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Why am i not getting buyers


degenie

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Am sure many new sellers on Fiverr are asking the same question, but when i asked a friend who is a buyer on fiverr this same question, he said it because it because i have no review. Then i asked how am i going to have a review when buyers dont even order my gigs.



Am seeing values for impressions, clicks and view, yet no orders.



So if you are a new seller and you are getting orders coming in without getting friends to buy your gigs only to get a review, then please do share your secret. Because at this point, i don’t understand why i can’t just be new and be giving a benefit of a doubt (at least you can always get a refund if dissatisfied).



I hope someone tells me exactly what am doing wrong… i will really appreciate that…

[self-promotion removed]

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Hi @degenie! I took a look at your gigs and I’ll try to give you some personal advice. I haven’t looked up your profile photo on the web yet, but it sure has the look of a stock photo. If it isn’t, ignore that part. There are so many stock photos of attractive women on Fiverr those can actually work against you.

Your gigs are in areas that already have many, many sellers and you have two gigs that look extremely similar. I would consider trying to make your gigs more unique in some way and/or add some more gigs perhaps in categories that aren’t so overloaded. I say this again and again but I actually buy a lot of gigs in the “fun” category because there are many very unique gigs there that make for good gifts, pranks, funny YouTube videos, etc. That is one area of Fiverr that doesn’t show up in the TV ads and doesn’t get much attention in general, but has lots of room for new ideas.

Finally, it is possible to get your first couple of sales being just new and being given benefit of the doubt. It’s hard though, especially when even if someone decides to take a chance on a newbie, they have hundreds of brand new sellers to choose from in one category alone.

I don’t think it’s a bad thing at all to get a friend or family member to help you out, but utilize it to the fullest. Get them to really utilize your skill, not just buy your gig because they know you. Almost everyone can find some way to use a gig. Friends and family might want a cool Facebook banner, an ad for their church or club website, or something they can use for church or school. Don’t just have them buy, but give them a really good product and have them rate/review you honestly based on real work. 1 or 2 sales can indeed help you springboard into more Fiverr success.

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I think that you should maybe check the grammar in your profile. I know that is simple, but one word off from the grammar being right can hurt your whole profile. There are only two gigs on there. Maybe offer a variety to get more hits on there. Hang in there. I started off slow, but the more reviews and genuine reviews that you get can really help. Best wishes. (oh the the profile picture is too good, maybe take a real shot of you and load it up, people like to see who they are working with for real)

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Make some designs that show of your work and possibly add a process image to show that the designs are truly yours. Also go to the buyer requests and really low ball your services until someone bites and you get your first review, after that you can charge a more reasonable price for your work. You have 10 offers a day, Use them. All my sales have come from offers I have sent.

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This forum is SCATTERED and SPLATTERED with tips and well…this EXACT SAME POST!! So over it…

The moderators do everything they can to deter this type of nonsense, yet they just keep appearing. My advice…spend more than a day or week on Fiverr before posting this junk.

‘I just signed up for Fiverr an hour ago and haven’t gotten a billion buyers yet, what is wrong??’

Lol.

You also claim you are from the United States and speak English only but after reading your post, I’m thinking not… ‘giving a benefit of the doubt’ = ‘given the benefit’. You are also missing ‘I’ in a lot of your sentences and it’s ‘would really appreciate that’ not ‘will really appreciate that’… START THERE FIRST.

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@degenie @gailbunning @sparklingaurora - This discussion below I have used to Guide A LOT of new sellers to getting scores of orders in a short time.

http://forum.fiverr.com/discussion/73207/10-best-seller-tips-fiverrforums-beneficial-to-all-best-for-newbies-#Item_1

Please review and leave your feedback. All the Best!

Have A Great Weekend & Happy Selling!! Cheers!

Regards,
Speedy876


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I’m a buyer. I own a company looking for graphic designers who do mostly banner-type work. Let’s get past all the hocus-pocus superstition and get to business with your question.

When I look at graphics, I don’t give a hoot what the seller looks like or what their background might be. They may have worked for the Guggenheim or in some other design role but that doesn’t matter, because I’m looking for performance NOW, not then. I’ve seen work from design department managers that was hideous. My point: resume doesn’t matter if I’m a serious buyer.

