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Finding a REAL EXPERT among new sellers


gina_riley2

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I have been fortunate enough to have been a buyer on 5r since before the "transaction/admin fees" were instituted. Yes, that is correct, there was a time when 5r did not charge buyers a fee to buy here. 

During those times, it was quite a deal of trial and error to find sellers that offered great products at a very reasonable or even low low price. Even though this platform has changed quite a bit since the early days, there are still plenty of great seller's among the newbies. Although, I can not guarantee you will land one of the professionals, you can minimalize your chances of being swindled. 

It's going to take some time on your side, but here are my tips in finding that "Diamond in a black cole" among new sellers:

1. 5r rotates new sellers constantly so feel free to skip to page 5 or 10, by limiting yourself to page 1 or 2, you could be missing out on a great newbie that just signed up

2. Take a look at the profile picture. Stock images are okay but not if they are selling logos or illustrations, they should be displaying their original work. Right click and do a google search to see if it's stolen.  If yes, move on.

3. Once you click the gig image, take a look at their description. Is it well written, is it full of grammatical errors? Is it short, is it long, is it hard to read? 

  • Regardless of what is being sold, the seller should have a nicely written, bullet points on what he/she will provide for you
  • They should have a Q&A section, for any questions they feel the clients (us) may have - not always needed, if they captured it all in the description
  • There should be no spelling or punctuation errors, the sentences should be coherent and make sense
  • My definition of an expert is someone who has spent at least 1000 hours on a subject outside of school or training. So many newbies tout they are an "EXPERT" without any means to verify their abilities. After buying for a while, you will get what I mean here
  • Stay away from all sellers that state (or similar to): 
    • I will give you best work 
    • I will give you unlimited revision until you are satisfied 
    • I guarantee you will be happy
  • Note: All those notes above are redundant. Time is money. Ask yourself these questions: 
    • Would an expert in his/her field really need to state the obvious?
    • Doesn't an expert photographer (as an example) always do their best work?
    • As an expert, why would you give unlimited revision? You are an expert, your work should reflect it. 
    • No expert or not, can guarantee happiness. This is subject to interpretation.
  • You, as the buyer, will find great sellers and professional, on this platform, do not offer unlimited revisions or guarantee satisfaction, because they know better. It may sound good on the surface, but there is a reason why they may be offering such a good deal.
  • Take the time to actually READ the description box to see what the seller's requirements are for that gig. They may not do what you are seeking. Inbox them if you aren't sure.
  • Give the sellers 24 hours to respond inbox quarries. They aren't robots and they could snoozing soundly with pleasant dreams on the other side of the word. 
    • Read their response carefully for grammar and sentence structures; especially if you are buying an article or any writing material. They should be responding with clear concise answers, well written and professional.
    • I found some respond with short answers because they do not have the ability to write and will give me a plagiarized article - yes, it has happened to me.
    • Don't use emoji's to communicate on your initial contact. After working for a while and you have a friendly relationship, then it is acceptable. First contact should be strictly professional.

4. Separate your forum relationship with 5r platform relationship. Forum is for fun and the site is for business, just because you know someone from here doesn't mean you are entitled to a freebie, special discount or anything else. I have bought gigs from a few sellers I've met on this forum and have always followed their gig requirement. 

5. If the seller has a great gig, nice profile, well written description and you have communicated well - then take that leap of faith; however, I strongly advise you to buy a lower price gig for say $10 to $20 as a test run. Don't ever rush into a large project until you have worked with a newbie at least once!

6. Never buy from someone complaining about not getting any orders from this forum. [This one will be controversial and I'll probably get flack for it but, I don't care. This is my opinion - feel free to follow or not.] There may be a reason why they aren't making sales.

I've gotten some really great work from newbies at rock bottom prices. Many of them are now senior sellers and have raised their prices to 10x or even 50x higher than when I worked with them. So don't dismiss a newbie too quickly!! 

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On 10/1/2021 at 2:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

I've gotten some really great work from newbies at rock bottom prices. Many of them are now senior sellers and have raised their prices to 10x or even 50x higher than when I worked with them. So don't dismiss a newbie too quickly!! 

Lol, I was one of those newbies. 🙂 Thank you very much.   And it is true, I now sell for $50 what I once sold for $5.

On 10/1/2021 at 2:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

So many newbies tout they are an "EXPERT" without any means to verify their abilities.

Expert and professional are two overused words in gig descriptions in my opinion.

