Jump to content

Dear buyers: apparently I should be open with you about my prices


Guest willedridge

Recommended Posts

Reply to @fastcopywriter: Well said. If I got excited about how much money copywriters make and setup a gig. Get the latest word processing software and and write a description. I would be horrible. You have to do something you have skills at doing. I am horrible at writing and it would take me forever to get 500 words or even 50 words. I would need to charge for my time, 200 or 300 dollars. And it would still be horrible. I would then whine because I put so much effort into the work when they ask for a mutual cancellation. The value was in the finished product not the effort I put into it.



Do something you can do really really do well. Not just because you see it working.



That sums up most of people’s new gig problems.



See my post was probably filled with errors and a proofed it a couple of times. 🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @professorcowan: I would push through. I did that to build my first 100 orders. (first 100 orders on each gig). You need the reviews to establish your account. Think of it as an investment in your business. I had many $5 gigs that took hours when I started. One order, I went back and forth on a $5.00 gig for an entire month. Change after change. The only thing that stopped it was the trade show it was going to be used at. Yes a complete kiosk video at a trade show for $5.00. If you invest the time it will work. You will then be able to move to provide $5 per slide. Or even $5.00 for 1 slide and $100 for 10 slides. First get the traffic. Invest the time. Constantly evaluate your descriptions and learn from each order. I want to encourage you and let you know it will pay off. Keep 100% Reviews.



It will take about 100 orders to figure a gig out. You may then decide that it doesn’t work for you. I have 3 or 4 gigs that are paused because they are not the best fit for me right now. It’s kind of fun to work through them. I also rotate gigs for my sanity, while still taking custom orders from repeat customers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @professorcowan: Hi there. I agree, some people just don’t get it. Although I went and looked at your gig and there were a few things I noticed, so just sharing for food for thought 🙂



You say the basic gig is for only 3 slides, and to just order more gigs if you want more slides. That in an of itself may be an issue. Someone else posted in the forums the other day about a client who sent a full manuscript for editing where they normally do just chapters of book. There is a lot more work to be done on a larger more full bodied project with regard to pacing and design and getting the message across in a clear and effective manner than just 3 slides. Perhaps you might want to say if it’s a project above X slides, please contact you first.



You also say that for gig extras you will write the copy or do an info graphic…but there are no actual gig extras on your job, just the basic $5 gig. So it also seems like someone could order more quantities of gigs but not be clear about what they need and what info to give. As a buyer when I buy something I get a note of what the seller needs. I am not sure if you have extras if you can share different notes and requests for what you need, or perhaps it may be helpful to look at the info you are requesting and make it more detailed so you get details back in a way that works for you better.



I do agree, there are many people that just do not understand what it means to buy any type of design services. They do not know how to give instructions and say what is in their mind what they see, etc., etc.



ALso, one little flaw with the aspect of everyone putting gig extras for 1 day delivery (which I did not see on your gig by the way) was that sellers have to account for time zones. As a buyer if I ask for one day delivery, that to me means my time zone one day, so when buyers and sellers are 7 hours or more apart from one another I think it’s an issue. I wonder if that is an issue for others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest itsyourthing

Reply to @willedridge: I really don’t think Fiverr is the outlet for you. There’s nothing wrong with any seller setting their own value for the time & effort of any gig - $5 to $5000, but you have to offer something for $5 here.



I promise that if you genuinely believe doing that you will ‘tarnish your reputation’ this isn’t the place for you. And using your Fiverr account as a promotional page won’t work either. That theoretical tarnish is created by association with the site, not the quality of work presented or provided. 🙂



There are some very qualified professionals that work here, and yes, they’re usually the ones the don’t get fairly compensated for their time and skills, BUT, they hone their gigs to be as equitable as possible. They use Fiverr for what it is.



This is just a pet peeve of mine; I hate it when people place a concrete value on something based solely upon their own personal perception and/or abilities. I happen to be quick. I intentionally only sell Fiverr gigs that I can do exceptionally well, in a short time. Note, “exceptionally well”. If it’s a time commitment for me, I don’t sell it here. I deal with large clients and large projects elsewhere.