I browse through the artwork paying attention to use of color, line, layout, font, etc. I’m a designer myself (among other things), so I know when someone is phoning it in (i.e. lazy work, plagiarized aesthetics) or simply needs more development. Some designers simply don’t have the kind of quality I look for. I don’t tell them, I just skip over their work looking for better.

Now, let’s say I come across an illustrator or designer who does good work. I then have to match that work with my product and decide whether it looks like it will enhance or will be ignored. I can’t survey every potential customer to see if the design works- I just have to go with what I like, and that’s where a lot of good work gets passed over; nothing wrong with the work, it just doesn’t fit my needs.

So, here’s some advice.

First, the people who get the most work have their own style. You can’t be generic- there’s too many people willing to crank out generic work and you don’t want to be in that competitive area (fighting for scraps). Your style is like a signature- it’s the way you draw a face or arrange a composition. It’s what makes you stand out. I’m always looking for style and unique signature- believe me, it’s VERY easy to spot.

Second, you need examples to show range. I only saw two works on your profile. I wouldn’t consider anyone with less than three, though I can get an idea of someone’s aesthetic in two or even one. Offer more gigs, even gigs you likely won’t do, just to show more examples. What’s peculiar to me is that your profile says you offer “Banner Design, Website Design, Card Design etc.” but you’re currently only showing offers to create banners. Where’s your card design? Two Banner designs? You need to put more out there. Add in a business card design. Add in a greeting card design. What is your strength? Is it all digital? Do you do any hand drawn work? Are you good with photography, fonts, graphics or some mix of all? What’s your favorite kind of work? Where are examples of it? What work (doodles, valentine’s cards, banners for friends) got you into this? Where are examples of that?

Third, your design examples are too literal. ‘Your name here’ asks the client to use THEIR imagination. Do you know why you design? Because YOU’RE the one with the imagination; That’s what they’re hiring you for. They have no idea how good their banner, logo, card or whatever can look until you show them an example. Where’s the kick-tail banner? Where’s the business card they feel confident giving out- heck, where’s the business card they feel terrible giving out because they want to keep them all to themselves?

THAT’S what I’m looking for, and THAT’S what’s missing. THAT’S what you need to do.

I’m attaching an example of my business card. The actual design is at 600dpi, so there’s pixelation in the attached that isn’t on the card. The lines on the card are very clear. They’re printed on incredibly thick stock. I designed it. I HATE giving them out because they are art. All art should feel that way. If you don’t treasure it like gold, then what are you giving the client? Is your example work gold that you could barely part with? That’s what makes art valuable.

As for tips like, ‘check your grammar and spelling on your profile page’, let me tell you, that matters and it doesn’t. I’m considering a couple of Argentinian illustrators who mangle the English language but their work is excellent. At the end of the day, this is a visual business and the final design speaks louder and clearer than words. If Salvadore Dali or Monet magically came back from beyond and would design work for you, would you turn them away if they misspelled stuff on their profile page, or even couldn’t speak English?

Whatever brought you into this, be it a card for a friend, the curve of a signature, a doodle on a sunny day… TAP INTO THAT and show us that here. That’s what sells… if you’re willing to part with it.

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Although I’ve typed a storm, let me add one thing.

The worst thing you can do in design is doubt your gut instincts or devalue your aesthetic. My designs are clean and bold, perhaps masculine, and serious, but they’re nowhere near the only word in design because there are probably infinite ways to design.

Let’s take a quick look at a great design example. This is a true story.

There was a Japanese guy who sold coin purses. One day, he realized he could sell more to preteen girls if he had something cute on them.

In 1974, he contacted a designer and she gave him a design. It was a simple cartoonish character. We know her design as ‘Hello Kitty’.

I don’t have to tell you how ubiquitous the design is- it’s on everything and everywhere. It’s nothing more than what any high school kid could make for their little sister in an hour, but it works. Do you think the artist (Yuko Shimizu) ever thought her cartoon would be on champagne bottles and cars? What if she thought, ‘a cute cat isn’t serious enough.’?

Trust your design instincts- they will help develop your signature quicker.

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