Jump to content

After 4 hours Chatting order not done


Recommended Posts

Was it 4 hours because the client’s replies were very slow or did you both go off-topic? In the first case, there’s not much to say. It happens to find clients like that!

While doing good customer service is fundamental, you should not forget you’re here to work and your time is valuable. When you feel like the conversation is diverting, remember to take the reins and try to conclude the transaction (always in the most professional and respectful way possible). Either you get an order, or you can move on to your next client 😉

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was it 4 hours because the client’s replies were very slow or did you both go off-topic? In the first case, there’s not much to say. It happens to find clients like that!

While doing good customer service is fundamental, you should not forget you’re here to work and your time is valuable. When you feel like the conversation is diverting, remember to take the reins and try to conclude the transaction (always in the most professional and respectful way possible). Either you get an order, or you can move on to your next client 😉

I am a new seller at Fiverr so too much time expense for this buyer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One day a buyer also chatting with me two hours but he did not gave me that order 😥

Never do that. Close the deal in a few minutes or say goodbye and don’t do it.

Even if you got the job, that’s two hours of chatting you don’t get paid for. Why would you do that? And no competent buyer would take that long.

In the corporate world jobs that cost many, many thousands of dollars don’t even have that negotiation. It isn’t necessary at all.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Never do that. Close the deal in a few minutes or say goodbye and don’t do it.

Even if you got the job, that’s two hours of chatting you don’t get paid for. Why would you do that? And no competent buyer would take that long.

In the corporate world jobs that cost many, many thousands of dollars don’t even have that negotiation. It isn’t necessary at all.

That’s not true. Sometimes I’m negotiating for weeks. It will depend on your pricing and what you do, how long it takes for them to go to their supervisors or whatever to get approval, etc.

I very rarely close a deal in a few minutes. I don’t even want to - I want to know as much as possible about the project and client before closing anything. And that takes more than a few minutes. And I do get paid for it - that’s baked into the price I charge. The ones I get pay for all the ones I don’t.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That’s not true. Sometimes I’m negotiating for weeks. It will depend on your pricing and what you do, how long it takes for them to go to their supervisors or whatever to get approval, etc.

I very rarely close a deal in a few minutes. I don’t even want to - I want to know as much as possible about the project and client before closing anything. And that takes more than a few minutes. And I do get paid for it - that’s baked into the price I charge. The ones I get pay for all the ones I don’t.

That’s back and forth negotiation over a time period, not a conversation in one sitting.

He’s talking about a conversation that was two hours’ long.

I’m talking about the time you actually spend on the negotiation, not the time it takes to close the deal. Going back and forth to clarify things and actually sitting at your computer conversing for two hours are very different things.

Unless you had a conversation with him 24/7 for all those weeks, that is a different scenario.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That’s back and forth negotiation over a time period, not a conversation in one sitting.

He’s talking about a conversation that was two hours’ long.

I’m talking about the time you actually spend on the negotiation, not the time it takes to close the deal. Going back and forth to clarify things and actually sitting at your computer conversing for two hours are very different things.

Unless you had a conversation with him 24/7 for all those weeks, that is a different scenario.

If he means talking for 2 or 4 hours about stuff that has nothing to do with the with the gig/project, then of course it doesn’t make sense. Specially if the buyer is asking stuff like “how is it done”, etc. Fiverr should have automatic “consulting gigs” that can’t be rated. Would be great to send to those time wasters who want to know how it’s done and don’t want to pay for it. I would like to charge for the conversation, but as it stands there’s no good way to do it. If you try, you run an extremely high risk of getting a bad review since “he didn’t even do any work, just chat!”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If he means talking for 2 or 4 hours about stuff that has nothing to do with the with the gig/project, then of course it doesn’t make sense. Specially if the buyer is asking stuff like “how is it done”, etc. Fiverr should have automatic “consulting gigs” that can’t be rated. Would be great to send to those time wasters who want to know how it’s done and don’t want to pay for it. I would like to charge for the conversation, but as it stands there’s no good way to do it. If you try, you run an extremely high risk of getting a bad review since “he didn’t even do any work, just chat!”

No he’s talking about negotiating the actual order.

You don’t take a two hour sitting to negotiate an order that may or may not happen and even if it fors, you aren’t getting paid to negotiate. Going back and forth to clarify things is one thing. Actually taking two hours out of your day to chat with someone is another.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No he’s talking about negotiating the actual order.

You don’t take a two hour sitting to negotiate an order that may or may not happen and even if it fors, you aren’t getting paid to negotiate. Going back and forth to clarify things is one thing. Actually taking two hours out of your day to chat with someone is another.

Depends on what you mean by negotiating, and depends on the price. I’ll gladly take 2 hours of my day to “negotiate” if I can push a 1k order to 2 or 3k - i’m making 1k an hour in that case. And sometimes I can.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends on what you mean by negotiating, and depends on the price. I’ll gladly take 2 hours of my day to “negotiate” if I can push a 1k order to 2 or 3k - i’m making 1k an hour in that case. And sometimes I can.

I think we both know this seller isn’t negotiating an order of that price or even close.

Both of the sellers in this thread with this complaint are charging in and around $5

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think we both know this seller isn’t negotiating an order of that price or even close.

Both of the sellers in this thread with this complaint are charging in and around $5

Sure, I’m just saying that generalising is difficult, because everyone has a different price. Maybe that seller is happy making an extra $5 an hour, a lot of them are - in that case, spending 2 hours to raise the price by $10 is already worth it. Different people have different prices and different valuation on their time. I’m not going to say someone is “wrong” for charging $5 an hour… if it works for them, it works for them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never negotiate the terms of an order any more than 4 or 5 messages back and forth, but maybe that’s because my line of work is really straightforward. They send me a script, I record it, end of. If they don’t understand what they’re ordering after a few messages that is a red flag to me. Again, could be a difference in the line of work though.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure, I’m just saying that generalising is difficult, because everyone has a different price. Maybe that seller is happy making an extra $5 an hour, a lot of them are - in that case, spending 2 hours to raise the price by $10 is already worth it. Different people have different prices and different valuation on their time. I’m not going to say someone is “wrong” for charging $5 an hour… if it works for them, it works for them.

