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" Promoted Gigs " option is good or Bad ... ???? I'm confused about that ......... Those who have opened it, please share your experience. What kind of benefits did you get? Thanks in advance


angel_web_dev
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For me personally it does make a difference so it definitely works for me. Last month (if the numbers are correct but I assume Fiverr wouldn't con me!), I spend $26 but the revenue I gained from it was $210. So in my eyes that's a good investment! 

You have to see for yourself if it works or not, experiment a bit! Although I do agree somewhat with @filipdevaere, since it's also not completely transparent how it works. Especially the Cost-Per-Click and whether auto is better than putting in an amount yourself. Yes they had a presentation about it a while ago but it remains a bit vague for me. 

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If your gigs are optimized and performing well (with good deliveries and seller stats), Promoted Gigs should be helpful. I have seen 10-15 times return on my Promoted Gigs. I also like the option of turning it off and on whenever I need it. I don't want to run promotions when I am sleeping, running errands, off of work, or busy with orders.

However, if your gigs are not performing well, you might end up spending more than what you make (this is based on the posts I see from other sellers on the forum).

Edited by vickieito
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I don't share my internal business figures in public, but what I will say is that my ROI in July was 2,757.14%. I earned roughly 50 times what I invested in promoted gigs last month. It's a no-brainer. Then again, the success of your promoted gigs will depend on the competition and their promotions + your own and their performance in the marketplace. Your mileage will vary. 

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1 hour ago, smashradio said:

I don't share my internal business figures in public... I earned roughly 50 times what I invested in promoted gigs last month.

Neither do I, but my results have been similar to yours. And I am very happy with those results.

1 hour ago, smashradio said:

It's a no-brainer.

Indeed it is. 🙂 

1 hour ago, smashradio said:

the success of your promoted gigs will depend on the competition and their promotions + your own and their performance in the marketplace. Your mileage will vary.

I think this is somethig a lot of newer sellers forget. They want massive success, without the performance to back it up. The only way Promoted Gigs works in anyone's favor, is if they are already a high-performing seller. Success is always earned, it is never given. Therefore, Promoted Gigs are also earned. 

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@filipdevaere - the only way you would know that is if they didn't have the promoted badge or if you asked them. I turned off my Promoted Gigs when I started getting in Fiverr Choice orders (that's how I knew it was time to turn Promoted Gigs off).  I also didn't leave Promoted Gigs on all the time (I turned it off when I was sleeping, doing errands, not working, or busy with other orders). It didn't make sense to promote then.

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1 hour ago, filipdevaere said:

@newsmike

Hey Mike,
How can you know if a buyer that clicked on your gig and bought it would not have done the same on a standard gig instead of a promoted gig?
I receive continuously a lot of work and even need to decline work because I just have too many orders. I don't need to use promoted gigs. 

I just know that when an order is placed after someone clicks on your gig when they promote it, there is a flag that shows that. Can we say they might have found you otherwise, who knows. But I always get a good return and the entire promotion expense is able to be written off anyway as a business expense.  

I'm curious, if you have to decline work why would you not raise rates? I mean there are TRS sellers in my vertical who read all day long at 150 words for $10, and I can't imagine why they stay at those rates. I've pushed my rate so that I'm charging 12 times that for the same amount of words and instead of reading for 6 hours a day, I bill the same in 30 minutes.  

Edited by newsmike
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16 hours ago, jonbaas said:

Neither do I, but my results have been similar to yours. And I am very happy with those results.

It varies from month to month, of course. Last month I landed a big project from it. Still, it shows the potential of investing in your business, something that would never occur to amateurs because they want results without putting in the effort. 

I've had months with poor results as well, and since I know that it's based on my performance, it's a great indicator to measure buyer satisfaction rate. Is your gig promotion going well? You probably have a high BSR. Is it going down? A project in the last 90 days probably landed you some negative feedback. Just a hidden advantage of promoted gigs, on top of the marketing itself. 

16 hours ago, jonbaas said:

I think this is somethig a lot of newer sellers forget. They want massive success, without the performance to back it up. The only way Promoted Gigs works in anyone's favor, is if they are already a high-performing seller. Success is always earned, it is never given. Therefore, Promoted Gigs are also earned. 

Bingo! 

12 hours ago, filipdevaere said:

@newsmike

Hey Mike,
How can you know if a buyer that clicked on your gig and bought it would not have done the same on a standard gig instead of a promoted gig?
I receive continuously a lot of work and even need to decline work because I just have too many orders. I don't need to use promoted gigs. 

I'm not Mike, but I'm going to respond anyway. You can't know for sure, just like a company can't say for sure if I would have clicked on their organic search result if they didn't have an ad on the top. Not knowing for sure doesn't equate to the marketing not being effective. 

You say you have to decline work due to the number of orders you get. That would be a perfect time to increase your rates (and I can almost guarantee that @newsmike will agree with me on this. You'll get fewer sales with increased rates, but they'll be worth more. Using promoted gigs to amplify the results from that strategy could mean less work and more money. But if you don't want to use promoted gigs and prefer to work the way you do, that's completely fine. We all have to do what we feel is best. 

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6 minutes ago, filipdevaere said:

I increased my rates already.

That's great! But if you're still getting too much work, maybe there's room for more? I'm not here to tell you how to price your services, so don't get me wrong. 😁 Promoted gigs have been awesome for me, and it's a no-brainer to use it if you can. But it might not be the right choice for you, and that's perfectly fine. Every business is unique. 

Edited by smashradio
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58 minutes ago, filipdevaere said:

@smashradio

At the moment, in some services that I offer, I have almost no competition anymore. For sure, if I go too high in price, I will lose customers, and they will order again from the few competitors that I still have. 

That's a valid fear and something I also struggle with when increasing rates. I hate to see clients dropping off, but over the years, I've gradually increased my rates and lost some clients. I've said goodbye to clients who are not willing to pay what I'm worth and hello to new clients who are. It's a revolving door –gradually turning – and every time it makes a round, the quality of my regular clients goes up, as does the work and the money I earn for doing it. But I feel a bit sad whenever I look through my contacts list and see some of the clients I used to work with. Some of them spent thousands of dollars with me and were great clients to work with, yet they are no longer here because my new rates didn't match their budget. That's the nature of business, and I'm glad I'm no longer stuck at the point where I'm afraid of charging what I'm worth. I used to be (and I'm by no means saying that you are) and it can be a tough descicion to let go of a client, especially if they have spent a lot over the years. 

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