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AI for the Technical Professionals


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1 hour ago, Kesha said:

For example, tools like Midjourney can generate room layouts and mood boards in a matter of minutes, saving you time and creative energy.

If someone used Midjourney or similar to create images for their delivery, how is that affected by the community standards page:

https://www.fiverr.com/community/standards/ai-generated-content

where it says:

Quote

Sellers must:

  • Ensure they have all necessary rights to the content they create, including copyrights

According to perplexity.ai:

Quote

Midjourney subscribers own the images they create, but the images themselves are not eligible for copyright protection since they are not the product of human authorship.

The US Copyright Office has explicitly stated that Midjourney-generated images cannot be copyrighted, as the AI system, not a human, is the true "author" of the images.

Copyright law requires a work to be the product of human creativity and expression. Since Midjourney's AI system generates the images based on the prompts, without any substantial human editing or modification, the images are not considered copyrightable.

So based on that, the seller wouldn't have the copyrights to what they create from creating prompts in MidJourney (though the AI generated content section of the community standards says sellers must have those rights (all rights to what they create, including copyrights). Though they would probably have copyright of the other parts (but not the AI generated parts as far as I know), at least if there wasn't enough of human authorship after creating the images.

Also is the risk of legal problems from using image generators like MidJourney (given that they, like Stability AI were sued for copyright infringement) negligible so is it not a risk really for any Fiverr seller from that?

Edited by uk1000
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  • milos_siena changed the title to AI for the Technical Professionals

The prevailing legal opinion around AI and copyright is that it cannot be copyrighted, since copyright laws focus on human made work. Fiverr's "complex AI services" could be seen as a way of working around this by specifically requiring that humans "improve" the end result of whatever the AI produces, but I don't believe this argument has been tested in court yet. On the whole though, judges and legal professionals tend to view AI negatively (please don't write about how AI can help lawyers without Googling - there are some particularly famous examples of AI flubs in that world).

Indeed, if you look at OpenAI, they have several legal actions against them (the NYT is probably the most notable one). One of the reasons Google paid Reddit was so it could (among other things) use Reddits mountain of "high quality" content to train Gemini, and presumably help flesh out SGE. Google has also been fined by French authorities for violating IP rules. 

Considering AI's ability to hallucinate, should we really be pushing for AI use in domains where small errors can have disastrous outcomes? Medical AI, which Fiverr slipped into its webinar, is one area that I would consider risky, and architecture is another. There are plenty of other verticals where a small mistake has more serious consequences than embarrassment.

Since Fiverr, the platform, would be the facilitator of these services, it's not that hard to see how the company may be walking into a future scandal, especially with the high level of sellers who are selling AI services under deception of "human work".

 

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Also, just to bring up another point, here's something from an AI newsletter I'm subscribed to. Remember, Reddit has sold out its entire UGC website to Google for use in their own AI. The problem, which has been detailed in blog posts I've shared elsewhere, is this:

image.png.956ef31158347da97d99c742f5f54226.png

I'm sure the people who badword this forum have noticed this issue as well. It is telling that even pro-AI newsletters are concerned about the impact of undisclosed AI on forums (no matter who it comes from). They don't quite touch on the wider issue - that this will probably have some impact on Google's already horrific search results.

The point being that for people who are writing "technical documents" and who are using AI to assist with this, we are not that far away from a world in which the way  that AI is being trained and abused will render it not only more expensive to use (for OpenAI, for example), but also less useful. There is research out there that shows that after a certain point, a lot of AI models degrade. By degrade, I mean what we call hallucinations turn into something worse. I haven't seen anyone else refer to it as "dementia", but it almost looks like an AI version of dementia.

How does Fiverr plan to combat this eventuality in its marketplace? I know that the Motley Fool thinks Fiverr is a "great AI pick" but to be fair, the stock market and corporate AI washing is the source of the current AI bubble. What happens when that pops? It's a good question to start thinking about now, because if Fiverr is relying on a bubble to get it out of current issues, where does that leave Fiverr?

 

 

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35 minutes ago, emmaki said:

There is research out there that shows that after a certain point, a lot of AI models degrade. By degrade, I mean what we call hallucinations turn into something worse. I haven't seen anyone else refer to it as "dementia", but it almost looks like an AI version of dementia.

If it's trained on lots of AI generated content that might contain incorrect statements then it probably will get worse the more it gets trained on incorrect stuff.

I'm guessing normal hallucinations can be reduced by changing things like "temperature, top_p, and top_k," (though I haven't used chatGPT - and they might be only in the API - according to perplexity.ai) where temperature controls how random it is. So reducing the random part of it might make it less creative but might also reduce incorrect statements/hallucinations

Quote

What happens when that pops?

They could be doing more to validate it to make sure it's trained with accurate info and especially not AI generated misinformation, but also checking the content created after the prompt is entered against proper sources.

Edited by uk1000
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Temperature should reduce wrong information, but there's also the memory issue (ChatGPT will apparently soon be gifted with user-unique memory and an ability to remember the conversation - we'll see how that goes).

The problem I am speaking of is more the copyright issue. It's one thing if you have a small-scale AI that knows everything about you and your business, quite another if you're a "repository" of billions/trillions of words which can't really be sourced from "proper sources" if those sources are copyrighted. Then you're left with stuff like whatever u/callofdoody says on Reddit or some other forum. You don't really want "creativity" for professional answers, you want accuracy. But when the answers are coming from anonymous people who may be using Reddit's own algorithms to game authority rather than share it, stuff becomes a bit trickier.

20 minutes ago, uk1000 said:

They could be doing more to validate it to make sure it's trained with accurate info and especially not AI generated misinformation, but also checking the content created after the prompt is entered against proper sources.

Exhibit A: Fiverr Neo's ongoing inability to produce sellers that match my very clear search parameters.

I imagine all this checking would be very costly - perhaps too costly. One of the reasons AI is so beloved is due to its ability to increase "efficiency" and cut costs, with the result often being mediocre output. That's not necessarily bad: there is always room for mediocre output so long as it achieves whatever goals it has to, but the problem with AI in its current state is that it's a case of the emperor's new clothes. Nobody's getting excited about the mediocre content, yet due to the efficiency and time-savings (and duplicity), it is everywhere. This benefits nobody in the end.

The reality is - and yeah, Fiverr's identified this - is that humans need to make AI content better. But then we run into the thorns of the whole non-disclosure issue. 

 

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