Fiverr, again, for me, is very much a sideline; just to pick up a few dollars now and again. There are sellers here who operate very much as a fully-fledged business, and they do quality work at higher dollar amounts, but I’m stressing again, they craft their gigs to enable them to provide a discount that appeals to the Fiverr market. A market that is largely folks looking for cheap work, fast, but also includes what you would consider reputable, legitimate clients looking for quality.



Now that I’ve babbled (brevity in social conversation is not something I do quickly!), I’ll sum it up to say, that Fiverr has to be treated as what it is, or you’ll just be frustrated and wasting even more time.



My crap gig is a #2-sided coin. The writing is strong enough, but it doesn’t convert. Copywriting fail or epic joke? If it provides a laugh, it’s worth the 15 minutes(!) I dedicated to creating it. 😉

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @landongrace: Even when you know what you’re good at, you have to consider sub categories. I’ve been writing since my first published piece 32 years ago although that isn’t as impressive as it looks. I wrote and submitted all kinds of copy but at first publications were unpaid and years apart. My earliest successes and first paid works were short fiction, news articles, reviews and how-tos.



I realized over time that I was not an editor and I benefit from another set of eyes for polish. I’m not a copywriter or a poet. I worked full time for 5 years as a technical writer and I did well. On Fiverr I had to narrow it more. I take too long to write fiction and I don’t write fiction genres on command so I deleted that gig. I’m good at research and have tons of hobbies so niche artcles turned out best for me so far.



Most of my clients want creative, personal and accurately researched content that is original and keyword rich. They don’t care about who or whom. For those that do I have an extra that gives me time and funds to outsource extra proofreading. I say all that to point out that when people create gigs on Fiverr and want to build a good reputation and repeat buyers, it isn’t usually enough to just be a writer, a designer, or an artist. Specializing gives you edge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest willedridge

Reply to @professorcowan: Hey Prof, thanks for your kind words!



Quite frankly, it is your fault you did the work for that amount, however, I’ve been in that position too.



I’ve fallen for lots of tricks:

  • Doing work for free on the promise of work in the future
  • Doing free samples
  • Working on commission
  • Discounts for big orders etc



    It really sucks but you never fail, you succeed or you learn. So if you’ve learnt something from it then that’s worth a lot more than the $80 you lost out on.



    I don’t advise you to follow all of my advice (if any) because I have a habit of bending the rules until I get in trouble… I blame my Dad for that… and for my charm (he was irish).

    There are good sellers here like landongrace, sincere18 and itsyourthing that can all provide much better advice than I can though I’d just like to advise that you don’t sell yourself short. 🙂



    All the best,

    Will


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest itsyourthing
willedridge said: Quite frankly, it is your fault you did the work for that amount, however, I've been in that position too.

 

I've fallen for lots of tricks:

Let's not be harsh :) It's not being "tricked", it can be tenacity, promotional strategy, ignorance, boredom and a bunch or other things - most of which are actually pro-active and intended to have some return on investment. If only it always worked!

 

But yeah, if you go that route and it bites you on the backside, there's no-one else to blame. Cuss, learn and move on. :)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @willedridge: "43 jobs at $5 is still only $215 dollars."



They’re not all $5 jobs. Yesterday I did 10 jobs and made $80. On March 10 I had three big orders ($65, $25, $50) and 5 small ones ($5), and I made a total of $132 after Fiverr’s commission. So if I’m doing great, imagine how Levi Newman is doing.



"In our first month we generated £46, 590 (about $70,000) in revenue and that’s in the first iteration before we start split testing the direct mailpieces or the web content."



I respect that. If you want to make money by having a lot of s***e sessions, in person meetings, a ton of research, lots of back and forth, endless revisions, plenty of cold calling, networking, asking clients to give you referrals, that’s your business.



It isn’t mine.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @landongrace: I agree, while I took a ProTools class at Miami Ad School, the most I can do is splice an audio file, that’s why my radio commercial writing service doesn’t offer recordings or audio editing of any kind. Ironically, some of my competition will write and record the radio, and the client that wants everything for $5 will hire them. Those that believe in getting a script before getting a production will hire me. 🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  1. All the research in the world doesn’t guarantee you’ll write a great headline or a great ad. I have written a lot of great ads. Maybe when I was a young, ignorant, Miami Ad School student, I would have to write 50 headlines to find a good one. Those days are over, now that I know how to edit myself, I can do great work at great speed.

