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Why is my GIG conversion rate going down, but impressions and clicks going up?


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45 minutes ago, nicks_voice said:

I'm looking for some opinions on my Fiverr gig. My conversion rate is sitting at a low 0.64%, but my impressions and clicks are rising everyday, I'm not sure why.

https://www.fiverr.com/nicks_voice/record-a-pro-voice-over-in-24-hours-for-cheap

If your clicks go up, it's only natural that your conversion goes down. 

A conversion is when someone clicks on your gig and decides to purchase it. You're converting that potential buyer into a paying customer. 

With that in mind, we know that if your gig suddenly gains more visibility on Fiverr, more people will click on your gig. That does not mean that more people end up ordering your gig

If you do things right, your conversion rate should stay about the same over the medium term and go up in the long term. But you may get 50 clicks one day, but only one order. That would be a 2% conversion rate. If you had half that – 25 clicks – the day before and still made one sale, that would be a 4% conversion rate. 

Since a conversion happens after someone clicks your gig, you should consider the following if you want to improve your conversion rate: 

I wrote that guide with precisely this in mind after having experimented for a long time with different descriptions, gig thumbnails, videos, pricing, and so on. 

The idea is that you need to improve what the potential buyer sees after they have clicked on your gig. That's where you turn prospects into clients. 

I think your problem is the focus on price. 

Let's say I'm a buyer. I browse Fiverr, looking for my next voice-over talent. Among all the 20-dollar gigs, I see your five-dollar gig. I'm curious, so I click on it to compare it to the others. 

What do I find? A gig that focuses on being "cheap." That doesn't go well with "high-quality." People know that you rarely can get anything of "high quality" for next to nothing. Quality takes experience, professionalism, and talent taking their time to understand their message, identity, and audience. 

Does that come cheap? Would you – a five-dollar seller – be able to invest the same into a professional career as a voice-over actor in terms of coaching, gear, studio acoustics, and time? Most likely not. 

I'm not saying this to criticize the quality of your voice-overs. I'm saying this to criticize the brand image that you put forward. You're "cheap"! The word is even in your gig title and is probably not helping you. 

Buyers might not see that word in the search result because the character limit hides it. But once they click your gig, the term "cheap" is in the headline. 

Then I move on to your gig description. You mention "affordable" twice and, even worse, "cheap" twice. 

Look at the definition of the word "cheap" for a second. Pay attention to the part in yellow: 

image.png.35ab958f02df4483b6b63460a31537a5.png

Back to me, in my role as the potential buyer. 

I look at your gig. Then I look at a gig priced slightly higher – 20 bucks in this case. It's still a great value, considering that the going market rate for the same voice-over outside of Fiverr would probably be in the hundreds or thousands of dollars...

The seller doesn't mention cheap. Or affordable. They focus on the quality, experience, and what it brings to the table for me as a buyer. They acknowledge my fear by telling me their experience allows them to understand my brand. My values. And that I don't have to keep wasting time looking for others: If I want that experience, passion, drive, and high-quality audio recorded in a professional studio, I've already found it.

They back this up by mentioning some big brands they have worked with. Brands that have already trusted them. Most likely brands that I, as a buyer, trust.

So what if the price is 20 instead of 5? I'm spending 15 more, but I'm getting a person who understands me and will put in that time and effort. Who can do so because they don't charge five dollars (less than a cup of coffee in many countries.) 

This ended up becoming a long post, so I'm gonna stop here. But I hope I have demonstrated to you that value is about more than price and that offering something CHEAP is equal to saying, "I'm not serious about this. I just want some pocket money. I'm not a talented or experienced voice actor. I'm not investing in my business." 

Even if you don't mean it, that's the message you're sending across. 

Best of luck, man! 

Edited by smashradio
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30 minutes ago, smashradio said:

 

If your clicks go up, it's only natural that your conversion goes down. 

A conversion is when someone clicks on your gig and decides to purchase it. You're converting that potential buyer into a paying customer. 

With that in mind, we know that if your gig suddenly gains more visibility on Fiverr, more people will click on your gig. That does not mean that more people end up ordering your gig

If you do things right, your conversion rate should stay about the same over the medium term and go up in the long term. But you may get 50 clicks one day, but only one order. That would be a 2% conversion rate. If you had half that – 25 clicks – the day before and still made one sale, that would be a 4% conversion rate. 

Since a conversion happens after someone clicks your gig, you should consider the following if you want to improve your conversion rate: 

 

I wrote that guide with precisely this in mind after having experimented for a long time with different descriptions, gig thumbnails, videos, pricing, and so on. 

