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1 hour ago, sanimjubaer said:

Dream to make money it will make you effective because money is the best motivation end of the day

I started my Fiverr profile in January 2014 along with other freelancing profiles because I was fired from my job (the company had financial issues and eventually went bankrupt a year later). Despite that, I had some money set aside so I wasn't in a rush to try and find another job. I thought about freelancing and decided to create profiles on as many platforms as I could. I was a writer even before becoming a freelancer, and I always liked the craft and welcomed feedback and criticism, after all it leads to improvement.

So when I started on Fiverr, my focus was to take on diverse topics to learn more, research and thus fulfill my desire to improve my knowledge and also continue writing. Even today, I do this because I love this craft, it's never gotten old for me and I hope it never will. So yes, the idea here is that you shouldn't start a freelancing profile just for the money. If anything dude.. it will lead you to severe disappointment. Create gigs that you are passionate about, over deliver and help others, and then success comes on its own. That would be my advice. Whether you take it or just ignore it, that's up to you.

Good luck!

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Tips to becoming a better freelancer (or platitudes in E major):

 

1. Pick your coffee wisely. 

2. The softer the chair - the softer the mind. 

3. Know when to say no. Also, know when to say “tacos.” 

4. Be the toughest boss you’ve ever worked for. And the most inappropriate. 

5. A buyer who haggles your prices doesn’t respect you. A seller who allows it, doesn’t respect themself. You’ll lose either way. 

6. No one has ever made a sale by complaining for twenty minutes. 

7. Oh, you’re in sales. No matter what you think you’re in, you’re in sales. 

8. You can judge success by the quality of your sweatpants. 

9. In school, it’s against the rules for someone else to do your homework. That’s still true. 

10. Your competition doesn’t know anywhere close to what they think they know. And the only competition is yourself. 

11. Know when other freelancers are convincing you into mediocrity. 

12. Go to the tos section. Read it. Print it. Write on it: “knowing this, I’ve decided not to complain about these rules in an unproductive manner.” 

13. Not everyone should be self employed. Scratch that. Almost no one should be self employed. 

14. If you can’t be honest about the quality of your own work - you can’t anticipate your own value. 

15. “Cheers” is still an awesome show. That’s not a freelancing tip, but it’s good to know. 

16. Decide right now, “in my business, do I work with or for the customer.” Knowing the difference will spare you significant heartache. 

17. Marketing is storytelling, trading and the game of show and tell. Yes. It’s basically kindergarten. 

18. Have a dedicated office and adhere to company policies. Even if that office happens to sell espresso. 

19. Returns (cancelations) are equal to your inability to qualify customers. 

20. Assuming the sell is a micro-linguistic sport. It begins with you converting questions to requests (“tell me how I can help you”) and ends with converting suggestions to recommendations (“I recommend the third tier package, I’ve sent you the invoice here”). 

21. A long term client is someone you educate. 

22. One bad day doesn’t make a habit. Cookies. Cookies make a habit. 

23. In every project, your client works for the same company that you do. 

24. There’s no amount of preparation in the world that can fix “not trying.” 

25. Without a swivel chair you can never be your best self. 

26. Most professionals are amateurs in disguise. Be open about your progress and the correct clients will follow. 

27. Social media didn’t invent marketing. In fact, they’re not even very good at it. 

28. If you have to choose between making you happy or making the client happy, you’re in the wrong job. 

29. If it’s not all about the money, I can’t trust you to work hard for my idea. I don’t have time for you to philosophize on my dime. I don’t know a professional that does. 

30. I’ve made significant money doing all the things this forum says makes no money. Never model your success on what doesn’t work for people, but feel free to ask why - and do it better. 

31. There’s no problem that can’t be solved by studying the work of Nora Ephron.

32. Video does for your getting a client the same that it does for your keeping one. So smile and correspond accordingly. 

