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Some One Message me and says its my work


n_shah

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Hi to everyone…
Today,I received a message from someone i can say a Fiverr member.I have recently added a new Intro,which i have downloaded from a free source.What should i do with it.He said that remove the gig in 24 hours or your account will be disabled.Every answer is important.Thanks

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He is selling nothing at all? He only has a new account?

Where did you get the video from? Did it say it was free and could be used to re sell to your buyers?

Ask him for some kind of proof he owns the video rights.

Anyone can say anything. But if you did copy it from a place that did not say you could use it and sell it, then take it down anyway.

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He is selling nothing at all and he has new account in this month.I have downloaded it from a free source.I dont even know he is the true owner of the thing and everyone is using and downloading it from there.

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Guest buddyzapp

I went through your profile, some of your intro videos are from Envato marketplace and are licensed under Envato’s license. They should not be used on fiverr but are being used here by many sellers. Some of the other day they will automatically be removed from your account with a warning to not to use copyright material.
As soon as somebody files dmca notice, you’ll gig would be immediately removed.

I would suggest you to refrain from using such material.

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Yes, you are using some Envato studio content which although it is sometimes free to download, is not free to use commercially without paying for the necessary commercial privileges (often per use). This being the case, I would strongly recommend that you remove this material and immediately cease from selling any work which you do not hold the necessary rights to.

If you haven’t paid for these rights, you are not just stealing, but selling on work which your customers could get in serious trouble for using.

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Yeah, this is why I pay other people to make my videos. Whether it’s a whiteboard, blackboard, trailer, anything is better than those “free” options that turned out to be not so free after all.

I did do one video with iMovie, just music and a combination of supers that dissolve. It came out well, but took me so long I haven’t done it again. The iMovie of my youth was a lot easier to use than the iMovie of today.

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In this case, it was easy. He is/was using a Fiverr demo video (the kind you use to explain your gig) which still featured the Envato studio logo but which he has added a few overlays to in order to say ‘your logo here’ etc. In this case, and looking at a few other videos, I’m guessing that most if not all his video offerings are actually Envato videos which he is simply cutting and pasting new objects into.

As for how to tell if a video is the real deal, I have an agency subscription to a web based video platform and can easily show buyers the receipt for that or forward them that platforms contact details to check that I have full sales rights.

Of course, real, starting from scratch video animation done using desktop software is a bit trickier to verify the rights of. If it was me ordering, though, I’d simply ask a seller what software they were using, research it a bit and try and satisfy myself that as long as a seller isn’t using a pirated copy, any video they create would be free for me to use.

The key, in this case, is simply to ask a seller how they make their videos and how they can assure you that they have BOTH commercialization and monetization rights. No legitimate seller would ever have a problem with answering these questions.

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First off: the mere reason that everybody is doing it doesn’t make it legal. On Fiverr are tons of copyright infringements in nearly 90% of all gigs I come across. This doesn’t makes it right.

If you download something from a free source, you always need to check the license agreement. It’s very rare that you get the rights for commercial use for free. Commercial use isn’t only reselling or using third party content in a new product, but also the use for endorsement of a gig. There are e.g. a lot of gigs that offer Photoshop work and they use images of celebrities in their galleries. All of these sellers infringing copyrights, as they are using imagery of e.g. Angelina Jolie to endorse their gigs. Believe me, if this girl endorses something it will cost a !@#$-load of money.

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