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Dont be this kind of buyer


adrianpwijaya
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Making extra cash doing while doing what you like is fun, that’s why some people are on fiverr. But there are things buyers need to understand. Every gig is for Sellers to decide, whether to take your order or not. Just because we would do something for 5$ doesn’t exempt you from common courtesy. Please don’t be this kind of buyer, always contact the seller to discuss your idea prior to ordering, if you don’t like the terms and conditions, go find others that suit you better. We’re all adults here, is it really necessary to curse and use foul language? This also goes vice versa for the seller. If you wanna scam, do it somewhere else. We’re trying to make fiverr a better community.

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well, I can’t see the whole conversation in this screenshot but yeah no one gets the right for abusing and cussing even whether someone is working for $5 or for free. If seller is cheap for working at $5 then buyer is also cheap for buying service at $5. Ask him to hire Tony Stark next time lolz 🙂

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"Please don’t be this kind of buyer, always contact the seller to discuss your idea prior to ordering"



No! I am SICK of being CONTACTED. “Hi, I need a brand name.” “Hi, can you write an e-mail about this.” Really? Place an Order! Why is that so hard? If I can’t do it, I will cancel. If I need something else, I will tell you.



I’m sure I’m not the only seller here who’s sick of answering questions. Come on, buyers! This is not rocket science. If the name of the gig is “I will do X.” Don’t write to the seller asking, “do you do X.” Questions for the seller should only be made when there’s doubt, 99% of the questions I get are from people that didn’t read the entire gig. That didn’t look at the gig extras. They are lazy people, if there wasn’t money on the line, I would ignore them.


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Reply to @fastcopywriter: Haha, I can relate, Most times people tell me this idea for a character design and im like “Cool!” then ask a few quesitons and they answer back almost immediately.

Then when I say, "Awesome, ok whenever your ready go ahead and order a gig so we can get this started…"



I never hear back from them… Sad face…😦

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I agree that your potential buyer was rude, and cussing is never acceptable in this kind of situation. But you could have been a bit more polite in your wording too. For example, when you wrote “my gig my rules” and “go find other seller,” you could have been a little nicer about it–even if the buyer was being a jerk. You could have said, "Sorry, I can’t help you at that price. I suggest finding another seller who can."



It’s sales, and the customer might not always be right but if you want to do business at all, you have to learn to hold your own temper. That’s not to say you were wrong, but you might tweak your message a bit in these situations so that you don’t fuel the fire.

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Interesting post indeed.



I believe it goes both ways. Sometimes it is absolutely necessary to contact the seller before placing the order to ensure that he/she can meet the requirements. However, if the seller is a level 2 or top rated seller, then I think the reviews should be more than sufficient to establish credibility and competency.

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Reply to @fastcopywriter: I agree with this every time you post it or something similar!



A bulk of sellers aren’t actually offering anything for $5, that’s why they want contact. They need to explain why they can’t do it for $5 and upsell. At this point, I don’t even care about them breaking the theoretical ToS, but I do care that they keep encouraging people to pester me!



If you want or need pre-order contact, stick it in your profile and descriptions, but allow the rest of us to use the system the way it’s intended to get some actual work done. Please & thank you! 🙂

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Reply to @itsyourthing: this seller is one of those sellers, his gig states:



Minimum order is 25$ including : unlimited revisions, multiple file types delivery, and alternates within the same concept.

I have the rights to decline 5$ order or to immediately cancel the order (especially those that do not contact me prior to ordering)



So that is exactly what he is doing, and probably why the buyer was not happy, as he didn’t get anything for $5.


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Reply to @sue_mcl: I wonder what would happen to Fiverrland if all sellers ‘invoked the right’ to refuse $5 orders.



I think it’s @fastcopywriter who often says that the market will sort itself (paraphrasing there) if sellers start upping their base gig fees, and I agree to an extent - the cheap gigs will always be appealing - but folks will stop bothering to even come to the $5 store if there are only 3 items out of millions that are $5.



The market will always sort itself, but Fiverr may not be a part of it, if they dismiss their entire advantage and marketing strategy of offering $5 product & services.

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Reply to @itsyourthing: I’m a huge believer in supply and demand, when Fiverr began, I’m told everything had to be $5 and there were no gig extras. But Fiverr has progressed over time, it has realize that a communist-style economy doesn’t work. Capitalism works because it allows real competition instead of false equality.



One of my role models writes 50 words for $5, but then if you want other stuff, he hits you with lots of gig extras. The guy is not even a TRS yet, but last time I checked he had 49 in his queue, and you can be they’re not all $5 orders.



I think Fiverr will keep thriving. Look at it this way, do you remember Hi5, MySpace, why did they fail while Facebook succeeded? Clearly Facebook is better. Same goes for Fiverr. Same reason when we search online, we’re more likely to use Google than Yahoo or AskJeeves or Lycos (if I remember the name correctly).



The only thing that might hurt Fiverr is if they increase their commission, if they start charging a membership fee. Fiverr needs to skin from the top. Actors will gladly pay 10%-15% commission to their agents, but when they see an ad in the paper promising Hollywood jobs for $50, they know that’s a lie. The same lesson applies to job seekers who see ads for resume bombardments, I felt into that trap, had my resume bombarded to 1,500 HR people, did not get a single call.


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Reply to @fastcopywriter: I agree with your MySpace/Facebook example, but draw the opposite conclusion from it. Fiverr is MySpace and no matter what they change, ‘Facebook’ will come along. The only reason Fiverr’s still growing is because it still reads as dirt cheap and they’re bending over backwards to raise their numbers… before the inevitable sale. It took off because everything was $5. It maintained and grew because of access to a huge, cheap, international workforce.



That cheap workforce is now jumping into the capitalist pool, which is driving up rates across the board. So the novelty factor of a $5 shop is done & dusted. And the lifespan of anything online is only about 5 years anyway.

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Reply to @itsyourthing: I’ve seen Fiverr clones, there’s one where the initial gig starts at $10, some where you can start at $20, but their traffic is laughable. No traffic = no sales.



Fiverr to me is Facebook, the platform is beautiful and easy to use, editing gigs is easy, the reason we see some sellers demanding $10-$20 upfront is because they don’t understand the concept of volume sales. These people aren’t capitalists, Walmart knows “Always Low Prices” means “always more customers.” They know the average American doesn’t care if something is made in China. Want to pay $60-$80 for New Balance shoes made in America? Be my guest, but you’re gonna find me shopping the $10-$20 shoes at Payless or $180 Nikes if someone gives me a $200 giftcard for my birthday.



Fiverr is the same, yesterday I had a client from Nigeria, he’s starting a chicken and fish kebab place. He can’t afford $100, but he can afford $15.



Is the lifestyle of anything online is 5-years? Maybe that’s the rule for crappy companies, but good companies will survive and thrive.

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