33. Sometimes the most polished look can fall into the void. Be human. 

34. Knowing how to finish a project is way better than knowing where to begin. 

35. If the voice in your head always agrees with you, fire them and get someone else. 

36. Motivation is overrated. Paying your bills is not. 

37. Do you know where your buyers go? If not, you’re not ready to freelance. 

38. A hamburger is just a sandwich with a makeover. 

39. Don’t convince people of your merit. Convince them of what you’d do with their task. 

40. Study this: invite - qualify - ask for the sale -overcome objections - close the sale.

 

Each of these terms are endless lessons on leverage and they are the difference between success and working a day job. 

 

41.  Giving a leading command is a “call to action.” Getting commanded at 40 is “calling your mother.” 

42. Present the things your customers need - not the things you need your customers to need. 

43. No one is better at being you, than you working to be a better you. Except for Dana Carvey. 

44. If professionalism is the standard - then start by being interesting. 

45. I didn’t anticipate writing 50 of these when I foolishly wrote the 21st one. 

46. Knowing someone’s name means graduating from being strangers (unless they want you to get in a van). 

47. An unhappy client is someone you don’t know enough about. 

48. Sometimes the days you don’t have a client - you learn more than on the days you do. 

49. It’s okay to be an amateur. It’s okay to just be starting. It’s even okay to advertise yourself as such. What people really want is someone that’s willing to work hard. Which seems more valuable to me. 

50. Redefine what success means to you every year. Keep it to yourself and don’t share it with anyone else.  Grade yourself on that singular vision. Be honest with yourself. Because my advice is only really worth the amount of your bills I’m willing to pay. And that ain’t much, hoss. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, damooch916 said:

Tips to becoming a better freelancer (or platitudes in E major):

 

1. Pick your coffee wisely. 

2. The softer the chair - the softer the mind. 

3. Know when to say no. Also, know when to say “tacos.” 

4. Be the toughest boss you’ve ever worked for. And the most inappropriate. 

5. A buyer who haggles your prices doesn’t respect you. A seller who allows it, doesn’t respect themself. You’ll lose either way. 

6. No one has ever made a sale by complaining for twenty minutes. 

7. Oh, you’re in sales. No matter what you think you’re in, you’re in sales. 

8. You can judge success by the quality of your sweatpants. 

9. In school, it’s against the rules for someone else to do your homework. That’s still true. 

10. Your competition doesn’t know anywhere close to what they think they know. And the only competition is yourself. 

11. Know when other freelancers are convincing you into mediocrity. 

12. Go to the tos section. Read it. Print it. Write on it: “knowing this, I’ve decided not to complain about these rules in an unproductive manner.” 

13. Not everyone should be self employed. Scratch that. Almost no one should be self employed. 

14. If you can’t be honest about the quality of your own work - you can’t anticipate your own value. 

15. “Cheers” is still an awesome show. That’s not a freelancing tip, but it’s good to know. 

16. Decide right now, “in my business, do I work with or for the customer.” Knowing the difference will spare you significant heartache. 

17. Marketing is storytelling, trading and the game of show and tell. Yes. It’s basically kindergarten. 

18. Have a dedicated office and adhere to company policies. Even if that office happens to sell espresso. 

19. Returns (cancelations) are equal to your inability to qualify customers. 

20. Assuming the sell is a micro-linguistic sport. It begins with you converting questions to requests (“tell me how I can help you”) and ends with converting suggestions to recommendations (“I recommend the third tier package, I’ve sent you the invoice here”). 

21. A long term client is someone you educate. 

22. One bad day doesn’t make a habit. Cookies. Cookies make a habit. 

23. In every project, your client works for the same company that you do. 

24. There’s no amount of preparation in the world that can fix “not trying.” 

25. Without a swivel chair you can never be your best self. 

26. Most professionals are amateurs in disguise. Be open about your progress and the correct clients will follow. 

27. Social media didn’t invent marketing. In fact, they’re not even very good at it. 

28. If you have to choose between making you happy or making the client happy, you’re in the wrong job. 

29. If it’s not all about the money, I can’t trust you to work hard for my idea. I don’t have time for you to philosophize on my dime. I don’t know a professional that does. 

30. I’ve made significant money doing all the things this forum says makes no money. Never model your success on what doesn’t work for people, but feel free to ask why - and do it better. 