The idea is that you need to improve what the potential buyer sees after they have clicked on your gig. That's where you turn prospects into clients. 

I think your problem is the focus on price. 

Let's say I'm a buyer. I browse Fiverr, looking for my next voice-over talent. Among all the 20-dollar gigs, I see your five-dollar gig. I'm curious, so I click on it to compare it to the others. 

What do I find? A gig that focuses on being "cheap." That doesn't go well with "high-quality." People know that you rarely can get anything of "high quality" for next to nothing. Quality takes experience, professionalism, and talent taking their time to understand their message, identity, and audience. 

Does that come cheap? Would you – a five-dollar seller – be able to invest the same into a professional career as a voice-over actor in terms of coaching, gear, studio acoustics, and time? Most likely not. 

I'm not saying this to criticize the quality of your voice-overs. I'm saying this to criticize the brand image that you put forward. You're "cheap"! The word is even in your gig title and is probably not helping you. 

Buyers might not see that word in the search result because the character limit hides it. But once they click your gig, the term "cheap" is in the headline. 

Then I move on to your gig description. You mention "affordable" twice and, even worse, "cheap" twice. 

Look at the definition of the word "cheap" for a second. Pay attention to the part in yellow: 

image.png.35ab958f02df4483b6b63460a31537a5.png

Back to me, in my role as the potential buyer. 

I look at your gig. Then I look at a gig priced slightly higher – 20 bucks in this case. It's still a great value, considering that the going market rate for the same voice-over outside of Fiverr would probably be in the hundreds or thousands of dollars...

The seller doesn't mention cheap. Or affordable. They focus on the quality, experience, and what it brings to the table for me as a buyer. They acknowledge my fear by telling me their experience allows them to understand my brand. My values. And that I don't have to keep wasting time looking for others: If I want that experience, passion, drive, and high-quality audio recorded in a professional studio, I've already found it.

They back this up by mentioning some big brands they have worked with. Brands that have already trusted them. Most likely brands that I, as a buyer, trust.

So what if the price is 20 instead of 5? I'm spending 15 more, but I'm getting a person who understands me and will put in that time and effort. Who can do so because they don't charge five dollars (less than a cup of coffee in many countries.) 

This ended up becoming a long post, so I'm gonna stop here. But I hope I have demonstrated to you that value is about more than price and that offering something CHEAP is equal to saying, "I'm not serious about this. I just want some pocket money. I'm not a talented or experienced voice actor. I'm not investing in my business." 

Even if you don't mean it, that's the message you're sending across. 

Best of luck, man! 

Thanks for the feedback! I'm going to give this a try. I really appreciate the outlook on how "cheap" looks. My initial idea was to capture buyers who are just starting out a youtube channel etc, and also to help boost the gig. I think I've got to a point where I can settle with a better title. Thanks again!

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1 hour ago, nicks_voice said:

Thanks for the feedback! I'm going to give this a try. I really appreciate the outlook on how "cheap" looks. My initial idea was to capture buyers who are just starting out a youtube channel etc, and also to help boost the gig. I think I've got to a point where I can settle with a better title. Thanks again!

Indeed, I believe you have. You can still offer affordable alternatives, though. How many words are there in a typical order for Youtube on your gigs? Because you can price additional words - so you could potentially charge only 5 bucks for each 250 words in addition to your base price (just an example). It might still capture the cheaper clients (if that's who you want to work with) but if you want to move up in the world of VO, you tend to get better clients at a higher price point. 

Super low pricing can be a good way to attract buyers when you're new, but I think it has a lot of problems, too. For instance, you tend to attract buyers that are difficult to work with, demanding individuals and penny-pinchers with a 5-dollar gig. 

So I think you should raise your base price as well, not just the title.  My Success Manager told me pretty directly that Fiverr favors higher priced gigs in search results these days. After all, it's better for Fiverr if they can sell a 20-dollar-gig instead of a 5-dollar-gig. 

Edited by smashradio
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23 minutes ago, smashradio said:

How many words are there in a typical order for Youtube on your gigs?

I average about 800-1200 words per order.

26 minutes ago, smashradio said:

so you could potentially charge only 5 bucks for each 250 words in addition to your base price (just an example).

I've thought of this before, but I'm worried I'll get a new trend of buyers asking for custom offers saying "why should I pay $10 for a 100 word script VS the same amount for a 500 word script" and forcing me to make custom offers.

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