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New Buyers should buy from Established Sellers


gina_riley2
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40 minutes ago, nasir_hojja said:

But who will give the job to the new seller?

Hopefully, established buyers who sees something unique about you and your gig.

Since, you're competing with thousands of sellers and hundreds of newbie, ask yourself a question: "What makes my profile/gig better than the guy/gal next to me?"

I saw your gigs. It's nicely done but it looks similar to the seller next to you. 

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well, very informative material you have there, thank you
I think was just a bit lucky then, to get orders from some happy buyers knowing my gigs have sloppy description and bad grammar.
makes me wonder will I get more customers by simply fixing the grammar and improving the sloppy descriptions.

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On 11/29/2021 at 2:21 PM, greystorm2 said:

Then, as you get familiar with the platform, you'll naturally feel comfortable rummaging around a bit further for promising newcomers, and you can in turn help THEM.  

Hey Storm,  Nice to see you on the forum.  Seems we often wander back to the "how can I use/help/encourage new sellers, and I love the fact that there are those that have the patience of a saint in this area, but that little cynical voice in my head always kicks in, and I find myself asking if it is wise.  My thought process.  Whenever I need my engine tuned, I go right back to the same certified, master shop, with techs trained by German techs in fine tuning these particular engines.  Perfect, out the door every time.  It never, ever occurs to me to look around for some new mechanic, just starting out, who has the best of intentions to take a wrench to my engine. 

Why do we do this with freelancers? When we would never do it with our doctor, dentist, accountant, and hopefully never with a pilot. 😱

I suppose if one is doing so out of a sense of charity, or a lack of budget, I completely understand, however, if I need something done, I want a seasoned seller who won't waste my time, eat my money while learning their craft, or make my blood pressure rise. 

 

Edited by newsmike
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#7 is really, really important to consider. It's also usable when budget-limited and sticking to newer/cheaper sellers. Consider what is the smallest possible deliverable within the project, and pay sellers one by one to do it until finding someone good enough. It can take a long time to find good people, but that time is potentially regained by having a few good candidates running concurrently.

I want to expand on #2 though. The high rating count could also mean the seller has done enough projects that they know common miscommunications, and may ask accurate clarifications which you didn't know to consider. A new buyer who doesn't know how to communicate what they want will get a failed delivery no matter what kind of seller they give the details to. Garbage in, garbage out. A buyer can figure it out the hard way by grinding through cheap sellers and learning from mistakes, or they can potentially get some bonus free guidance from a responsive seller who sees the revision traps before they fall into them. The former method is cheaper, but shouldn't be tried on a timeline/schedule. You can have things three ways; good, fast, and cheap. Pick two.

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On 12/6/2021 at 9:01 AM, newsmike said:

Why do we do this with freelancers? When we would never do it with our doctor, dentist, accountant, and hopefully never with a pilot. 😱

I suppose if one is doing so out of a sense of charity, or a lack of budget, I completely understand, however, if I need something done, I want a seasoned seller who won't waste my time, eat my money while learning their craft, or make my blood pressure rise. 

 

Well, several things. New businesses pop up every day, everywhere. Everyone, without exception, starts off somewhere, some how. That pilot flew professionally for the very first time once, after a whole lotta training, and you may or may not have been on that plane. 

The folks we always go to now didn't burst onto the scene with their current level of real-world experience. Presumably a lot of training, yes, but not actual real life hands on experience. HOWEVER... even that's changing, at least for freelance platforms.

We must also think that freelancers here on the platform are brand new to their field, just because they're new to Fiverr. As Fiverr has improved over time, that is NOT the case anymore. More experienced folks are starting to learn that the whole "gig economy" thing isn't going away, and they're starting to dip their toes in the gig/freelance waters. 

So you could very well be passing up freelancers who ARE experienced, just late to the platform party. 😄 

 

Edit: Also, hi, by the way! 🙂

 

Edited by greystorm2
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54 minutes ago, greystorm2 said:

So you could very well be passing up freelancers who ARE experienced, just late to the platform party. 😄 

Great point.  I'll bet if you and I walked through the doors of the MGM Grand in Vegas, we might head in different directions based on odds.  But, I totally get your sentiment. 😀  

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On 11/22/2021 at 10:41 AM, gina_riley2 said:

2. Look for sellers with at least 200 reviews. This will ensure the reviews are legit. Unfortunately, there are still scammers who buy or trade reviews.

