Jump to content

International Slang


gina_riley2
 Share

Recommended Posts

I was texting someone from S. America and living in the USA, there is a certain type of language we use among familiar people.

I've gotten to know her quite well and was going to start the convo with, "Hey girl, what up? 😁"

It doesn't matter how old or young someone is, just an informal language among friends. Then I realized that her culture may deemed that strange. This being an international platform, we mostly advise newbies to address each other by the username vice sir, dude, etc.

Have you found the differences in buyer's tones after working with them for a long time to be more familiar?

Which country do you find to be the most formal and informal?

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, gina_riley2 said:

Have you found the differences in buyer's tones after working with them for a long time to be more familiar?

Up to a certain point, yes.
We start out with a very formal professional ( but friendly enough) tone and  after several orders, we started loosening up a bit.
This one buyer was calling me with my username but after a huge order he thanked me saying "Thanks bro!!"

I didn't mind it at all, but I did let him know I ain't a dude. He was very sweet and apologetic🤣

  • Like 6
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't believe online is any different to the real world - I've always addressed people by their surname (or username on 5r), or even Dr, Sir or Mrs in the real world, when doing business with them - at least to start with & until advised otherwise. As @vickiespencerhas said - the tone can change, but always best to play safe until you know where the land lies.       

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, zeus777 said:

saying "Thanks bro!!"

Thanks for the valuable info dudette!!

😆😁 [I couldn't resist ]

56 minutes ago, vickiespencer said:

. I follow the buyer's lead.

Thank you very much for this valuable information, Mrs Spencer. 😆

Seriously, though, many languages have familiar and formal words, pending the status of the person such as teacher, grandparents, friends, etc. 

In Spanish, they have "esta" vs "estas" and in Korean there is a "yo" added to the end of a verb to signify respect. [Un yon ha say yo (hello formally)].

Is it similar to that in Japanese @zeus777

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, gina_riley2 said:

Is it similar to that in Japanese

Gosh, Japanese has this thing called "keigo," which is the polite language but the keigo is separated into 3 different categories and since I'm speaking

English 80% of the time at work and only speak casually in Japanese with my family and friends I get nervous when talking in keigo because I'm worried

I might make a mistake and sound silly or rude. Or dumb.
 

We add the word "desu" "masu" at the end to sound more polite, but that can escalate to "gozaimasu" and other fancy words that fries my brain. 
I REALLY respect my foreign friends learning Japanese, I dunno how they do it. 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...