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Can buyers download files before they click on revision?


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Hello 🙂 

I have been googling this question a few times now but never found anything.

I am an illustrator here on fiverr and I have a client that is on his 3rd revision now (i give 3 for free). Weirdly he likes the illustration but just wants the colors to be different. He purchased 2 designs and now after the 2nd revision he wants another color change and was writing, that he wants to sell the illustrations as a set of 4. 

Now I'm wondering if clients can download files before they click on revision and use the "free" revisions to get more illustrations? 

I assumed that fiverr puts a watermark on the files before clients mark the order as complete but now I'm wondering. 

Thanks for your answers in advance 🙂 

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4 hours ago, alaecs said:

Now I'm wondering if clients can download files before they click on revision

Of course they can download the files. How can they know they need a revision if they don't even see the files? So of course a person can download every file you send. It's the nature of this website. If it's unfinished, maybe add your own watermark. I don't think Fiverr adds any watermarks, but I am a writer not a designer, so maybe a designer knows that. 

Edited by donnovan86
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4 hours ago, alaecs said:

I am an illustrator here on fiverr and I have a client that is on his 3rd revision now (i give 3 for free). Weirdly he likes the illustration but just wants the colors to be different. He purchased 2 designs and now after the 2nd revision he wants another color change and was writing, that he wants to sell the illustrations as a set of 4. 

Maybe you could type up and save a template text on how you define revisions to put in your FAQ and add to custom offers (many people won't read as far as the FAQ).

Personally, I see revisions as corrections of something that's actually wrong (like, client said they want a red car in the image, and you delivered a blue one), not an additional other colour version, or additional words that they forgot or "forgot" to mention before accepting a custom offer, etc. Then you could say that different versions were not included in the package they purchased, but that you'd be happy to provide as many as they'd want for $x as a Gig Extra or in a separate custom offer. 

How "strict" you want to be in sticking to your revision definition, is up to you, either way, if it's not much work, or you're sure the customer really just forgot a sentence vs "forgetting" it, for example, it might be less fuss and even save you time=money compared to the maybe just little money you'd take for the Gig Extra, and might get you happy regular customers, to just do it. IMO, it makes the most sense to set your revision rules as you see fit (while keeping them common sense enough that it should convince any normal person that they aren't randomly deliberate), and apply them, or not, on case-by-case basis.

Just an extreme example to illustrate the point, it's probably not worth to potentially anger a good regular customer who never tries to bargain and leaves great feedback over a tiny revision request that's, strictly speaking, not really a revision, but if there's a regular customer who regularly orders for a small amount and requests "revisions" that are worth half the order price, and takes it for granted that you just do it, it might be too annoying to not speak up (of course, politely and reasonably).

With new customers, you need to use your gut feeling and growing experience. Sometimes, people who somehow "trouble" you, can turn out great customers if you "take the risk" of working for them, or explain to them why X isn't a revision, or why y is a perfectly reasonably price, etc. And some people simply aren't your ideal customers. The more ideal for you customers you acquire, the easier you can let go of the less than ideal ones. And that's not always about the money they are or aren't willing to pay but often about how much additional time they cost you compared to your "average customer" or how much you enjoy, or not, interacting with them.

I got a little off-topic, perhaps, I hope I didn't carry coals to Newcastle there, in any case, the point is, define your revision rules, make as sure as possible that the customers know them or at least can know them, doing their due diligence, and mention them while discussing a custom offer or paste them into the custom offer, and have them in Gig description/FAQ for direct orders if you take any, so you can at least point at them if there's a case where you want to put your foot down on revisions.

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/31/2023 at 1:22 PM, miiila said:

With new customers, you need to use your gut feeling and growing experience. Sometimes, people who somehow "trouble" you, can turn out great customers if you "take the risk" of working for them, or explain to them why X isn't a revision, or why y is a perfectly reasonably price, etc. And some people simply aren't your ideal customers. The more ideal for you customers you acquire, the easier you can let go of the less than ideal ones. And that's not always about the money they are or aren't willing to pay but often about how much additional time they cost you compared to your "average customer" or how much you enjoy, or not, interacting with them.

Thank you so much for your answer. I think you're totally right with the gut feeling. What I learned on Fiverr after working as a freelancer for about half a year now is that some buyers are completely new to Fiverr and just don't know it better. But I also had some buyers that intentionally use revisions to get extra work done without having to pay for it. 

For example with the buyer I was writing about. He ordered 2 designs from me but added a completely new "order" with every revision. At the end he paid for 2 designs but got 5 (he got the other 3 for free because of the revisions). 

To understand it better: I offer unique wall art for buyers who resell my artwork on their online stores. So when they order a piece I illustrate it and deliver it. often times buyes then say "oh I just don't like it, I want a new one". And because of the free revisions I have to create a niew piece of art. But at the end when I upload the new design buyers end up with 2 pieces of art but only paid for one. So it happened a few times now that they just said they don't like it just to get more free art. 

I guess my mistake was that I thought that after completing an order the buyer only can download the most recent revision. But that's not true. The buyers can download all of the previous delivered designs too. Buyers can then request revisions and if they for exampe want an artwork in a different color they have 2 different designs at the end with just paying for one. 

The problem is that I can't do anything about it because buyers can download all the previous versions and often times I end up working for free. 

 

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Hi there.

As fellow designer.., A long as you put fiverr watermark on the delivery, they should have a problem selling your art.

Plus.., it's not easy to remove colored watermark. It tooks times and effort. 

Second, They can't download the source files, until they accept the delivery.

Third, always reduce the resolution for artwork like this. For example, 1000x1000 pixel are good enough for people to check the delivery. 

BUT 1000x1000 is too small for printing quality resolution.

 

Maybe this can help 🙂

 

 

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2 hours ago, ridwansugi said:

Hi there.

As fellow designer.., A long as you put fiverr watermark on the delivery, they should have a problem selling your art.

Plus.., it's not easy to remove colored watermark. It tooks times and effort. 

Second, They can't download the source files, until they accept the delivery.

Third, always reduce the resolution for artwork like this. For example, 1000x1000 pixel are good enough for people to check the delivery. 

BUT 1000x1000 is too small for printing quality resolution.

 

Maybe this can help 🙂

 

 

Thanks a lot for your help!

So do you reduce the quality just to show your work in the chat so they can approve or do you also deliver your work with reduced quality? I can imagine delivering reduced quality images can make buyers angry. 

Also I didn't know you can't download source files until accepting the delivery. That's so good to know! 

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