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Buyers, what gigs catch your attention?


katiamv
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Hi. I'm curious - what helps a buyer to make a decision when choosing between several sellers (except the rate, of course)? For example, one seller put his personal photo instead of gig image, another one made an eye-catching title, another one used stock images to present his gig. Maybe, it varies depending on a category, but anyway, it's interesting to know some common features.

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I'm a low-budget buyer. My tasks are generally small and simple but numerous. I farm out a lot of them just to 'see what I get', and then repeat with people who do well. I ignore stuff like ratings and seller level because I have the option to seek value from new sellers due to my higher budget and softer requirements. My process for scouting generally goes:
- Type in the relevant Keyword (ex, landscape or dungeons).
- Pick the appropriate Category (ex, Illustration or Creative Writing)
- Check the Category Option for Service Includes Commercial Use so that it's on
- Set the Seller Details to include countries where english is a common first language or countries which do not have a lot of sellers. If a country is generally not fluent english speaking and had a lot of sellers, I generally exclude it. Non-english countries with few sellers are included. Sure, I miss some potentially good sellers. But I quickly filter out a lot of bad sellers. It saves a bunch of time.
- Set a maximum budget
- For art, I open any gig in a new tab where their default image looks 'good enough'. If it's not art, I'm going to open any gig which is priced well enough.
- When I get into the gig, the first thing I check is their tiers to see that Commercial Use is actually available at the lowest tier.
- The next thing I check is to see if some delivered works are available in among the gig images.
- Gauge the gig based on delivered works,  and english fluency or domain knowledge displayed in the description.

Pass all that and I'll add the gig to a List, then contact people off the List whenever I need stuff.

Commercial Use is a hard filter. If it's not offered by default in the gig, I skip the seller as too complicated. I see a lot of people put their personal Commercial Use rules in an FAQ at the bottom to try and claim bits and pieces of the copyrights. According to what I've been told by Fiverr CS, only what's in the Gig/Offer is considered contract/agreement, and the Commercial Use rights are all rights. I skip anyone who complicates that side of the process, and have dropped sellers who changed their Commercial Use conditions.

Special note: I have never checked if a seller is online or not. I have never used the Online Sellers Only toggle. A seller has a day to get back to me before I start worrying, and likely a week to get back to me before I offer the task to someone else.

Edited by moikchap
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On 12/22/2021 at 2:01 AM, moikchap said:

I'm a low-budget buyer. My tasks are generally small and simple but numerous. I farm out a lot of them just to 'see what I get', and then repeat with people who do well. I ignore stuff like ratings and seller level because I have the option to seek value from new sellers due to my higher budget and softer requirements. My process for scouting generally goes:
- Type in the relevant Keyword (ex, landscape or dungeons).
- Pick the appropriate Category (ex, Illustration or Creative Writing)
- Check the Category Option for Service Includes Commercial Use so that it's on
- Set the Seller Details to include countries where english is a common first language or countries which do not have a lot of sellers. If a country is generally not fluent english speaking and had a lot of sellers, I generally exclude it. Non-english countries with few sellers are included. Sure, I miss some potentially good sellers. But I quickly filter out a lot of bad sellers. It saves a bunch of time.
- Set a maximum budget
- For art, I open any gig in a new tab where their default image looks 'good enough'. If it's not art, I'm going to open any gig which is priced well enough.
- When I get into the gig, the first thing I check is their tiers to see that Commercial Use is actually available at the lowest tier.
- The next thing I check is to see if some delivered works are available in among the gig images.
- Gauge the gig based on delivered works,  and english fluency or domain knowledge displayed in the description.

Pass all that and I'll add the gig to a List, then contact people off the List whenever I need stuff.

Commercial Use is a hard filter. If it's not offered by default in the gig, I skip the seller as too complicated. I see a lot of people put their personal Commercial Use rules in an FAQ at the bottom to try and claim bits and pieces of the copyrights. According to what I've been told by Fiverr CS, only what's in the Gig/Offer is considered contract/agreement, and the Commercial Use rights are all rights. I skip anyone who complicates that side of the process, and have dropped sellers who changed their Commercial Use conditions.

Special note: I have never checked if a seller is online or not. I have never used the Online Sellers Only toggle. A seller has a day to get back to me before I start worrying, and likely a week to get back to me before I offer the task to someone else.

This is quite informative. It's nice to read a buyer's point of view

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