On 10/1/2021 at 2:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

Stay away from all sellers that state (or similar to): 

  • I will give you best work 
  • I will give you unlimited revision until you are satisfied 
  • I guarantee you will be happy

I agree for the very reasons you explained. I have tried and tried to explain to newbies that unlimited revisions is not the way to go, but too many I have given tha advice to and then check on later, still have "Unlimited Revisions" and "100% Satisfaction Guaranteed" on their gig descriptions.

On 10/1/2021 at 2:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

Don't use emoji's to communicate on your initial contact.

😱 Guilty! (I blame Nika!)

On 10/1/2021 at 2:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

Never buy from someone complaining about not getting any orders from this forum.

On 10/1/2021 at 2:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

There may be a reason why they aren't making sales.

I have thought this many times when I am in my 'buyer' role. The Forum buyers that I have made purchases from have been upbeat. In fact they talk a lot about their favorite coffee and most recent treat purchase from Starbucks. Hint: Look at my gig image and then look at Gina's. ☺️

Finally, @gina_riley2 it has been good to see you around the FF lately. Your presence makes me miss the good old FF days. I never thought I would say that, but this new FF is well ... I will be nice. 

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17 hours ago, gina_riley2 said:

Read their response carefully for grammar and sentence structures; especially if you are buying an article or any writing material. They should be responding with clear concise answers, well written and professional.

This is really a good point you mentioned. As a new seller here in the content writing srction, I try best to communicate with my buyers as professionally as possible (with no ambiguous statement, grammatical error free sentence, etc.). This kind of attitude surely reflects the gravity of my service I believe.

Anyways, great post indeed. Rellay appreciate your effort. 

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On 10/1/2021 at 11:40 AM, gina_riley2 said:

I found some respond with short answers because they do not have the ability to write and will give me a plagiarized article - yes, it has happened to me.

This is an excellent point. My recommendation would be to have a conversation with the seller first. In turn, you can:

1. Ensure that they understand your requirements.

2. Assess their English proficiency. If they can't have a clear and coherent conversation within the message center, they may not be the best choice to write your content. 

I hope this helps! 😄

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1 hour ago, creat1vepattern said:

Assess their English proficiency. If they can't have a clear and coherent conversation within the message center, they may not be the best choice to write your content. 

Yes, many have their profile and gig descriptions written by a native speaker.  Engage them in a series of back and forth conversations via inbox to see if they sound anything like their advert.   

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On 10/1/2021 at 7:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

There should be no spelling or punctuation errors

It might depend on what you're buying. If you're buying artwork or a voice over it shouldn't really matter if there are a few minor spelling mistakes - eg. if it won't really affect the delivery. If they're offering writing then it's more important.

Quote

Never buy from someone complaining about not getting any orders from this forum.

Though it could just be Fiverr rotating the gigs and where the seller isn't really at fault. People have complained about not getting enough orders from new buyers when they are still getting regular orders from previous buyers, or where they still have a lot of orders in the queue but complain about rank. I don't think it necessarily means they're not a good seller to buy from.

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Is there a way to get this pinned? Three and five captures some pain points that are brought up a lot in discussions. Five tops the list as some buyers request sample work using the information from their soon-to-be order, but as soon as a seller suggests paying for said sample the buyer disappears.

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Hi Gina, thanks for your valuable tips. There is one that sticks out with me. "My definition of an expert is someone who has spent at least 1000 hours on a subject outside of school or training." You are being way too generous. Did you mean, at least 10,000 hours? Only 1000 hours breaks down to about 1/2 year of on the job experience in a 40 hour work week. And by "school or training' did you mean a college degree? Here's my deinition of an expert.

At least one 4 year college degree and 5 years on the job experience. Or a 2 year college degree and 10 years on the job experience. Or 25 years on the job experience without a college degree. This definition is a standard in most engineering professions. Even these criteria are fairly forgiving. 

You said, "So many newbies tout they are an "EXPERT" without any means to verify their abilities." On this I'll accept your expert opinion even though I cannot verify you are an expert. Since I wish you to be an expert, then to me, you are. 

It has been recommended that a profile contain one's education, accomplishments and any certifications. This is what defines someone as a real expert, However, you are right, claiming to be an 'expert' is bad form, IMO. It is an indication that one is NOT an expert and is probably expressing wishful thinking. In my experience real 'experts' are awarded that distinction by other people and don't make the claim themselves. Real 'experts' won't say "I'm an expert" unless asked the question, "are you an expert?" It they are then you can't shut them up. Which is a good indication someone actually is an expert.

