, having Fiverr be your main source of income will probably not be that bad of an idea, since it's not that hard to make more than that if you know what you're doing, and working a regular job would just be a waste of time in comparison.

For me it boils down to this:

1) How much can you realistically expect to make here on average (accounting for down months, i.e. not living pay check to paycheck - I can have months where I sell zero, since I have more than enough money set aside to last me over a year without earnings, and that was all accumulated via working here).

2) How much you can realistically expect to make with a 9-5 job.

If 1 > 2, then yes, it's not a bad idea. If not, then it probably is.

Exactly!

I live in Turkey, and the Turkish lira lost almost 100% of its value in 2021 due to the economic crisis. Even a few hundred dollars a night from Fiverr will allow me to earn more than engineers living in this country and working 9-5. It is a great advantage for me to speak English and have digital skills. I question how I should use this advantage.

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I'd also say no, unless you have a couple years' of income saved up to support your new career. It was 4 months before I started earning money on Fiverr. I've never made enough for it to be a full-time salary. It's great for the occasional extra income though, so I can buy some cute cat things.

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