31. There’s no problem that can’t be solved by studying the work of Nora Ephron.

32. Video does for your getting a client the same that it does for your keeping one. So smile and correspond accordingly. 

33. Sometimes the most polished look can fall into the void. Be human. 

34. Knowing how to finish a project is way better than knowing where to begin. 

35. If the voice in your head always agrees with you, fire them and get someone else. 

36. Motivation is overrated. Paying your bills is not. 

37. Do you know where your buyers go? If not, you’re not ready to freelance. 

38. A hamburger is just a sandwich with a makeover. 

39. Don’t convince people of your merit. Convince them of what you’d do with their task. 

40. Study this: invite - qualify - ask for the sale -overcome objections - close the sale.

 

Each of these terms are endless lessons on leverage and they are the difference between success and working a day job. 

 

41.  Giving a leading command is a “call to action.” Getting commanded at 40 is “calling your mother.” 

42. Present the things your customers need - not the things you need your customers to need. 

43. No one is better at being you, than you working to be a better you. Except for Dana Carvey. 

44. If professionalism is the standard - then start by being interesting. 

45. I didn’t anticipate writing 50 of these when I foolishly wrote the 21st one. 

46. Knowing someone’s name means graduating from being strangers (unless they want you to get in a van). 

47. An unhappy client is someone you don’t know enough about. 

48. Sometimes the days you don’t have a client - you learn more than on the days you do. 

49. It’s okay to be an amateur. It’s okay to just be starting. It’s even okay to advertise yourself as such. What people really want is someone that’s willing to work hard. Which seems more valuable to me. 

50. Redefine what success means to you every year. Keep it to yourself and don’t share it with anyone else.  Grade yourself on that singular vision. Be honest with yourself. Because my advice is only really worth the amount of your bills I’m willing to pay. And that ain’t much, hoss. 

 

 

I already hungry to read your suggested post 😂. But still thank you 🙂

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On 2/23/2022 at 3:57 PM, donnovan86 said:

I started my Fiverr profile in January 2014 along with other freelancing profiles because I was fired from my job (the company had financial issues and eventually went bankrupt a year later). Despite that, I had some money set aside so I wasn't in a rush to try and find another job. I thought about freelancing and decided to create profiles on as many platforms as I could. I was a writer even before becoming a freelancer, and I always liked the craft and welcomed feedback and criticism, after all it leads to improvement.

So when I started on Fiverr, my focus was to take on diverse topics to learn more, research and thus fulfill my desire to improve my knowledge and also continue writing. Even today, I do this because I love this craft, it's never gotten old for me and I hope it never will. So yes, the idea here is that you shouldn't start a freelancing profile just for the money. If anything dude.. it will lead you to severe disappointment. Create gigs that you are passionate about, over deliver and help others, and then success comes on its own. That would be my advice. Whether you take it or just ignore it, that's up to you.

Good luck!

I am fully agreed to you

On 2/23/2022 at 2:40 PM, imagination7413 said:

. . .

There is so much wrong with that perspective, I'm not sure I can comment safely. 

So end of the day what is your motivation?:classic_ninja:

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1 minute ago, sanimjubaer said:

So end of the day what is your motivation?

Put simply: "Love God and love thy neighbor"

My motivation is a genuine desire to help people. To want to see people improve and do better. To encourage people in their struggles and see them not just succeed, but thrive. My motivation is leaving the world just a little bit better than it was the day before, while keeping the future in mind.

That said, I cannot help people who will not help themselves. It takes a humbleness to admit one is wrong about something, and change is hard. If I see someone making an attempt, I'm far more likely to step up beside them and help them take another step.

I don't always succeed, as I'm only a broken human who's been burnt and betrayed in the past. Loving people is HARD, and sometimes people frustrate me to no end (love IS NOT tolerance). But part of growing and moving forward is recognizing one's own flaws and working to overcome them. And, yes, that does for me too.

Can money be a motivation? Sure. But anyone's reasons for doing anything can be compromised and twisted when one is in it for themselves. 

I earn money so that I will not be dependent or a burden on others in either the present or the future. I earn money so that I can help people in their time of need or hardship.