Wishful thinkers will say "I'm an expert" knowing that most people won't actually check to verify. So, why not state you are an expert even if you are not really. I'm sure there are way more people wishing someone to be an expert, than those that will actually verify the claim. So, why not make the claim? Odds are you will be believed without being verified.

Tim

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All peoples are start their journey from newbie .Not only here but also every where .So a new seller is now at this point after a few days that person will give you same service with very high cost price.So a new sellers are all not dull but have lack of experience. Give chance a new seller, he will give you his best.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Whether you're a solopreneur, startup founder, or small business owner, hiring freelancers on a project-by-project basis is one of the best ways to avoid paying for a full-time employee while still getting the support you need to grow your business. 

As you search through Fiverr, you may wonder how to find the right freelancer for your business. That's exactly why I've written this post. My goal is to provide a set of specific criteria that you can use throughout your search. 

Enjoy! 

1. Browse the Categories 

Even if you're accustomed to using a search bar, Fiverr has a robust panel of categories that, in my opinion, is even better than the top search bar. Unless you're searching for an ultra-specific niche, I would recommend starting with your desired category. 

image.thumb.png.feeaaf5c43aca2cf74167d69d3f86579.png

2. Set Your Criteria 

This might be one of the most overlooked steps, but could save a significant amount of time. After clicking on your desired category, I recommend taking a look at the filters. Here, you can filter sellers based on several factors. For example, if you're in the website content category, you will find writers who write in English, Spanish, French, and a host of other languages. There are well over 1,000 gigs in this category alone, and so filtering based on the specific language you need will help you avoid scrolling through countless pages of irrelevant gigs.

 image.thumb.png.f5782d6982e3827ecf17cde9fc9deb19.png

3. Determine Your Needs First

No two businesses are exactly alike. As you scroll through potential sellers, you will find a myriad of basic, standard, and premium packages. Instead of waiting until you come across a package that seems to have everything you're looking for, my recommendation is to determine what you need first. That's because sellers can offer custom gigs. In turn, you can focus on finding the perfect seller as opposed to the perfect gig

*One note: ensure that the gig you're inquiring about is close to what you're looking for before asking for a custom gig. For example, asking a copywriter for a larger word count than what's offered would be acceptable. Asking them for web development services, however, would likely be out of scope. 

4. Start a Conversation (If Necessary)

Over time, many sellers adapt their offerings to align with the most common requests they receive. As a result, you may find the exact service you're looking for. While some sellers prefer that you contact them first, others prefer that you order without contacting them. In some cases, the seller may even specify which approach they prefer in the gig description. My advice is to order without contacting the buyer only if the gig description clarified any and all lingering questions you may have had. If not, ask away!

5. Provide an Example

Although this step isn't always necessary (or possible), sharing a link, image, or sample from a competitor is one of the best ways to communicate your goals and expectations to a freelancer. For example, you may find that your competitor's landing page has the exact tone you'd like your website to have. By sharing a link to a potential copywriter, you may be able to better articulate your website copy goals. 

6. Ask Qualifying Questions 

What are your expectations for the perfect freelancer? By having a list of qualifying questions to ask prospective freelancers, you can narrow down your search. Here are a few examples:

  • Will I solely be working with the person messaging me right now, or are you part of an agency with other people doing the work?
  • I need the project completed in 7 days or less, can you meet this timeline? 
  • Have you worked with other clients in my industry before? 

Before asking questions, I always recommend reading the frequently asked questions (FAQs) portion of a seller's gig. 

7. Start Small

If you have an ongoing or large-scale project, starting with a seller's basic package may be a good way to determine if they're the right fit for your business. Be sure to look into subscription packages and ask about bulk discounts if you are considering a long-term arrangement. 

8. Scale Up

Once you've found the perfect freelancer, you can scale up the amount of work you give them while saving time. That's because after establishing a mutual understanding of your goals, branding requirements, and background, you can reduce the time spent explaining, thereby expediting the process. 

9. Ask for Referrals 

Oftentimes, freelancers are asked if they can recommend sellers who provide services that they do not offer. For example, a copywriter may be asked if they know another freelancer who specializes in web development. After finding a freelancer who you can trust, asking for a referral may save time for the next service you need. 

I hope this was helpful! Thank you for reading. 