And that’s fine.

But the reality is that most buyers who would take two hours out of a seller’s day to negotiate something worth so little is probably going to be a nightmare and there is a good chance they’re leading the person on.

Scammers and pranksters and unscrupulous business people are drawn to people they can push over.

These sellers are coming to.the forum to vent about it so it’s safe to say they want to avoid this issue. So I’m telling them how.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And that’s fine.

But the reality is that most buyers who would take two hours out of a seller’s day to negotiate something worth so little is probably going to be a nightmare and there is a good chance they’re leading the person on.

Scammers and pranksters and unscrupulous business people are drawn to people they can push over.

These sellers are coming to.the forum to vent about it so it’s safe to say they want to avoid this issue. So I’m telling them how.

Yes, that’s also a good point. Even if the seller is happy making $5 an hour talking, a good buyer probably won’t be. But hey, people are free to do what they think it’s best. He got burned once. He’ll learn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That’s not true. Sometimes I’m negotiating for weeks. It will depend on your pricing and what you do, how long it takes for them to go to their supervisors or whatever to get approval, etc.

I very rarely close a deal in a few minutes. I don’t even want to - I want to know as much as possible about the project and client before closing anything. And that takes more than a few minutes. And I do get paid for it - that’s baked into the price I charge. The ones I get pay for all the ones I don’t.

I very rarely close a deal in a few minutes

It depends on the order price.

You work with big orders. And I have the same approach when it comes for long, big projects that have high price. I want to know details upfront and what I’m getting myself into and if me and buyer have the same understanding.

However for smaller orders it shouldn’t take long to close a deal especially if it’s something simple for 5$

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I very rarely close a deal in a few minutes

It depends on the order price.

You work with big orders. And I have the same approach when it comes for long, big projects that have high price. I want to know details upfront and what I’m getting myself into and if me and buyer have the same understanding.

However for smaller orders it shouldn’t take long to close a deal especially if it’s something simple for 5$

Yes, of course - but then again what is a big and small order is also relative. For some people, a $50 order is big. For others, not so much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, of course - but then again what is a big and small order is also relative. For some people, a $50 order is big. For others, not so much.

It’s probably not so relative to the buyer… And that type of buyer knows they can push over people who have a lower cost of living and who make more on the exchange.

Even if the person has a lower cost of living and they make more on the exchange rate, exploitation is exploitation.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My solution:
Three monitors. One has Chrome in it, you guys and girls, my kpop blasting, and Gmail. The mid, main monitor is work and work only. So, if I am writing a book, Word or Excel, drawing, Illustrator or Designer, that is on the main monitor. Monitor on the right is for the research if I am writing a book, or for sketches and mental map if I am drawing.
Right now I am talking to you and writing a book about Maritime law. And if the buyer pops out in inbox I talk, respond, and continue to work… so even if I am talking with a potential buyer for 12 hours I lose nothing since while he types his response I do my other stuff.

440918687_Oldofficesetup.thumb.jpg.737a09e6c8809d9820a1753b28631b59.jpg
Old office setup1152×864 799 KB

I can’t find a photo of my today’s set up but is the same, just larger monitors (a lot) :D. This is from 2015.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My solution:

Three monitors. One has Chrome in it, you guys and girls, my kpop blasting, and Gmail. The mid, main monitor is work and work only. So, if I am writing a book, Word or Excel, drawing, Illustrator or Designer, that is on the main monitor. Monitor on the right is for the research if I am writing a book, or for sketches and mental map if I am drawing.

Right now I am talking to you and writing a book about Maritime law. And if the buyer pops out in inbox I talk, respond, and continue to work… so even if I am talking with a potential buyer for 12 hours I lose nothing since while he types his response I do my other stuff.

I can’t find a photo of my today’s set up but is the same, just larger monitors (a lot) :D. This is from 2015.

Your taste in wallpapers is quite suspicious.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m late to the party on this one and haven’t got too much to add over what’s been said already.

But I will say listen to your gut instinct. Did it feel right or wrong when you were taking part in that four hour message exchange? Four hours is half a working day. That’s 10% of the average working week. Without rubbing salt in, it’s a long time.

If you were working towards the possibility of a huge order, and the potential buyer is asking appropriate questions (giving all the right buying signals), then sure, invest some time and explore it. After all, you win some and you lose some in sales.

But if the order was only ever going to be for $5 / $10 / $50, I would politely suggest that your gut instinct should have kicked in after 10 minutes or so, and you should have closed the sale or brought the conversation to an end and moved on. A reasonable seller will be perfectly understanding if you say something like “We’ve been chatting for 10 minutes now. Would you like me to take on the job for you?”.

After exchanging some pleasantries, there’s nothing wrong with asking what the client’s budget is. In fact it is very important to establish this quite early on as it enables you and the potential buyer to establish if your ideas are compatible.

Taking a fictional example, a buyer might think his or her $100 is going to buy 10 unique illustrations for a book, but in reality as a seller you wouldn’t get out of bed for anything less than $150 for just a single illustration. In other words, you’re very unlikely to ever agree on a deal as your ideas and budgets are so far apart. If you establish that early on, then you don’t waste your valuable time and you can say goodbye. It’s a rookie sales mistake not to ask for the budget very early on in the chat.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...