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A good video for your gig is imperative


derek53
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Not every gig needs a video. Videos are great for some gigs, but for others, static photos are ideal. If you’re selling voice-over services, then yes, a video will help your clients learn more about you and hear how your voice sounds. But if you’re selling logo design services, static images of some of the logos you’ve created would be sufficient.

Then again, though, it would appear that your original comment was only shared in order to encourage people to purchase YOUR video editing services. In which case, you’re advertising your services in the wrong forum.

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Lol, nice way to try to get sales, kiddo. But no, many TRS just have one or two images on their best selling gigs. Videos are a nice touch and they increase conversion, that’s true but that not’s the case for all gigs. For some gigs, all you need is a good description and a great starting offer.

Videos are imperative for gigs where your voice, performance or appearance is the key of the service you’re providing. For these gigs the buyer needs to be able to have a sample of your voice, your performance or see you physically to know if they want you to work for them.

The rest of the gigs on fiverr gain very little from videos except being able to summarize 1200+ words in a 50s video. However, most buyers will still read the description and inbox you before deciding to buy your gig so the video does very little for you. For these gigs, its better if the seller invests a day or two on figuring out how to do a decent video by themselves.

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Sometimes the seller have a video in process but didnt got it a prooved, like me waiting more than 24 hours for my gig videos and just on saturdays or sundays, it takes long time. I dont know why it have to be so for a 1 min video (50 mb).

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My thoughts about this video thing… It is true that video is more engaging and will probably land you more sales on your gig than if you don’t have a video. In the years that come probably 90% of the content online will be video and nobody will bother reading.

But you can’t just create video for every gig. As @solow13 said, depends from the nature of the gig. Further more, you don’t have to create video when gig was created… First create some gig, then wait to see if the gig has started to receive clicks. Not views, not impressions but clicks. This means that people are really interested in your gig and they click on it to find out more. Now once you see people being interested, you can give them video content instead of bothering them with reading.

If you have gig that has milions of views and impressions and only a few clicks, then why would you spend resources on making video for that gig that nobody is interested in?

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That’s not true, I have 3 gigs without videos and they get orders, I have one gig with a video that has gotten no orders. When I started on Fiverr, I had no money so I couldn’t afford to hire people to make me videos. Later on, I did add videos to most of my gigs, but not all.

Now I admit a video can be a powerful commercial for your gig, but that doesn’t mean everyone wants to watch your video. I certainly don’t watch every video when I’m searching for things to buy.

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Meh, I’m a writer. I don’t need a video. I’m not Billy Mays. Wouldn’t a video only really work if you worked in video? Sure, I get that video advertising and marketing is really taking off, but consider your clients… not everyone enjoys broadband, and if you’ve got a shitty internet connection, you’re not going to watch a video. Especially an advertising video, unless it was really really good–and let’s be honest, “buy my awesome gig on Fiverr plz” won’t be that video.

Focus on the blurb.

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Yeah, they say that. But I could tell you that if you don’t have a website you’re losing 67% of potential customers. It’s just marketing BS. I’m sure it works, but I’d love to see which stats they specifically chose out of ALL of them to arrive at 220%.

Or maybe it was just a number they pulled out of their ass, rounded up.

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