They will have to pass on too many pros. We've had TRSs with less than 200 reviews. So...

 

On 11/22/2021 at 10:41 AM, gina_riley2 said:

3. Look at gig picture. Does it look nice or sloppy? Is it stolen off the internet (right click & reverse search) or original?

Not everyone is a graphic designer. Gig images mean nothing if what you're looking for has nothing to do with graphic. Remember, not every shiny object is gold. 

 

On 11/22/2021 at 10:41 AM, gina_riley2 said:

4. Actually read the sellers description on that gig. It doesn't matter what kind of gig you are buying, there is a universal sign for troublesome sellers:

* Bad grammar, misuse of punctuation, incoherent sentences, etc.

* Short description is a bad sign. The seller should write out what they will deliver and what they expect from you (the buyer).

* Sloppy description means sloppy delivery. If you see things like: Sir, Dear, etc. Not a good sign.

Just like the graphic, not everyone is a writer or native speaker. Many people use short description because most of their gig info is covered within their gig video. And addresses like sir, dear, etc are only a cultural trait. Nothing is going to change that! 

 

On 11/22/2021 at 10:41 AM, gina_riley2 said:

5. Do not message them via inbox, unless it's necessary.  As a buyer, once you contact a seller that way, they have unlimited access to contact you. It's a headache.

Not that big of a problem. You can always block them if they spam you.

 

On 11/22/2021 at 10:41 AM, gina_riley2 said:

6. I know that there are different customs around the world where price negotiations are an every day thing. This platform is not one of them. Don't ask for a discount or offer them future work. There is no way to guarantee that. Established sellers will politely tell you to go away and then block you.

Regardless of the popular opinion, I don't mind buyers trying to negotiate. But yeah, come up with something better than bulk order or a promise for future work. XD

 

On 11/22/2021 at 10:41 AM, gina_riley2 said:

7. Regardless of who you hire, order a sample gig first. If they don't have a sample gig, it's okay to ask them, "Can I ask for a $10 or $20 sample?"

It won't work all the time. Fiverr calculates average selling price. They may not want to ruin their stats for a test. Besides, test runs usually mean you do not trust them, which alone is enough of bad start for them to skip you. It's better to order only if and when you're 100% sure they can do the job. Otherwise, look for someone better.

 

Also, at last, don't hire based on experience alone. Most of the established sellers aren't even aware of current trends. Many haven't updated their gigs since eons (including me). So do your due diligence. And order from someone who can offer what you need. 

 

Xx

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On 12/10/2021 at 10:29 AM, md_yousuf_islam said:

A new seller but he is might be better service provide his buyers.  but he new Fiverr market. his not any reviews. What can be done in this case.

I strongly suggest Grammarly to help you communicate more effectively in English.  

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On 12/13/2021 at 8:39 AM, gina_riley2 said:

1. Gig pic

2. Your pic

3. Gig description- writing skills

 

What do you notice the most?

Noted! I will try to update my Gig Description writing skills a bit better then haha.

Well I am not a Buyer, I am still fairly new in Fiverr so just focusing on selling for now. If I become a Buyer, I would probably notice if they have clear description about their services & portfolio.

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On 11/23/2021 at 12:41 AM, gina_riley2 said:

2. Look for sellers with at least 200 reviews. This will ensure the reviews are legit. Unfortunately, there are still scammers who buy or trade reviews.

Isn't this a bit harsh to say? Sellers among whom have really good experience in the real world rather than the online marketplace. And having a new account is a burden because many people don't even want to buy anything seeing a new seller account. so what will we do if we have new accounts? We can't bring 200 reviews magically right?

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2 hours ago, rayhan_designs said:

Isn't this a bit harsh to say?

No she's right.  Unfortunately there has been a literal flood of scammers and spammers from a very specific geographic location who steal from other sellers gigs, lie about their qualifications and then steal from buyers. Until a pay wall for sellers, or some other form of verification and vetting is put in place, we must assume that most new sellers are too risky, and should be avoided.

Your disapproval should not be aimed a buyer who has been burned, and is now, therefore very cautious. You should be disappointed in the scammers from that certain location who are ruining it for all new sellers. I have not seen you take any of them to task here in the forums.  

Our advice remains, filter and purchase only from TRS/PRO or Level 2 sellers with over 200 5 star reviews. 

Edited by newsmike
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