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What do you consider the 10 most important factors on Fiverr?


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What actions, key metrics and activities do you consider to be the most important for a better position in Fiverr listings? If possible including an approximate percentage of importance of each. Maybe it will be interesting if several of us share our opinion.

Here is my opinion (not 100% complete, considering that there are more factors that are not in the top 10):

% of importance - Topic
15 - Repeat business score
10 - Gig design
10 - Sales (in $) per month
10 - Reviews. Number, rate and average.
8 - Social media
8 - Low cancellation rate
7 - Respond as soon and as much as possible
5 - Use of keywords
5 - Seller level
5 - Portfolio

 

What do you think?

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1 hour ago, agenciawem said:

10- Gig design
10 - Sales (in $) per month
10 - Reviews. Number, rate and average.
8 - Social media
5 - Use of keywords
5 - Seller level
5 - Portfolio

I would remove all that from your list. 
Gig design and portfolio has no way of being measured by fiverr algorithm. It’s only for your clients to see if they like your style or not 

sales person month, well that also depend on how much you were shown. It’s kinda chicken and egg dilemma on who came first. 
 

reviews don’t matter so much anymore especially public ones, otherwise only gigs with thousands sales would’ve been on the first page and we see even new gigs with zero reviews being promoted there.

Hidden reviews yes, they count a lot 

 

Keywords and your level completely useless, they just put you in the right search category but on which page you will be shown depend on your performance. 
 

I would recommend for you to check topics here on the forum called “fiverr 3.0” and “fiverr 3.1” to dig deeper into that 

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When I go searching for a seller, I'm looking through multiple pages, adding any "prospect" to a List as I go. I don't stop at the first seller or only check the top row.  Being good or bad at "getting ranked" won't matter for me since I'm checking everyone in the results. If someone seems good, I'll find them, and they'll probably get a task from me.

In every search, I set a maximum budget and turn Commercial License on. If a seller doesn't offer Commercial License, and even their Basic tier is above my maximum; all the SEO tricks in the world won't get them into my search results. Repeat Business, 5-Star Reviews, 1-Hr Response Speed are all worth 0% without that.

From the search results, I'll skim down looking for a "quality" gig image and title. If the gig image has a lot of un-necessary effects or embellishments, I'm probably skipping it. If it's laid out like a pamphlet or powerpoint slide, I'm probably skipping it. If the gig description has spelling or grammar mistakes, I'm probably skipping it. Generally, the best looking 3 or 4 gigs per page get added to a List.

Once I've gone through all the pages, I go back to the list. From there I start opening gigs and actually reading them. If there are a bunch of shenanigans in the description and FAQ about Commerical Use, like if the seller says they "actually retain this or that" and I need to seek permission for it; I move them to a different list which I use in place of an Ignore button. As a warning to those people; per customer support, the gig description is not contract. The gig details (the checkmarks that show in the order) are. The buyer gets all rights unless you expressly decline to offer them by turning off Commercial Rights (or the gig type itself has additional rules, like Broadcast Rights for Voice Over). 

If the gig also lacks details, like if it has a bare bones information; I take that to mean the person doesn't know what to say, and I take that to mean the person doesn't know what's actually involved in the task. They get moved to the Ignore list.

Portfolio and reviews matter. I do take them into consideration. But for me it's more a prioritization thing than if I will or won't work with someone. I trust a deep portfolio more than one with just the default three. I want to see how someone handles custom work and how the buyer received it. If the price and quality are about the same, I'll use the person with more data than the new seller. But, I will go with a new seller with no reviews if they have a very low risk price.

Then, I'll probably contact the seller with a description of a task, to see if they're available/interested. At that point they have about a week to get back to me before I move the task to a different seller. If they get back to me and are speaking very low level english, I'm probably going to make an excuse to politely back out, because I'm presuming they'll get something about the task details wrong. That used to have fun results sometimes, but now I'm spending more per order so it's not worth the giggles to see what I get.

TL;DR:
- Have the gig set up so it will match what a buyer is likely looking for. (Also, consider some Blue Ocean options; make your gig different from others to catch more specialized buyers who are digging through too many generic results. As an example. Artists; a lot of sellers wanna draw people and places, and the gigs say people and places. But I need people who draw things, and that set of results is small even though most artists can likely do it. I keep having to ask character artists to draw tools and vehicles because there are so few gigs that aren't about characters.)
- Have a polished/clean gig image and description (don't cram things in, don't add superfluous embellishments).
- Have a thorough but concise gig description. Call out what you need from the buyer, describe the subtle options available to them. Ensure it is written well.
- Respond in a reasonable time with at least a semblance of proper spelling and grammar.

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