Jump to content
  • 0

Is it ok to withdraw my custom offer and to raise significantly my quote?


ernesto_beta
 Share

Question

Hi. Last friday I got a quote request from a new potential buyer. I sent her a custom offer based on my gig rates, and based on the fact that my 3 buyers were agencies/intermediaries, not the client himself/herself. Then, after a little research, I realized that I was approached by the very client, which is a company that operates in 2 countries across the Atlantic and is expanding to a 3rd country. I feel I billed her too little. Is it ok to withdraw my offer and raise my quote almost by 100%? That is, from $100 to $190. She hasn't accepted it nor replied to my offer yet. I've already withdrawn my first offer only for a change in delivery time. Now I'm thinking of withdrawing it again for a raise in price. Is it ok or would it give her a bad first impression? What would you recommed? I don't want to lose this client, buy I don't want to be underpaid for this and potential further jobs with her. I'm not that experienced here, just a new seller.

Thank you, people!

Edited by ernesto_beta
making myself more clear
  • Like 3
  • Confused 4
  • Up 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 5

I would run as fast as I could from a seller that is increasing price just like that only by finding out who am I as a client. 
 

That is unprofessional and will be considered a TOS violation by fiverr as a bait and switch. 
Your prices based on your gig, you decided to put that price, you decided it’s worth your time no matter who is the client. I’m surprised that you even think it’s ethical to raise your prices just like that just because who the client is. 
Just because I’m wearing Tiffany bracelet it doesn’t mean that I will buy a bottle of water for 10$ when it cost 1$. 🤷‍♀️ 
your client is also not blind, they can see what you offer in your gigs and what is your price there. 

  • Like 8
  • Up 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1
4 hours ago, ernesto_beta said:

Is it ok or would it give her a bad first impression? What would you recommed?

It would certainly come across as unprofessional and even rude. If you've quoted them a rate and the actual scope of the order hasn't changed, that's your responsibility. 

If you feel the rate is too low, you should increase your base rates. If I was your buyer I would just skip to the next seller if something like this happened. 

There's nothing wrong with increasing your rates, or charging more when a project reach is larger. But do so in your first quote. If I have a voice over client who needs to use my voice in a national TV commercial (big reach) I'll charge more than from the local builder who just wants a website video. I do so via different rights packages (commercial rights for any and all business use except broadcast/paid ads and broadcast rights for buyout, paid ads and tv/radio). 

That means I can still allow the reach/market to determine the rate, but I'm being transparent about it from the getgo. 

In this instance, you haven't done so, and I would recommend sticking to the price, making your buyer happy, and move on. 

Before your next order, make sure you know the following before making a custom offer, to avoid this in the future: 

  • Who the client is
  • What your voice will be used for
  • Which market it will be used in
  • For how long

That allows you to provide an accurate price based not only on wordcount, but also usage. 

Best of luck from a fellow voice over talent! 

Edited by smashradio
  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1
3 hours ago, ernesto_beta said:

What if the client returns for another job in the future? Should I still stick to this price if I don't change my gig rate? I feel increasing my gig rates would affect my gig performance in respect to small buyers. Or should I first get to the next level after a few more orders?

Happy to help! 

I have increased my rates multiple times over the years, both to match my competition, my own experience and offering, and due to price increases elsewhere (gotta pay them bills, you know!). 

If you don't change your gig rate, you should stick to the price you have on your gig. Actually, increasing your gig price can be positive for your gig performance.

I have it on good authority – from my success manager at FIverr – that Fiverr loves pricier gigs more than cheap gigs. This is because it makes Fiverr more money, basically, even though there's more to it than that. It all comes down to "value" and depends on how satisfied your buyers are, as well. 

So by increasing your rates, your telling Fiverr and buyers that you believe your service is worth more. Sure, it might turn a few lowballers off, but you shouldn't want those clients, anyway. I charge a bit less than my competition, but even so, I don't want to work for nothing. Fiverr is not about having the cheapest possible gig anymore. 

Five dollar gigs will attract the worst buyers out there. The ones who is going to make your life as a seller difficult. That's because they are hunting for the cheapest possible bargon out there, and they don't care if they abuse the talent in the process. I highly recommend upping your price a bit. I suggest looking at your closest competition here on Fiverr, and price yourself around 15% below the top rated and level 2 sellers.

Remember: cheap also means lower quality. If you want the best steak for that perfect date dinner, you won't look for the cheapest possible piece of meat you can find. Same goes for services. 

And you don't have to increase your base price by that much. You can set it to 10 or 15 (just examples since I haven't checked your competition) but set up Broadcast Rights as an optional extra, and charge 50 or even 100 (whatever you feel is right) for that. Then, when a client comes along with a project that's going to be used with a large audience, you can explain that this requires "broadcast rights". Voilá – you've increased your rate significantly, without increasing your base rate too much. 

Best of luck 😄 

 

 

Edited by smashradio
  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

@mariashtelle1, @smashradio thank you very much for your answers and your time! I've learned something very important and you saved me from making a great mistake!

1 hour ago, smashradio said:

In this instance, you haven't done so, and I would recommend sticking to the price, making your buyer happy, and move on.

Thank you! What if the client returns for another job in the future? Should I still stick to this price if I don't change my gig rate? I feel increasing my gig rates would affect my gig performance in respect to small buyers. Or should I first get to the next level after a few more orders?

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • -1

I afraid, that is not at all a professional approach. There should be logical explanation why you want to increase the offer pricing. If the company/buyer agrees the new pricing then it is okay but without any explanation please do not do this. Be committed to your pricing and your overall professionalism. 

 

Thanks 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...