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Too many adjustments requests on a single revision


mr3ddesign

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Hi

I have a buyer that requests too many photo editing adjustments on a single revision. I have defined 11 free revisions for his order, but in each revision he types in a list of many adjustments that need to be applied on the image. How can I notify the buyer politely to avoid requesting new adjustments or ask him to pay more for new adjustments? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you

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2 hours ago, mr3ddesign said:

Hi

I have a buyer that requests too many photo editing adjustments on a single revision. I have defined 11 free revisions for his order, but in each revision he types in a list of many adjustments that need to be applied on the image. How can I notify the buyer politely to avoid requesting new adjustments or ask him to pay more for new adjustments? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you

It really helps if you've already laid out what counts as a revision in your custom offer or gig description. If you haven't, buyers might twist things around and claim they thought it meant something else.

Always be crystal clear about what a revision entails—like, is one revision just for tweaking a tiny detail, or does it cover a complete style overhaul? I've worked with agencies that define revisions in all sorts of ways—from minor edits to completely changing course with the design. So it's really important to get that across before the order begins, so you can agree on a price that actually reflects the work involved. 

Details like that matter.

If you didn't clarify this upfront, chances are the buyer might assume these things were included, and they might not take kindly to any surprises. If you put your foot down, prepare for negative feedback if you don't meet their expectations. 

But with that said, I'm not a fan of working for free.  I'd politely explain to the buyer that a revision means a small tweak to the original design, not a full makeover. But like I said: you risk a negative review if you go down this route. 

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2 minutes ago, mr3ddesign said:

Hi

I have a buyer that requests too many photo editing adjustments on a single revision. I have defined 11 free revisions for his order, but in each revision he types in a list of many adjustments that need to be applied on the image. How can I notify the buyer politely to avoid requesting new adjustments or ask him to pay more for new adjustments? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you

You can get help from the Fiverr Help Center and inform them about your situation. In a brief discussion, for example, the buyer is always revised, and you have already given him 11 revisions, but he wants one after another. Then, finally, you take a screenshot of some activity about revisions. I think you understand my speech.

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On 1/22/2024 at 3:15 PM, vickieito said:

Hi @Kesha - Will there be any changes to the post limit (and will private messages continue to count towards the post limit)? I know several regulars on the forum who still have their 5-post-a-day limit. Some of these regulars have been on the forum for years now. Is there any way for this post limit to be removed for these users?

It would also be nice for the private messages not to count towards the post limit. If we do limit the private messages, it can have its own daily limit.

 

5 hours ago, smashradio said:

It really helps if you've already laid out what counts as a revision in your custom offer or gig description. If you haven't, buyers might twist things around and claim they thought it meant something else.

Always be crystal clear about what a revision entails—like, is one revision just for tweaking a tiny detail, or does it cover a complete style overhaul? I've worked with agencies that define revisions in all sorts of ways—from minor edits to completely changing course with the design. So it's really important to get that across before the order begins, so you can agree on a price that actually reflects the work involved. 

Details like that matter.

If you didn't clarify this upfront, chances are the buyer might assume these things were included, and they might not take kindly to any surprises. If you put your foot down, prepare for negative feedback if you don't meet their expectations. 

But with that said, I'm not a fan of working for free.  I'd politely explain to the buyer that a revision means a small tweak to the original design, not a full makeover. But like I said: you risk a negative review if you go down this route. 

Thank you a lot, @smashradio for your brief speech about this revision topic. It will be very helpful for all members in this forum. I think your advice will have a positive outlook for a seller and their service, which can be measured through a revision.

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19 hours ago, smashradio said:

It really helps if you've already laid out what counts as a revision in your custom offer or gig description. If you haven't, buyers might twist things around and claim they thought it meant something else.

Always be crystal clear about what a revision entails—like, is one revision just for tweaking a tiny detail, or does it cover a complete style overhaul? I've worked with agencies that define revisions in all sorts of ways—from minor edits to completely changing course with the design. So it's really important to get that across before the order begins, so you can agree on a price that actually reflects the work involved. 

Details like that matter.

If you didn't clarify this upfront, chances are the buyer might assume these things were included, and they might not take kindly to any surprises. If you put your foot down, prepare for negative feedback if you don't meet their expectations. 

But with that said, I'm not a fan of working for free.  I'd politely explain to the buyer that a revision means a small tweak to the original design, not a full makeover. But like I said: you risk a negative review if you go down this route. 

Dear @smashradioThank you so much for the detailed explanation. Your mean can be clearly understood.

The adjustments he asks me to do are count as relatively tiny adjustments, so I think it might be better not to tell the buyer anything about this subject. unless I realize he is asking for more complex revisions. Hope my experience would help other sellers to be more clear in their gigs description, especially when they are giving details about their revisions service. Regards, Mohammadreza

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