Jump to content

What accent Should i follow? British or America.


Recommended Posts

I don't know where are you from but in my part of the world (South America) American english is the standard within learning and communication purposes. I think it'll depend basically of your country's proximity and possible links whether with the United States or UK. I dare to say that American english is more globalized but it may not be the case for some people and it would be great to get to know their perspective about it.

1 hour ago, limon_ahmed836 said:

British accent sounds very much fancy and delicious.

Sure it is. I enjoy it a lot by watching football and tv series, but damn, sometimes (maybe  most of the time) it's hard for me to understand a single word. 😆

 

  • Like 7
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you don't use any particular accent and want to use one, its better to use the American accent because it is easy to learn, understand and use. 

If its hard, you can create your own accent. just be sure to pronounce it clear and correct.

I use the British accent, because that's what I naturally picked up when I was young. It is harder, but I am comfortable with the British accent.

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a tricky and important question. The American accent can be beautiful, if you understand some of our newest phrases. Here is a list to enrich your linguistic experience, as well as pronunciations and examples of how I use these terms: 

Stick - Flicker (st-eh-ck fl-eh-ck-eerrr): Term of endearment when first meeting someone. 
Ex: “Well, how’s it going you old stick-flicker?”

Simon (s-eye-man): A person exhibiting obsessive attention to detail. 
Ex: “I don’t mean to be a real Simon here, but there’s some questions I’ve got to ask you.”

Tughard (tuh-guh-haar-duh): The act of doing one’s best. 
Ex: “The most important aspect of this job is that we really get together and tughard.” 
 

Numpily (Nuhm-pah-lee): The feeling of unity when people combine ideas. 
Ex: “ I instantly knew we would feel numpily with each other.” 
 

Johnny (Jah-Nee): A favor.
Ex: “For just a few bones, as a Johnny, I’ll make your husband problem go away Charlie-Do-Gooder.” 
 

Flunkerous (Fuh-luh- kor-uh’s): That voice in your head that screams “nooooo!” While you’re making regretful decisions at nightclubs in the Bible Belt, prior to the “ugly lights” coming on. 
Ex: “Cathy knew that his 80’s leather jacket and enjoyment of terrible music would later reveal his joblessness, yet she pushed passed the flunkerous voice of her mother inside her head.”
 

Dribblykittle (this-joke-is-too-long): The feeling of needing to use the restroom after having just used the restroom, but you’re on a date and you don’t want your company inventing nefarious actions, when really you just had too much coffee.
Ex: “Tod disregarded his dribblykittle and instead directed his focus toward the appetizer.” 
 

Let us stop there. This is quite a bit of information to take on in a single sitting. My advice, however, is to immediately incorporate these terms into your freelance correspondence. Fluently demonstrating language has less to do with accent and owes more to the proper use of modern phraseology. Armed with these words - you are certainly on your journey to being an expert at the “American Way” of speaking.  

  • Like 11
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, lazal2us said:

As a native Englishman I can easily spot someone a mile away trying to pull of an English accent.

You can always tell.  My category is full of people who claim to be able to do either UK or American Voice Overs, and they are generally terrible at both. Either their fake American sounds like a surfer dude, or their fake UK sounds like Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins. Authenticity is rare indeed.  

 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, damooch916 said:

This is a tricky and important question. The American accent can be beautiful, if you understand some of our newest phrases. Here is a list to enrich your linguistic experience, as well as pronunciations and examples of how I use these terms: 

Stick - Flicker (st-eh-ck fl-eh-ck-eerrr): Term of endearment when first meeting someone. 
Ex: “Well, how’s it going you old stick-flicker?”

Simon (s-eye-man): A person exhibiting obsessive attention to detail. 
Ex: “I don’t mean to be a real Simon here, but there’s some questions I’ve got to ask you.”

Tughard (tuh-guh-haar-duh): The act of doing one’s best. 
Ex: “The most important aspect of this job is that we really get together and tughard.” 
 

Numpily (Nuhm-pah-lee): The feeling of unity when people combine ideas. 
Ex: “ I instantly knew we would feel numpily with each other.” 
 

Johnny (Jah-Nee): A favor.
Ex: “For just a few bones, as a Johnny, I’ll make your husband problem go away Charlie-Do-Gooder.” 
 

Flunkerous (Fuh-luh- kor-uh’s): That voice in your head that screams “nooooo!” While you’re making regretful decisions at nightclubs in the Bible Belt, prior to the “ugly lights” coming on. 
Ex: “Cathy knew that his 80’s leather jacket and enjoyment of terrible music would later reveal his joblessness, yet she pushed passed the flunkerous voice of her mother inside her head.”
 

Dribblykittle (this-joke-is-too-long): The feeling of needing to use the restroom after having just used the restroom, but you’re on a date and you don’t want your company inventing nefarious actions, when really you just had too much coffee.
Ex: “Tod disregarded his dribblykittle and instead directed his focus toward the appetizer.” 
 

Let us stop there. This is quite a bit of information to take on in a single sitting. My advice, however, is to immediately incorporate these terms into your freelance correspondence. Fluently demonstrating language has less to do with accent and owes more to the proper use of modern phraseology. Armed with these words - you are certainly on your journey to being an expert at the “American Way” of speaking.  

Thanks Bro, I'll follow "American Way"

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, newsmike said:

My category is full of people who claim to be able to do either UK or American Voice Overs, and they are generally terrible at both.

I'm no voice actor ( in fact I don't like my voice) but my English (according to my US friends) is "pure west coast American English with some odd British accents sprinkled on top here and the for some reason." Not sure what that means, but I sometimes jokingly switch over to a fake British accent in the middle of the conversation and usually everyone laughs. I might be terrible with faking an accent, but hey at least I'm making people laugh!! 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, zeus777 said:

I'm no voice actor ( in fact I don't like my voice) but my English (according to my US friends) is "pure west coast American English with some odd British accents sprinkled on top here and the for some reason." Not sure what that means, but I sometimes jokingly switch over to a fake British accent in the middle of the conversation and usually everyone laughs. I might be terrible with faking an accent, but hey at least I'm making people laugh!! 

Accents can be fun to fool around with.  I just find it amazing that anyone would buy a VO from someone faking it, when they could for example get a great American accent from an actual American, or hire an actual Brit instead of someone doing their Daphne impression from Frasier.  

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, zeus777 said:

I'm no voice actor ( in fact I don't like my voice) but my English (according to my US friends) is "pure west coast American English with some odd British accents sprinkled on top here and the for some reason." Not sure what that means, but I sometimes jokingly switch over to a fake British accent in the middle of the conversation and usually everyone laughs. I might be terrible with faking an accent, but hey at least I'm making people laugh!! 

Thanks

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, newsmike said:

Accents can be fun to fool around with.  I just find it amazing that anyone would buy a VO from someone faking it, when they could for example get a great American accent from an actual American, or hire an actual Brit instead of someone doing their Daphne impression from Frasier.  

Thanks for your nice comment

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/10/2022 at 6:02 PM, lazal2us said:

Choose to do an American accent.

You do realize America has more than 100 accents?  That would be like me saying to someone from Indy I want to eat curry.  I personally can speak in at least a half dozen different American accents, some of which I can make so thick not even other native speaking Americans can understand. 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...