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Experiment : 22 Days As A Designer On Fiverr. Cash Cow?


joseph013

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A documentation of my experiences, sales, profits, and detailed results of my first 22 days as a designer listed on Fiverr.



https://fragglesrock



It has been getting great interest. The results were surprising. Figured this would be a better place than any within the community to share.



I tried to keep it 100% transparent and unbiased.



Sheriff’s Note: Off Fiverr links are not allowed.

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I see no mention of extras being involved in your math(Although you do mention later on about being a Level 1 seller and finally being able to offer extras.). For those that don’t properly utilize the extras it’s not really worth the time. If you utilize the extras and build up a reasonable sized client-base here on Fiverr, it’s well worth the effort. I think the biggest issue with Fiverr’s model is that it takes too long to reach Level 1 status, and then Level 2 which actually keeps some sellers from realizing the true potential of the website. The best bet imo for new sellers is to sell just enough for a Level 1 status, then just enough for a Level 2. Then when you get to the point of Level 2 is when you should “pause” all your gigs, and revamp them to support the focus outside of the $5 orders, and go more towards the extras gigs.



Another note is I see no mention of figuring in advertising costs. Although you may have been lucky to land the right clients in your professional work-place, how much did it cost you in advertising to get those clients? If you were so lucky as to not spend much at all and land them that’s great, but a majority of people might be spending hundreds, if not thousands of dollars. Sometimes even then it doesn’t pay off.



I think if anything, Fiverr is good and bad. The rates are low but the quantity of orders & potential leads for not spending anything are higher and thus, the profit margin is bigger if you build on it and establish yourself properly and take the time to build your service around the extras. Not to say that users should stick solely with Fiverr, but they can always start up their own page & find fresh clients while maintaining the clients here on Fiverr. I think a good balance of Fiverr & a professional business imo is a great idea. There is down-time in any business, and Fiverr would be a good supplemental income.

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Reply to @madmoo:



I understand where you are coming from. As a designer who has charged anywhere between $50.00 USD to $300.00 USD for the same kind of artwork you can only see why I would view Fiverr as a hobbyist market. I mean no offense at all. If you develop a solid client base and are happy within Fiverr than by all means continue to do so. I certainly see how gig extras can increase your payouts.



I prefer to do my own invoicing and negotiations though.



Maybe I was wrong about fees as you have more experience in cashing out larger amounts.



I never stated that I did not care about my customers. I was simply suppose to see if a revenue could be generated successfully at an almost passive rate. The article was updated to mention that I made sure to produce something respectable for each customer as they did make a purchase. My reviews have reflected this.



I understand these are your stomping grounds and I will definitely play by the rules =) … Again I stated my stance as strictly transparent during the experiment. I have always intended to abide by Fiverr’s TOS and will do so.



Thanks for reading.

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@freelancemm



Yeah, I didn’t do any advertising. I am aware that I was lucky to get such orders without any marketing of the gig. My first customers admitted they just took a risk based off the quality of my examples. I have reached level 1 gig extras now and I may play around with it to see how my numbers compare to my first 22 days.



Fiverr is not bad at all. The result of the experiment just shows that I wouldn’t count on it as a main source of income for an already established professional designer.



As someone who performs design services at higher rates for a living, it will always be strange to me perform work for $5.00 on Fiverr.



Does not mean I cant enjoy doing a gig from time to time.

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Reply to @madmoo:



Yeah after re-reading the article I saw how that tone could have came across. It has been adjusted with an update. Didn’t intend to give off that vibe.



Fiverr has a lot of potential to be many different things for many different people I agree. To hear that you were able to quit your job is awesome. Have you written about it anywhere ? That would be a pretty awesome story.



I have actually heard many people complain about the SEO services on Fiverr elsewhere. But I’ve seen they definitely have quite a large amount of sales as you have mentioned.



It seems that Fiverr is what it is depending on the person using it.



Thanks so much for reading the article and sharing your opinion with me. It’s good to see from all angles.

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Reply to @joseph013:


joseph013 said: Fiverr is not bad at all. The result of the experiment just shows that I wouldn't count on it as a main source of income for an already established professional designer.


I would agree with that. It's still a good supplemental income on slow times though outside of your main income and nice to have as a kind of security money. When I get more established in the business world though there is still a level of profit margin to be made on the lower end of things but I suppose SEO is a totally different market than design work.
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