But if you notice: money is NOT the motivation, it's just the means to reach my goals. My motivation is love and compassion for people.

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21 hours ago, damooch916 said:

Tips to becoming a better freelancer (or platitudes in E major):

 

1. Pick your coffee wisely. 

2. The softer the chair - the softer the mind. 

3. Know when to say no. Also, know when to say “tacos.” 

4. Be the toughest boss you’ve ever worked for. And the most inappropriate. 

5. A buyer who haggles your prices doesn’t respect you. A seller who allows it, doesn’t respect themself. You’ll lose either way. 

6. No one has ever made a sale by complaining for twenty minutes. 

7. Oh, you’re in sales. No matter what you think you’re in, you’re in sales. 

8. You can judge success by the quality of your sweatpants. 

9. In school, it’s against the rules for someone else to do your homework. That’s still true. 

10. Your competition doesn’t know anywhere close to what they think they know. And the only competition is yourself. 

11. Know when other freelancers are convincing you into mediocrity. 

12. Go to the tos section. Read it. Print it. Write on it: “knowing this, I’ve decided not to complain about these rules in an unproductive manner.” 

13. Not everyone should be self employed. Scratch that. Almost no one should be self employed. 

14. If you can’t be honest about the quality of your own work - you can’t anticipate your own value. 

15. “Cheers” is still an awesome show. That’s not a freelancing tip, but it’s good to know. 

16. Decide right now, “in my business, do I work with or for the customer.” Knowing the difference will spare you significant heartache. 

17. Marketing is storytelling, trading and the game of show and tell. Yes. It’s basically kindergarten. 

18. Have a dedicated office and adhere to company policies. Even if that office happens to sell espresso. 

19. Returns (cancelations) are equal to your inability to qualify customers. 

20. Assuming the sell is a micro-linguistic sport. It begins with you converting questions to requests (“tell me how I can help you”) and ends with converting suggestions to recommendations (“I recommend the third tier package, I’ve sent you the invoice here”). 

21. A long term client is someone you educate. 

22. One bad day doesn’t make a habit. Cookies. Cookies make a habit. 

23. In every project, your client works for the same company that you do. 

24. There’s no amount of preparation in the world that can fix “not trying.” 

25. Without a swivel chair you can never be your best self. 

26. Most professionals are amateurs in disguise. Be open about your progress and the correct clients will follow. 

27. Social media didn’t invent marketing. In fact, they’re not even very good at it. 

28. If you have to choose between making you happy or making the client happy, you’re in the wrong job. 

29. If it’s not all about the money, I can’t trust you to work hard for my idea. I don’t have time for you to philosophize on my dime. I don’t know a professional that does. 

30. I’ve made significant money doing all the things this forum says makes no money. Never model your success on what doesn’t work for people, but feel free to ask why - and do it better. 

31. There’s no problem that can’t be solved by studying the work of Nora Ephron.

32. Video does for your getting a client the same that it does for your keeping one. So smile and correspond accordingly. 

33. Sometimes the most polished look can fall into the void. Be human. 

34. Knowing how to finish a project is way better than knowing where to begin. 

35. If the voice in your head always agrees with you, fire them and get someone else. 

36. Motivation is overrated. Paying your bills is not. 

37. Do you know where your buyers go? If not, you’re not ready to freelance. 

38. A hamburger is just a sandwich with a makeover. 

39. Don’t convince people of your merit. Convince them of what you’d do with their task. 

40. Study this: invite - qualify - ask for the sale -overcome objections - close the sale.

 

Each of these terms are endless lessons on leverage and they are the difference between success and working a day job. 

 

41.  Giving a leading command is a “call to action.” Getting commanded at 40 is “calling your mother.” 

42. Present the things your customers need - not the things you need your customers to need. 

43. No one is better at being you, than you working to be a better you. Except for Dana Carvey. 

44. If professionalism is the standard - then start by being interesting. 

45. I didn’t anticipate writing 50 of these when I foolishly wrote the 21st one. 

46. Knowing someone’s name means graduating from being strangers (unless they want you to get in a van). 

47. An unhappy client is someone you don’t know enough about. 

48. Sometimes the days you don’t have a client - you learn more than on the days you do. 

49. It’s okay to be an amateur. It’s okay to just be starting. It’s even okay to advertise yourself as such. What people really want is someone that’s willing to work hard. Which seems more valuable to me. 

