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yannisenglish

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  1. I've found that sending a template response that links to a published portfolio greatly reduces my stress and frustration with such Buyers. At the same time, it ensures that legit prospects don't fly under the radar. As a blog writer, I link to sites that have credited me for my work. I guess VOs could put together a YouTube channel or something to that effect.
  2. More like a patient spouse/sounding board 😄 I try to keep the big picture in view, really. I could easily scream bloody murder and end up being the "bad guy". Or I can just copy paste the same response and decline their cancellation request until they're blue in the face or CS steps in.
  3. No, I wasn't and I don't see how I could have been. I had solid evidence that I did the work to their specifications. The Buyer wasn't giving me actual feedback to correct the work nor requested any revisions. Despite their "outrage" and drama I still communicated professionally with them and never once resorted to getting emotional myself.
  4. The answer effectively comes down to what is more important to you at this stage: the time you spent working on the project or how you look to new buyers? Like you said, a bad review can look proportionately worse when you have a handful of good ones. On the other hand, if you worked long hours to do the best possible job you could, then you might want to see a return on that investment. That all being said, some buyers are indeed trying to get free stuff and scam. Standing your ground and showing CS that you did meet the Buyer's expectations with solid evidence could lead to a cancellation and the platform giving you the money anyway. This happened to me the one time I was being scammed. Granted, it was for a pittance of $15.
  5. Mixed experience on my part. I didn't see much of a difference in order volume. However, it did lead to me being discovered by a few buyers who are now regulars. Of course, this could vary from one market to another. What I suggest is that you make sure your packages and gig description are as tight as possible. From my limited experience, I tended to get a lot more Buyers from Promoted gigs that just placed orders without having a chat with me beforehand.
  6. I agree. The way I see it, adding such a stipulation cuts down rather than eliminates the number of quick buys that lead to cancellations. It's perfectly fine to want to use the platform as intended. However, we can't forget that some Buyers either don't read or don't understand gig descriptions no matter how much effort we put into making them clear.
  7. Good on you! Can't recommend quitting social media enough. I've been a much happier person ever since I got rid of my Twitter and Instagram accounts. I deleted the Reddit app as well so I don't get tempted to go in and scroll. All the noise, grandstanding, bickering and showing off ended up being way too much. The worst bit was seeing posts from certain friends who were constantly yelling about one injustice or another. Don't get me wrong, wanting good in the world is nice and all but I don't need it in my face every other tweet.
  8. Don't paint us all with the same brush 🙂 While I don't "get my panties in a wad", I find it a lot more efficient to have that initial discussion. A lot of the time, Buyers are grateful for reaching out before money is put down. If someone just puts in an order and their requirements are clear then it's all peachy. Else, a chat is going to be had to iron out the details and sometimes that leads to delays.
  9. One drop in your metrics isn't automatically going to send you to the back of search results. Let's get real here for a moment. Freelance work isn't always going to end in positive outcomes. There are too many variables that can ultimately lead to a Buyer cancelling an order, even if you do everything right. There's no way to get 100% on all metrics and 5-star reviews across the board forever. The response to a review isn't meant for the current buyer. It's there to show future buyers how you handle negative feedback. If your response is defensive and accusatory, then future buyers will take note of that. If you respond in a way that shows you are willing to improve or that you followed your agreement and are willing to work it out with the reviewer in a professional manner, then that's a positive look for you. And here's a good thought experiment: if a buyer sees a just a few negative reviews in a sea of positive ones but still think you won't do a good job, then do you really want to work with such a buyer?
  10. On a freelancing platform that makes it clear its primary language is English, yes it's mandatory. It's called "meeting expectations". When Buyers enter this marketplace, they expect people who can communicate clearly and effectively. Notice that I'm not saying fluently. Clear and effective communication isn't about flawless language skills. It's not even about "fancy" words. There are so many people on this platform I would bet are relying on translation platforms to do their communication. That's a surefire way to not be clear and effective. When you manage to clearly and effectively communicate, you instantly get more and better business. This is because your clients don't have to work harder in their brains to figure out what you're talking about. It's called "cognitive load". The poorer your language skills are, the more thinking your client needs to do. When your client needs to do more thinking, your value proposition drops because they have to spend more time figuring out what you are saying. As a language teacher, if I had one piece of advice to give non-English speakers, it would be to learn the parts of English that are related to doing work as a freelancer. Also, it's important to learn a few cross-cultural communication mistakes to avoid (ie. calling someone "bro" in a professional context).
  11. Unfortunately, this is one of those cases where seeing things from the platform's perspective can go a long way. It's natural for Fiverr to want Buyers to have a good experience on the platform. If Sellers aren't encouraged (or strong-armed) to respond and take on orders, then people won't want to spend their money here. Yes, it's a struggle to get your gig to appear on searches but it makes sense for Fiverr to put those who do actively use the platform forward, right? 🙂 If you are interested in continuing to receive business from Fiverr or any platform, you need to have your eye on notifications. My wife has had much better success on another platform but, like you, she kept her Fiverr gigs active. After missing out on a few messages, her account has plummeted so she's had to pause her gigs. She's concluded that for her it doesn't make sense to multitask across platforms. Some people manage to make it work, though. It all depends on your current working paradigm. If you are doing freelance full-time, it may be worth putting in the effort to grow accounts on multiple platforms when you find a lull in your incoming orders. These are my 2 cents. Not trying to sound condescending but if I did, feel free to yell at me 🙂
  12. Depends if the number of big orders far outweighs the smaller ones. It's proportionate and we don't know that data.
  13. Let's not assume what makes or doesn't make Fiverr money. Fiverr is till widely known as the place where you can get things done in a wide variety of price ranges. For better or for worse, people are still looking for cheaper alternatives and someone is always going to try to fill that void.
  14. I'd be interested in joining the Seller Plus program
  15. $250 per month plus the 20% is well over the amount someone would need to pay to set up their own shop. Even if it is on a sliding scale, it would also effectively eliminate part-timers like myself who may likely never be able to bill higher than a certain rate.
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