     

     

  2. If my clients are happy, that’s all it matters. They’ll find out if it’s effective or not soon enough. If it is, they will order more. I have a lot of repeat customers. I assure you they’re happy with my work.

     

     

  3. Magicians don’t reveal their tricks, why should copywriters? When I order a logo, I have no idea if the designer spent 5 minutes or 5 hours, and frankly, I don’t care. If I like the logo, that’s all it matters. It’s the same with writing.

     

     

     

    Will, my experience is different than yours. One of my greatest headlines I wrote for a real estate development was “Our price reductions don’t come with lifestyle reductions.” Now maybe you hate that headline, that headline did not win any awards, but that client was spending $150 million dollars a year in advertising, that headline ended up becoming a billboard, not just a print ad, and that headline was written in 15 minutes. I wrote 15, my creative director loved 3 of them, the client picked 1.

     

     

     

    Of course, I don’t know how many houses that headline sold. I do know that advertising is only one part of the sales process. My car ads may bring people to the dealership, but it’s the car salesman that sells the car.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @fastcopywriter: but on Fiverr gigs are priced by project. I would be willing to bet if you were needing a logo designed and the cost was $75 and hour you would want an estimate about how long it would take before agreeing to contract that person. And the designer would absolutely need to give you a quote so they know that when it takes them 5 hours you are going to shell out $375.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @sincere18: I wouldn’t even hire someone that charges by the hour because that person is gonna want to work as many hours as possible.



If it’s a maid that charges $25/hour to clean your house, she’s gonna take 3-hours and cost me $75, or I can hire a cheaper one for $65 regardless of the time it takes her.



Advertising agencies pay people salaries because creative people sometimes have to work long hours and they hate paying for overtime.



Is it worth it? At the office a man has no freedom. Can’t wear flip flops, can’t wear shorts (even in Florida), can’t be late, can’t leave early, can’t do Fiverr at work, and all that BS for what? $57,000 a year? Maybe $90,000 if you’re really good?



I’d rather do Fiverr.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @fastcopywriter: actually, many agencies and freelancers charge by the hour and it’s the job of a freelancer to be able to estimate and quote well. A freelancer, well, let me rephrase that, a respectable and very good freelancer doesn’t just take their sweet old time and take longer.



Some freelancers do prefer to charge by project and they get the customers that want the same thing. IT’s whatever works for you. I’ve done both, freelanced per project and charging by the hour. I prefer by the hour, because it always ends up that the client might change their mind, want to go in a different direction and then the $250 job turns into nearly slave labor wages, so one would never get to $57K per year in that case, LOL 🙂



I don’t mind making less and being able to ear flip flops and work at whatever time I want, so if that was what you meant, then yeah, it works.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to @sincere18: I agree, hourly and fix wages exist for a reason. What I learned from freelancing is this.


  1. Always get paid up front, at least 10%, 20%.

  2. There should always be a kill fee so if the client doesn’t like your work, you get to keep something.


  3. If you’re not getting paid by the hour, revisions should be limited to one or two. Then if they want more revisions, they pay for extras.



    I had a lot of negative experiences in big and small advertising agencies. Ironically, my first real job in advertising was great, the boss took the creative team out to lunch 2-3 days a week, he paid with the company credit card which had a $1,000 fund to entertain clients. He took us to the auto show, during work hours, art galleries, and when I say lunches I don’t mean McDonalds, I mean nice restaurants. Our lunches were 1-2 hours, and they always involved going to Starbucks before going back to work. He knew how to live, and was very creative as hell. I didn’t mind driving that guy to the airport (OK, I did mind, but I was young and didn’t know what monsters I would later on encounter).



    After he left and I got jobs at other places, the other jobs sucked for the most part. One time we were working overtime and my CD says, “hey guys, what would you like for dinner?” and what does the Senior Art Director reply? “Subway.” Seriously? Subway is what you eat when you’re by yourself, when the boss is paying, you choose something more expensive.



    Now my last boss, Ly, he was a nicer guy. Always giving me and others candy, chocolates, was very honest and forthright, but alas, the account people hated my guts. Why? Because I kept forgetting their names.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...