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How do we stop the soul sucking


ikaluara

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Be expensive:

Stop selling yourself short and charge more per gig. Meaning, instead of writing an entire article for 500 words, charge $5 for every 100 words or even 50 words. Guarantee your buyers that the’re going to get quality work and the reason they’re paying more is because it will encourage more quality out of you by giving their gig the amount of time and attention it deserves. The competition doesn’t care how much you charge and there will always be someone who will be able to do it cheaper than you. That’s just how business is. Position yourself as the quality/premium seller. You will still get sales and you’ll actually be doing work worthwhile. You will increase your hourly rate like this.

Be selective:

Don’t take on every order you get. It’s okay to cancel. If you do video testimonials, list the kinds of work/businesses you will not make videos for and be firm. Sure you will lose a few orders here and there but if you think you’re selling your soul, it’ll keep you on Fiverr longer.

Don’t do the soul sucking gigs:

They’re not for everyone. If you’re doing a gig that requires too much work for $4 or a gig that you feel uncomfortable doing, stop doing it. You need to enjoy what you sell on Fiverr on some level. You won’t last long and you will lose motivation if it’s purely about making those $4.

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Agree, but don’t you think we have to start out cheap to get customers? I am slowly driving my prices up so that I don’t scare away regulars. Although, it’s funny-- the more expensive I get, the more orders I get! I think people often look to prices to show quality.

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I don’t look at my rank in the search results. I don’t care. Buyers find me anyway. I also don’t look at prices of the competition. If they want to flip burgers and do the gigs in their lunch break so be it.
If you don’t want to be treated like a cheapo and attract cheapo buyers (who will suck you dry for nothing in return) then don’t act like cheapo.

Also, listen to your guts. I send 80% of potential buyers away to cheaper buyers. I even send somebody away who wanted me to do a $700,- gig for the mere fact that I felt we weren’t a good match.

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If you’re too expensive and don’t have enough reviews, you’re not going to get any orders.

Nobody’s going to pay you $5 for 50 words unless you’re a Top Rated Seller with 50 people in his queue and maybe 1,000 positive reviews.

If you don’t have the time to write 500-word articles for $5, maybe you should do something else. Not everyone is meant to be an article writer.

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There’s some truth in all of the comments here. The main problem, if you want to call it that, is that before being able to set your own price you need to show the Fiverr community that you are actually the right person for the job.

If you were starting out in the real world, you would have to do the same. An unrated seller with extremely high prices simply won’t receive any orders. Why would anyone risk investing large sums on a project that is not guaranteed to be handled, completed and delivered properly?

Competition also plays a huge role in keeping the fees a lot lower than they should be. Someone here mentioned charging up to 50 USD for a 200 words article. While your products might just be the most amazing out there, potential customers might choose someone else unless you show them that you are exactly what they’re looking for.

Starting low and slowly driving your prices up as your reputation solidifies might just be the best course of action. As @misscrystal said, consider this the price of doing business. Keep delivering good quality products and being nice to your buyers and they will gladly pay you a bit more next time.

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I’d like to mention what @mariokluser said. Target your buyer audience and know your skills and value. If you’re a professional (and I’m not talking about education, I’m talking about experience and skill), you can charge way more than someone who just starts doing it. That doesn’t mean you should sell your soul by (sticking to the example above) writing a 500-words text for $5.

I’m a seller for less than half a year now and have already made lots of money through Fiverr. In my first days as seller, I decided to target my clients and did raise my prices. I don’t get that many requests or sells, but the ones I get are worth more than dozens of small ones. It’s the quality that sells. And I’m neither a good sales person nor a good copy writer – especially in a foreign language – but I’m learning and increasing everyday.
Speaking of, it’s time to change my gig descriptions, I’ve noticed that they’re badly written and don’t target my preferred target audience as well as they could…

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I did exactly this and I think that it works. I started pout cheap to attract buyers and build both my profile and my portfolio. After that I slowly raised my prices (and I still am) to get to the level I want to be. Once people can see that you produce quality then you will attract the type of buyers you want to deal with.

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