50. Redefine what success means to you every year. Keep it to yourself and don’t share it with anyone else.  Grade yourself on that singular vision. Be honest with yourself. Because my advice is only really worth the amount of your bills I’m willing to pay. And that ain’t much, hoss. 

 

 

He just needs a gaming chair

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23 hours ago, damooch916 said:

Tips to becoming a better freelancer (or platitudes in E major):

 

1. Pick your coffee wisely. 

2. The softer the chair - the softer the mind. 

3. Know when to say no. Also, know when to say “tacos.” 

4. Be the toughest boss you’ve ever worked for. And the most inappropriate. 

5. A buyer who haggles your prices doesn’t respect you. A seller who allows it, doesn’t respect themself. You’ll lose either way. 

6. No one has ever made a sale by complaining for twenty minutes. 

7. Oh, you’re in sales. No matter what you think you’re in, you’re in sales. 

8. You can judge success by the quality of your sweatpants. 

9. In school, it’s against the rules for someone else to do your homework. That’s still true. 

10. Your competition doesn’t know anywhere close to what they think they know. And the only competition is yourself. 

11. Know when other freelancers are convincing you into mediocrity. 

12. Go to the tos section. Read it. Print it. Write on it: “knowing this, I’ve decided not to complain about these rules in an unproductive manner.” 

13. Not everyone should be self employed. Scratch that. Almost no one should be self employed. 

14. If you can’t be honest about the quality of your own work - you can’t anticipate your own value. 

15. “Cheers” is still an awesome show. That’s not a freelancing tip, but it’s good to know. 

16. Decide right now, “in my business, do I work with or for the customer.” Knowing the difference will spare you significant heartache. 

17. Marketing is storytelling, trading and the game of show and tell. Yes. It’s basically kindergarten. 

18. Have a dedicated office and adhere to company policies. Even if that office happens to sell espresso. 

19. Returns (cancelations) are equal to your inability to qualify customers. 

20. Assuming the sell is a micro-linguistic sport. It begins with you converting questions to requests (“tell me how I can help you”) and ends with converting suggestions to recommendations (“I recommend the third tier package, I’ve sent you the invoice here”). 

21. A long term client is someone you educate. 

22. One bad day doesn’t make a habit. Cookies. Cookies make a habit. 

23. In every project, your client works for the same company that you do. 

24. There’s no amount of preparation in the world that can fix “not trying.” 

25. Without a swivel chair you can never be your best self. 

26. Most professionals are amateurs in disguise. Be open about your progress and the correct clients will follow. 

27. Social media didn’t invent marketing. In fact, they’re not even very good at it. 

28. If you have to choose between making you happy or making the client happy, you’re in the wrong job. 

29. If it’s not all about the money, I can’t trust you to work hard for my idea. I don’t have time for you to philosophize on my dime. I don’t know a professional that does. 

30. I’ve made significant money doing all the things this forum says makes no money. Never model your success on what doesn’t work for people, but feel free to ask why - and do it better. 

31. There’s no problem that can’t be solved by studying the work of Nora Ephron.

32. Video does for your getting a client the same that it does for your keeping one. So smile and correspond accordingly. 

33. Sometimes the most polished look can fall into the void. Be human. 

34. Knowing how to finish a project is way better than knowing where to begin. 

35. If the voice in your head always agrees with you, fire them and get someone else. 

36. Motivation is overrated. Paying your bills is not. 

37. Do you know where your buyers go? If not, you’re not ready to freelance. 

38. A hamburger is just a sandwich with a makeover. 

39. Don’t convince people of your merit. Convince them of what you’d do with their task. 

40. Study this: invite - qualify - ask for the sale -overcome objections - close the sale.

 

Each of these terms are endless lessons on leverage and they are the difference between success and working a day job. 