 

Warm wishes, 

Creat1vepattern

 

 

 

Edited by creat1vepattern
Grammar
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On 10/1/2021 at 7:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

've gotten some really great work from newbies at rock bottom prices. Many of them are now senior sellers and have raised their prices to 10x or even 50x higher than when I worked with them. So don't dismiss a newbie too quickly!! 

 

Hello Gina,

Of course, you made my early start on Fiverr quite smooth. You were always looking for new sellers to empower, and I am one of those newbies. At the time when it was a bit difficult to hire new sellers, you gave some of us reasons to stay in business. Though I lost the account that I was using that time to depession following the demise of my beloved father in 2019, I must confess that you helped me gain experiences here on Fiverr. You were the first to give me a job to write a book blurb which was supposed to be for 5$, but I also got a tip of an extra 5$. May be it's time to return the gratitude. Thank you so much, and do have a great year.

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Great post. 

Although I'm now close to level two seller but I still consider myself to be a new seller on Fiverr! 

I absolutely offer no revision at any of my gigs; this may sound a bit arrogant but this is what I do. 

 

Also, I dunno if my gigs and/or profile are beautifully crafted; however,  my works are being appreciated by my clients and quite a few of them are now my regular ones. 

 

(I'm a writer).

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On 10/2/2021 at 8:37 PM, iftequarossi said:

I am a new seller. And got 5 star from a client. Buy from someone who is ready to satisfy you with revisions.

A couple of revisions is normal in certain circumstances, especially when it comes to design, but unlimited revisions? Your technical and communication skill are questionable if you need endless revision to get the work done right. Also, such claim puts you in vulnerable position because some buyers might take advantage of you and you can't say no. Being clear about your scope of service is important to avoid exploitation.

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These are great points. Thank you for advocating for people who show up on the 5th page of the search, but can provide quality work. I know that it is scary to invest your money with a new seller, so I always recommend checking out their website and talking to them just to get the feeling of their knowledge and work ethic. This should usually weed out the "fake experts". 

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On 10/1/2021 at 7:40 PM, gina_riley2 said:

I have been fortunate enough to have been a buyer on 5r since before the "transaction/admin fees" were instituted. Yes, that is correct, there was a time when 5r did not charge buyers a fee to buy here. 

This... so accurate. Do you also remember when an order 'that gets canceled for late delivery' used to be automatic 1star Review?

Thanks for this well detailed post. I know I'm guilty of some of these points but will definitely do better! 

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  • 6 months later...

Some of new seller are very professional, but they have not much review and work to prove in this Fiverr platform, but they worked in a local marketplace, So before you hire them you can want a work prove from them, then you can hire them for the lowest price and give them a chance to prove their expertise. Maximum new seller have much expertise on his field, but they have not much order in Fiverr, that's why buyers don't see their profile on the first page. So if you want to know the spot potentiality of a new seller, you should buy a service from them with the lowest price so that you can understand the potentiality of a new seller. I'm also a new seller in this field.

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Seriously some people really need to understand that been a new seller doesn't mean the seller is new to handle project on fiverr, some account may got blocked and the seller will decided to open a new one. Like me for case study am a new seller but not a solo freelancer but as a group. I always go to office Mon-Fri. With a lot of professional to consult, so definitely any projects I handle will definitely be delivered to the best of my client. You can message me and have a video call if you to believe me... Regards

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I'm a seller here, but when I'm a buyer - I check if there is consistency in what he/she does. 

If we're talking about arts - check if the shown examples are at the same level with already sold art. 
So many times I've seen ppl promote with artwork on amazing level and then when commissioned creating just mediocre level art. 

Also... Someone can be new here, but already known on some different platform. 

Another thing is communication. I tend to trust more those who not always write "Yes" to everything I say. I had one guy always write me "my dear customer" and in the end he was using some general art creator (I'm not sure how to call it, it was not hand drawn - it was generated thru some program). 

So.... Know what you want, do your research, don't be blinded by nice words. 

Although... Fiverr is a platform that protects both buyer and seller so at least you don't have to be worried about scammers 🙂 

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  • 1 month later...

It not only good tips for buyer it's also good tips for seller. As a new seller we should focus on our skills. It doesn't matter what skill you gained, when you achieved professionalism, you will got success and I believe in that. Some buyer have to know that , fiverr's new seller that not means he/she never worked on the skill. It can be he/she worked before some agency or some local buyer but he/she new in fiverr.   

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