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New Buyers should buy from Established Sellers


gina_riley2

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As an experienced buyer, I still find it daunting to filter thru thousands of gigs to find the right sellers. After hundreds of gig purchases, sometimes, I still get swindled by a newbie seller. Although, it's 2nd nature to me now, my 1st purchase was confusing and an overall bad experience.

A newbie buyer ordering from a newbie seller is basically, blind leading the blind. Neither one of you are sure how things work. One of you should have the experience to guide the other one on how to order, accept, and other questions.

Tips for new buyers:

1. Don't worry about levels, that's useless.

2. Look for sellers with at least 200 reviews. This will ensure the reviews are legit. Unfortunately, there are still scammers who buy or trade reviews.

3. Look at gig picture. Does it look nice or sloppy? Is it stolen off the internet (right click & reverse search) or original?

4. Actually read the sellers description on that gig. It doesn't matter what kind of gig you are buying, there is a universal sign for troublesome sellers:

* Bad grammar, misuse of punctuation, incoherent sentences, etc.

* Short description is a bad sign. The seller should write out what they will deliver and what they expect from you (the buyer).

* Sloppy description means sloppy delivery. If you see things like: Sir, Dear, etc. Not a good sign.

5. Do not message them via inbox, unless it's necessary.  As a buyer, once you contact a seller that way, they have unlimited access to contact you. It's a headache.

* Most established sellers should know better but not all of them follow the rules. You can get spammed with buy one get one free offer that you don't need or want.

* If you find a great seller that you are confident about then by all means have a convo with them about the order.

* If you have to message them, don't do a, "Hello, are you there." They may think you are a spammer. Add your question that wasn't answered in the gig description.

6. I know that there are different customs around the world where price negotiations are an every day thing. This platform is not one of them. Don't ask for a discount or offer them future work. There is no way to guarantee that. Established sellers will politely tell you to go away and then block you.

7. Regardless of who you hire, order a sample gig first. If they don't have a sample gig, it's okay to ask them, "Can I ask for a $10 or $20 sample?"

* They can send you a custom offer where they can do a small portion of your project. Afterwards, either you fit or not. Don't ask for modifications on a sample order.

* Don't ask for free samples. Time is money. You're not sampling wedding cakes for free, this is a freelance platform, pay for it!

* If sample is good or fits your need, discuss the project and place order.

* If sample isn't what you wanted, say thank you and go elsewhere. Just chaulk up your $20 as cost of doing business.

Note: In order for me to have found some really amazing sellers, I had to spend money on not so good and/or nightmare sellers. Don't let your first experience be a bad one. Buy from an established, well rounded seller.

After you've gained experience in buying, then you can trek into the pool of newbies to get yourself that diamond in a haystack. Many great and true professional sellers have to start here as a newbie and they need a chance.

Happy holidays everyone. 💙💛🤎

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What a nice post, Gina. The thread I would say doesn't only advise buyers but sellers as well. 

I understand how hard it is for buyers to filter or go through dozens, or even hundreds of sellers to select who fits the bill. I also understand and agree that buyers, mostly new buyers, must do their business with established sellers; however, don't you think '200' number is just too much? I mean a seller with 15-20 reviews may also be on their way of becoming an established seller. 

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8 minutes ago, rabihumakhan said:

don't you think '200' number is just too much?

I see your point. I was going with the thought of someone who is established for at least a year. I forget, there are high value, complex gigs that only sell few a month.

Dang it, I can't update/edit my OP. 😩

Edited by gina_riley2
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I just spent a little above over three months on here and have completed 25 orders. (2 are delivered and 2 are in the queue);  but I believe this doesn't make me a newbie or you can say an inexperienced seller. I'm a top-rated seller on another platform. 

Also, have worked here on with some V.I.Ds and didn't get a review less than 5*. 

I know some sellers may ravage your project or would seem dubious from their accounts and gigs, I still believe we can't find who's good and who's not without working with them. 

On 11/22/2021 at 2:43 PM, gina_riley2 said:

Dang it, I can't update/edit my OP. 😩

Haha. I know how it feels lol. 

BTW, just outta curiosity lemme ask, are you a seller or a buyer only? And what kind of services do you mostly purchase? 

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Good points here! This can be a very confusing platform to navigate if you're not used to its quirks. So if you're new, teaming up with a seasoned pro who can walk you through the steps is extremely helpful. 

Then, as you get familiar with the platform, you'll naturally feel comfortable rummaging around a bit further for promising newcomers, and you can in turn help THEM.  

I liked these points in particular, in no particular order: 

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

* If you have to message them, don't do a, "Hello, are you there." They may think you are a spammer. Add your question that wasn't answered in the gig description.

