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Four "secrets" I've learned on Fiverr


jeremylunnen
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Really appreciate the advice! As you said, these tips can be applied to pretty much every niche on here. I’ve been interested in doing voice work for video games, and I know that I’ll really need to follow your first step! I don’t have much experience with voice overs, but I’m going to learn as much as I can and take it easy when I begin. Thanks!

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I like a lot your point 3. And wow, if two of your clients make up to 50% of your business, they surely deserve VIP status.

Just (for your own sake) don’t tell them! They could be very nice and decent people, but if they would find out you depend so much on them, you never know…

Looking back, there could be a life lesson here, in what you said. How many of us failed to reward those who actually helped us a lot? Busy with …“the $5 gigs” for the mob 😉

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how you have managed to reach becoming a Level 2 Seller bypassing the Community Forum?

A lot of people don’t use the forum to become successful 😉 it’s all about tour mindset and determination. I spent 3 years on fiver and was long level 2 seller before I joined this forum.

That’s nice to know.

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Make it easy for your customers to do business with you. I gotta say it… some of the Fiverr gigs I see are so specific and full of “legalese” I wouldn’t want to purchase them

Though voice over gigs normally have “legalise” like “commercial rights” and “full broadcast rights” already as options in the gig. With a VO gig, unlike some other services, you also won’t get buyers asking for things that would be an added cost for you if you provided them (like them asking for costly fonts or maybe costly plugins/templates or something to be used) so things like those need to be specified where relevant otherwise sellers could make a big loss on orders (or other things where the buyers need to know about various rights). The help option gives them more info on the commercial/full broadcast rights options for VO gigs (though what’s shown in those small help boxes might not always be clear enough for all buyers).

So, depending on the service, “legalise” might be needed to protect you from loss etc. (maybe cancellations too) and to make sure all orders are complaint with the terms of service and so the buyers know what rights they’re getting etc.

Thanks for sharing a helpful tips.

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Thanks for the valuable suggestions. I will surely follow them to have a great 2020. Personally, I also feel that you must be very patience with your customers. Once you take a job you must do everything possible to make sure the client is satisfied.

No that is how you get exploited.

You fulfill the job. Make sure you are on the same page and always do your best, but you shouldn’t go to the ends of the earth to satisfy a client. You aren’t their slave and shouldn’t do things simply because that would satisfy a client. Only do things if the client paid for them.

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No that is how you get exploited.

You fulfill the job. Make sure you are on the same page and always do your best, but you shouldn’t go to the ends of the earth to satisfy a client. You aren’t their slave and shouldn’t do things simply because that would satisfy a client. Only do things if the client paid for them.

True, I meant doing everything to satisfy within the scope of the work. I agree we must not entertain any unreasonable requests from their side.

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Well said! Very inspiring post. Have to agree with the “be cheap”. Build up your ratings and do the “cheap” stuff, sure your not making a boat load of cash, but it’s great EXPERIENCE. Doing hundreds of little projects will make you better in the long run.

Awesome post!

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Well said! Very inspiring post. Have to agree with the “be cheap”. Build up your ratings and do the “cheap” stuff, sure your not making a boat load of cash, but it’s great EXPERIENCE. Doing hundreds of little projects will make you better in the long run.

Awesome post!

“be cheap” doesn’t always work the way we expect…

last night I made best possible offers to two buyer requests, with $5 symbolic gigs just to increase my portfolio. I’m sure I made them great offers. But maybe I looked desperate or I don’t know what was in their mind :), because they both cancelled quickly my requests.

I used to deal with contracts of $10k+ in my life, and never expected you get such a reception when you offer to do something almost for free. lesson learnt 🙂

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The four tip “Don’t be afraid to say “No””, is very helpful, I have a bad experience trying to retain a bad buyer, the best solution was to tell him “no, thanks” at the first signal.

the best solution was to tell him “no, thanks” at the first signal.

They become enraged at the rejection. They go from bad to worse.

We have to stay polite of course and they know that.

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Just out of interest, I was asked by a buyer a short while ago to do a job for $5 with no commercial license or broadcast fees to “keep the costs down” (for that read, “ensure he maximises his own profits.”) When I refused he told me that there are plenty of sellers on Fiverr that do not “demand” extras and that he’s go elsewhere. I cheerfully waved him off, but it grates when people under value their work.

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Just out of interest, I was asked by a buyer a short while ago to do a job for $5 with no commercial license or broadcast fees to “keep the costs down” (for that read, “ensure he maximises his own profits.”) When I refused he told me that there are plenty of sellers on Fiverr that do not “demand” extras and that he’s go elsewhere. I cheerfully waved him off, but it grates when people under value their work.

Yeah, you did well.

However, it also annoys me the way certain fields price things. Voice over is a clear example.

The voice actor spends the exact amount of time and effort regardless of personal/broadcast use. Why is one more expensive than the other? I make video, and I don’t charge more or less for where the video is going to be used. I charge more or less based on how much money the client has.

I really don’t get the idea of literally reading words for 5 minutes and charging 10 bucks, but “if you want to put it on youtube, I’ll read the same words for the same 5 minutes and charge you 100 instead”.

Like… not gonna happen. I think all prices should have rights included. It doesn’t make sense for me to buy anything for which I don’t own the rights, so why would that even be an option? Why does the V/O actor care where the audio ends up, if not for price gouging reasons? It makes literally no difference to them. And if it’s just because he feels 10 bucks for 5 minutes is too little money for the work, then just charge more outright. It’s scummy.

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Yeah, you did well.

However, it also annoys me the way certain fields price things. Voice over is a clear example.

The voice actor spends the exact amount of time and effort regardless of personal/broadcast use. Why is one more expensive than the other? I make video, and I don’t charge more or less for where the video is going to be used. I charge more or less based on how much money the client has.

I really don’t get the idea of literally reading words for 5 minutes and charging 10 bucks, but “if you want to put it on youtube, I’ll read the same words for the same 5 minutes and charge you 100 instead”.

Like… not gonna happen. I think all prices should have rights included. It doesn’t make sense for me to buy anything for which I don’t own the rights, so why would that even be an option? Why does the V/O actor care where the audio ends up, if not for price gouging reasons? It makes literally no difference to them. And if it’s just because he feels 10 bucks for 5 minutes is too little money for the work, then just charge more outright. It’s scummy.

I really don’t get the idea of literally reading words for 5 minutes and charging 10 bucks, but “if you want to put it on youtube, I’ll read the same words for the same 5 minutes and charge you 100 instead”.

It’s just how that field charges for things, it’s standard.

You pay one fee for the performance and the second fee for commercial use of the performance.

Actors have an informal union they developed to avoid being exploited.

It compensates for them maybe charging ten bucks for something that earns the owner ten million dollars.

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