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The Seven Types of Logos and When to Use Them


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The Seven Types of Logos and When to Use Them

 
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Hi Logo Makers! 😁

Here's an overview about the seven different types of logos, and when to use them: 

You’ve done it. You created a winning business idea, scribbled out exhaustive blueprints, and are beginning to build the house so you can finally open doors and invite in patrons. And every savvy business owner knows that a sleek logo is one of the largest and most delicate parts of the house, which is exactly why you’re here.

A businesses’ logo is like meeting someone for the first time. You feel their handshake, get a good look at their appearance, and maybe notice a few quick characteristics about them. You want your logo to be a skillful portrayal or your brand that does it justice, and since it’ll be plastered everywhere your business travels, it’s one of the dominant elements of your brand.

Knowing just how crucial a logo is, let’s take a look at the seven different style logos so you can choose the best one to represent your business.

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Made by leariga

Pictorial Marks (logo symbols)

In its basic essence, every logo is a symbol. But pictorial marks use simple imagery to emblemize a brand in a sleek, effective way. When done the right way, they can illustrate the brand’s purpose while providing an opportunity to become a highly-recognizable figure.

Think big brands like Twitter’s tweeting bird, Snapchat’s open-armed ghost, or perhaps one of the most significant logos in the world—Apple’s apple.

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Lettermarks or Monogram Logos

Lettermarks are staples of the logo industry and turn complicated business names into a digestible 2-4 letter acronym. Brands like HBO, IBM, NASA, and more wisely opted for this type of logo for a simplistic but compelling way to showcase their identity. After all, many people have referenced the name IBM, but how often do mouths utter the name International Business Machines?

If you have a long, complicated business name, consider a lettermark. Even in this simplistic approach, font and design opportunities are endless.

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Made by obuss88

Abstract Logo Marks

Abstract logos are a visionary step up from pictorial marks. While they still use imagery to convey attributes of your brand, they're a conceptual design that’s forged from the mind and isn’t based on an everyday object. Think Nike’s swoosh—some may see a check to put in a box, but others that look deeper may see speed and movement.

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Made by borydesign

Emblem

Emblems are the oldest and most traditional types of logos that have stood the test of time—because they work. Starbucks, BMW, and a slew of sports teams choose to show off these logos, which can be thought of as a brand’s family crest. Emblem logos offer a lot in the realm of creative scope, and you can usually squeeze in a lot of detail if you decide on an emblem logo.

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Made by Juancharles

Mascots

Mascot logos seal the deal for many sporting and fast food companies, but can also be used across the industry spectrum. Wendy’s and KFC are two popular fast-food mascot logos, but MGM’s lion certainly shakes (and roars) up the mascot logo arena. When you pick a mascot logo, the mascot can double as your brand ambassador, as seen in SunBum sunscreen’s friendly monkey.

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Made by name_art

Combination

If you want to combine graphics and text, a combination affords you a world of possibilities. These are some of the most versatile logos and are a smart choice for new companies, as you can separate elements when your brand becomes more recognizable. With a combination logo, your identifier can bounce between only text, only graphics, and both together.

Wordmarks (logotypes)

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Made by Zlannan

Like a lettermark, a wordmark pulls the name of the brand into the logo. But instead of condensing it, wordmarks spell out all or most of the brand name. An obvious example here is Google or Facebook. If you’re in possession of a catchy business name that isn’t excessive and may be pleasing to say, a wordmark can do wonders as your logo.

Thanks for reading! Feel free to share your thoughts here in the comment section.

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