YES. Please don't just say Hi. 1. If the person you're trying to contact doesn't automatically assume you're just a spammer/scammer and flag you as spam, the system very well may automatically move your message to the spam folder anyway. 2. It will save you some time trading messages back and forth, because the person you're trying to contact won't have to ask you what you want. 😂 And 3 as an afterthought - I'm not sure at what point the system will automatically flag you as spam if you're sending the same message to a bunch of people while you're shopping around. Just be mindful that spamming several people at once to see who's available may be flagged as just that - spam - even if you're legitimately searching for an available seller. 

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

I know that there are different customs around the world where price negotiations are an every day thing. This platform is not one of them. Don't ask for a discount or offer them future work. There is no way to guarantee that. Established sellers will politely tell you to go away and then block you.

I would definitely agree, with very few exceptions. I may work with most reasonable budgets, if someone's in a pinch, it's a reasonable offer, I have the time and availability to accommodate, and if you're willing to work with ME in return. Example: Your budget is CLOSE, but you can give me an extra day or two to fit your project into my recording schedule.

My primary rule for working with reasonable budgets is: be reasonable, perhaps also be flexible in another area to allow the seller to accommodate your budget, and DEFINITELY don't be rude about it. If I provide a quote, and someone comes back with, "That's way too much," I will politely block you and encourage others to do the same. 

One thing I would definitely agree with 100% is not to promise future work for a discount today. In the immortal words of Professor Snape, "Don't. Lie. To me." Loyalty discounts don't kick in on the first order. 😉

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

Don't ask for free samples. Time is money. You're not sampling wedding cakes for free, this is a freelance platform, pay for it!

Also agree, depending on your field. In some areas, like mine (voiceover), it can be expected to have to provide BRIEF samples, like an audition. However, it can be subject to availability, and please do not expect to receive a full project (a read of your full script, or a complete mock-up of whatever) as a "sample". We spend a lot of time and money putting together demos and samples that showcase our range and skills. I'm not gonna lie, it gets tedious when every single message that comes in is a request for a custom sample - we may receive several of these kinds of messages on any given day. Especially when those requests say things like, "we really like this one particular spot in your demo, can we get a sample like that?" Be mindful of this, reference specific portfolio samples, and be prepared to pay a minimum session fee, or a sample fee, if required. 

This is why this is a great set of suggestions, and it's a great idea to pair up with a very seasoned seller if you're a newcomer. Ask, and we'll be more than happy to guide you through your first steps until you're rummaging like a pro, yourself. 😄 

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On 12/4/2021 at 1:03 PM, nasir_hojja said:

But who will give the job to the new seller?

Hopefully, established buyers who sees something unique about you and your gig.

Since, you're competing with thousands of sellers and hundreds of newbie, ask yourself a question: "What makes my profile/gig better than the guy/gal next to me?"

I saw your gigs. It's nicely done but it looks similar to the seller next to you. 

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well, very informative material you have there, thank you
I think was just a bit lucky then, to get orders from some happy buyers knowing my gigs have sloppy description and bad grammar.
makes me wonder will I get more customers by simply fixing the grammar and improving the sloppy descriptions.

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On 11/29/2021 at 3:21 PM, greystorm2 said:

Then, as you get familiar with the platform, you'll naturally feel comfortable rummaging around a bit further for promising newcomers, and you can in turn help THEM.  

Hey Storm,  Nice to see you on the forum.  Seems we often wander back to the "how can I use/help/encourage new sellers, and I love the fact that there are those that have the patience of a saint in this area, but that little cynical voice in my head always kicks in, and I find myself asking if it is wise.  My thought process.  Whenever I need my engine tuned, I go right back to the same certified, master shop, with techs trained by German techs in fine tuning these particular engines.  Perfect, out the door every time.  It never, ever occurs to me to look around for some new mechanic, just starting out, who has the best of intentions to take a wrench to my engine. 

Why do we do this with freelancers? When we would never do it with our doctor, dentist, accountant, and hopefully never with a pilot. 😱

I suppose if one is doing so out of a sense of charity, or a lack of budget, I completely understand, however, if I need something done, I want a seasoned seller who won't waste my time, eat my money while learning their craft, or make my blood pressure rise. 

Edited by newsmike
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#7 is really, really important to consider. It's also usable when budget-limited and sticking to newer/cheaper sellers. Consider what is the smallest possible deliverable within the project, and pay sellers one by one to do it until finding someone good enough. It can take a long time to find good people, but that time is potentially regained by having a few good candidates running concurrently.