 

41.  Giving a leading command is a “call to action.” Getting commanded at 40 is “calling your mother.” 

42. Present the things your customers need - not the things you need your customers to need. 

43. No one is better at being you, than you working to be a better you. Except for Dana Carvey. 

44. If professionalism is the standard - then start by being interesting. 

45. I didn’t anticipate writing 50 of these when I foolishly wrote the 21st one. 

46. Knowing someone’s name means graduating from being strangers (unless they want you to get in a van). 

47. An unhappy client is someone you don’t know enough about. 

48. Sometimes the days you don’t have a client - you learn more than on the days you do. 

49. It’s okay to be an amateur. It’s okay to just be starting. It’s even okay to advertise yourself as such. What people really want is someone that’s willing to work hard. Which seems more valuable to me. 

50. Redefine what success means to you every year. Keep it to yourself and don’t share it with anyone else.  Grade yourself on that singular vision. Be honest with yourself. Because my advice is only really worth the amount of your bills I’m willing to pay. And that ain’t much, hoss. 

 

 

Your list was really interesting to read. I can't say I grasped every single tip, but I'm sure I will with time. Thank you for these nuggets of wisdom 😁

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43 minutes ago, gajuseidi said:

nuggets of wisdom 😁

I’m not sure I would go as far as to describe this collection as wise (in as much as they’re probably just inherent truisms) but they’re actually things I do subscribe to. 
 

Feel free to ask me what any of them mean. Some are sales philosophy, some are repackaged musician lingo. Some are just flat out non-sense. 

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1. Trust yourself always;

2. Never be worried a lot, will decrease the performance;

3. Failures are normal and don't mean you're not good;

4. Try to find the path about your work being solo, I mean, never think about the grass of the neighbor, you're you, independent of others success, only thing about your work and try to not compete;

5. Always study analysis about your business, study your area and try to sometimes see newer things, it's good to the brain;

6. Anxiety is enemy.

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2 hours ago, freelancerexpo said:

always think about your dream and worked for it.

Dreams about vocation and travels motivate us, so we develop great tasks that help other people and mankind easily, since we are motivated, I believe that some people give up very soon, it's like a charge I saw about one guy almost getting the diamonds and stopped, other slowly will get it, sure that we should always look for our path and gains, never about the others, since they have their places, but us targetting our own success :) Dream motivates, work is the motivation in action 😄

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On 2/25/2022 at 2:35 AM, imagination7413 said:

Put simply: "Love God and love thy neighbor"

My motivation is a genuine desire to help people. To want to see people improve and do better. To encourage people in their struggles and see them not just succeed, but thrive. My motivation is leaving the world just a little bit better than it was the day before, while keeping the future in mind.

That said, I cannot help people who will not help themselves. It takes a humbleness to admit one is wrong about something, and change is hard. If I see someone making an attempt, I'm far more likely to step up beside them and help them take another step.

I don't always succeed, as I'm only a broken human who's been burnt and betrayed in the past. Loving people is HARD, and sometimes people frustrate me to no end (love IS NOT tolerance). But part of growing and moving forward is recognizing one's own flaws and working to overcome them. And, yes, that does for me too.

Can money be a motivation? Sure. But anyone's reasons for doing anything can be compromised and twisted when one is in it for themselves. 

I earn money so that I will not be dependent or a burden on others in either the present or the future. I earn money so that I can help people in their time of need or hardship.

But if you notice: money is NOT the motivation, it's just the means to reach my goals. My motivation is love and compassion for people.

Amazingly described what make you happy and motivated. Honestly, after reading your quote it force me rethink about what really motivated me. Thanks again. 

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Turn off the notification sound of Fiverr. I have the site open through the whole day when I work, and it kept beeping all the time, making me nervious and anxious....for years...till I figured out I can mute it 🤣 My life changed completelly hehe

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Even though when we think of "freelancing" we think of freedom and the way of a digital nomad—one of the best tips is to have some sort of time management. have a schedule you will be able to work with every day, whether early in the morning or late at night.

I also recommend always trying to get better at what you do so that you can charge more. Try to take different courses and learn skills that can help you. There are so many different resources online. 

If you focus on these 2 things, you will be well on your way! 🙂

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