I want to expand on #2 though. The high rating count could also mean the seller has done enough projects that they know common miscommunications, and may ask accurate clarifications which you didn't know to consider. A new buyer who doesn't know how to communicate what they want will get a failed delivery no matter what kind of seller they give the details to. Garbage in, garbage out. A buyer can figure it out the hard way by grinding through cheap sellers and learning from mistakes, or they can potentially get some bonus free guidance from a responsive seller who sees the revision traps before they fall into them. The former method is cheaper, but shouldn't be tried on a timeline/schedule. You can have things three ways; good, fast, and cheap. Pick two.

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On 12/6/2021 at 12:01 PM, newsmike said:

Why do we do this with freelancers? When we would never do it with our doctor, dentist, accountant, and hopefully never with a pilot. 😱

I suppose if one is doing so out of a sense of charity, or a lack of budget, I completely understand, however, if I need something done, I want a seasoned seller who won't waste my time, eat my money while learning their craft, or make my blood pressure rise. 

Well, several things. New businesses pop up every day, everywhere. Everyone, without exception, starts off somewhere, some how. That pilot flew professionally for the very first time once, after a whole lotta training, and you may or may not have been on that plane. 

The folks we always go to now didn't burst onto the scene with their current level of real-world experience. Presumably a lot of training, yes, but not actual real life hands on experience. HOWEVER... even that's changing, at least for freelance platforms.

We must also think that freelancers here on the platform are brand new to their field, just because they're new to Fiverr. As Fiverr has improved over time, that is NOT the case anymore. More experienced folks are starting to learn that the whole "gig economy" thing isn't going away, and they're starting to dip their toes in the gig/freelance waters. 

So you could very well be passing up freelancers who ARE experienced, just late to the platform party. 😄 

Edited by greystorm2
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54 minutes ago, greystorm2 said:

So you could very well be passing up freelancers who ARE experienced, just late to the platform party. 😄 

Great point.  I'll bet if you and I walked through the doors of the MGM Grand in Vegas, we might head in different directions based on odds.  But, I totally get your sentiment. 😀  

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On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

2. Look for sellers with at least 200 reviews. This will ensure the reviews are legit. Unfortunately, there are still scammers who buy or trade reviews.

They will have to pass on too many pros. We've had TRSs with less than 200 reviews. So...

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

3. Look at gig picture. Does it look nice or sloppy? Is it stolen off the internet (right click & reverse search) or original?

Not everyone is a graphic designer. Gig images mean nothing if what you're looking for has nothing to do with graphic. Remember, not every shiny object is gold. 

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

4. Actually read the sellers description on that gig. It doesn't matter what kind of gig you are buying, there is a universal sign for troublesome sellers:

* Bad grammar, misuse of punctuation, incoherent sentences, etc.

* Short description is a bad sign. The seller should write out what they will deliver and what they expect from you (the buyer).

* Sloppy description means sloppy delivery. If you see things like: Sir, Dear, etc. Not a good sign.

Just like the graphic, not everyone is a writer or native speaker. Many people use short description because most of their gig info is covered within their gig video. And addresses like sir, dear, etc are only a cultural trait. Nothing is going to change that! 

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

5. Do not message them via inbox, unless it's necessary.  As a buyer, once you contact a seller that way, they have unlimited access to contact you. It's a headache.

Not that big of a problem. You can always block them if they spam you.

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

6. I know that there are different customs around the world where price negotiations are an every day thing. This platform is not one of them. Don't ask for a discount or offer them future work. There is no way to guarantee that. Established sellers will politely tell you to go away and then block you.

Regardless of the popular opinion, I don't mind buyers trying to negotiate. But yeah, come up with something better than bulk order or a promise for future work. XD

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

7. Regardless of who you hire, order a sample gig first. If they don't have a sample gig, it's okay to ask them, "Can I ask for a $10 or $20 sample?"

It won't work all the time. Fiverr calculates average selling price. They may not want to ruin their stats for a test. Besides, test runs usually mean you do not trust them, which alone is enough of bad start for them to skip you. It's better to order only if and when you're 100% sure they can do the job. Otherwise, look for someone better.

Also, at last, don't hire based on experience alone. Most of the established sellers aren't even aware of current trends. Many haven't updated their gigs since eons (including me). So do your due diligence. And order from someone who can offer what you need. 

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On 11/23/2021 at 12:41 AM, gina_riley2 said:

2. Look for sellers with at least 200 reviews. This will ensure the reviews are legit. Unfortunately, there are still scammers who buy or trade reviews.

Isn't this a bit harsh to say? Sellers among whom have really good experience in the real world rather than the online marketplace. And having a new account is a burden because many people don't even want to buy anything seeing a new seller account. so what will we do if we have new accounts? We can't bring 200 reviews magically right?

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2 hours ago, rayhan_designs said:

Isn't this a bit harsh to say?

No she's right.  Unfortunately there has been a literal flood of scammers and spammers from a very specific geographic location who steal from other sellers gigs, lie about their qualifications and then steal from buyers. Until a pay wall for sellers, or some other form of verification and vetting is put in place, we must assume that most new sellers are too risky, and should be avoided.

Your disapproval should not be aimed a buyer who has been burned, and is now, therefore very cautious. You should be disappointed in the scammers from that certain location who are ruining it for all new sellers. I have not seen you take any of them to task here in the forums.  

Our advice remains, filter and purchase only from TRS/PRO or Level 2 sellers with over 200 5 star reviews. 

Edited by newsmike
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3 hours ago, newsmike said:

No she's right.  Unfortunately there has been a literal flood of scammers and spammers from a very specific geographic location who steal from other sellers gigs, lie about their qualifications and then steal from buyers. Until a pay wall for sellers, or some other form of verification and vetting is put in place, we must assume that most new sellers are too risky, and should be avoided.

Your disapproval should not be aimed a buyer who has been burned, and is now, therefore very cautious. You should be disappointed in the scammers from that certain location who are ruining it for all new sellers. I have not seen you take any of them to task here in the forums.  

Our advice remains, filter and purchase only from TRS/PRO or Level 2 sellers with over 200 5 star reviews. 

OK. I respect your opinion. But tell me one thing. What about the rising talents, who have potentials. You're saying about level two? why ? are level 1 seller not qualified didn't they make out through the hardship? you're being quite a selfish type who is giving others wrong advice in my opinion. and you have plenty of options to deal with with the seller. You can buy a cheap-Price demo. Then you can decide whether or not. Don't spread toxicity, please

May you have a good day. Arigato(Thanks)

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58 minutes ago, rayhan_designs said:

What about the rising talents, who have potentials.

What about them?  We all started as a new seller with no sales, at zero.  We all had to slug it out taking slimy "buyer requests", and selling at prices that it is illegal to pay someone in any civilized country. The difference is that, unlike you, I did all that and did not complain, or expect others to prop me up. How about the rising talents work hard to propel themselves as we all did, instead of expecting others to do it for them?  Again, I'll ask, why do you take others to task for not helping you, instead of taking scammers and spammers to task for making new sellers a bet not worth taking? 

As to whether I am selfish, please don't judge me. At least I did my own work, my own promotion and my own path.  I did not whine for someone to make it easy for me. If you have no sales, look in the mirror.  

Edited by newsmike
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On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

2. Look for sellers with at least 200 reviews. This will ensure the reviews are legit. Unfortunately, there are still scammers who buy or trade reviews.

I agree with everything you've said (especially about the red flags) except for this.

How would one build themselves up to a 200 reviews mark if every buyer in here would order from a seller with over 200 reviews? 😕

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On 12/18/2021 at 9:24 PM, creative_howl said:

How would one build themselves up to a 200 reviews mark if every buyer in here would order from a seller with over 200 reviews? 😕 

These are advices for a brand new, never ordered before buyers. Experienced and business buyers will do whatever they also do. 

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On 12/18/2021 at 9:56 PM, gina_riley2 said:

These are advices for a brand new, never ordered before buyers. 

Experienced and business buyers will do whatever they also do.

You know what, I just went through some horrifying threads about buyers being mistreated by new sellers. Now I understand where you're coming from. I myself would stay away from NS after seeing that. 

However, I'm proud to say that many of the clients I've served so far is brand new to the platform, And I have completed their projects in a way that is satisfactory for both of us. Which resulted in me getting repeat business from at least 90% of the clients I've served so far ❤️

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On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

2. Look for sellers with at least 200 reviews. This will ensure the reviews are legit. Unfortunately, there are still scammers who buy or trade reviews.

Whew. 😅 I'm just a smidgen over 200 total total reviews, so I guess I barely qualify! Account and review traders should be hung upside down by their toenails... 🦶🦶

On 11/22/2021 at 1:41 PM, gina_riley2 said:

5. Do not message them via inbox, unless it's necessary.  As a buyer, once you contact a seller that way, they have unlimited access to contact you. It's a headache.

It's so sad and infuriating that there are unscrupulous sellers who would twist something so foundational like messaging into a means of uninvited communication and harassment.

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4 minutes ago, enunciator said:

It's so sad and infuriating that there are unscrupulous sellers who would twist something so foundational like messaging into a means of uninvited communication and harassment.

I personally can't wait for the communication to end. It means a job well done. Or done at least 🙂 

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