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Hi;

So I explained in detail what I was gonna do to a client and they completely agreed and asked me to start working.

After the Delivery they started asking me for  totally different tasks. I'm just afraid if they leave me a bad review if i refuse. 

I'm relatively new and a bad review would ruin me as a seller.

Any suggestions? 

EDIT: They asked for cancellation, would that affect my gig? and what if he just takes my work for free?

 

Edited by crafty_article
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4 minutes ago, crafty_article said:

Hi;

So I explained in detail what I was gonna do to a client and they completely agreed and asked me to start working.

After the Delivery they started asking me for  totally different tasks. I'm just afraid if they leave me a bad review if i refuse. 

I'm relatively new and a bad review would ruin me as a seller.

Any suggestions? 

EDIT: They asked for cancellation, would that affect my gig? and what if he just takes my work for free?

 

All you can do is explain to them that the totally different tasks (since they were not part of the original discussion) would be a gig extra, for which you would be happy to send an offer. Just do what you originally promised and deliver that. If they ask for a cancellation, refuse as long as you have done what was asked for in the original order. TOS backs this up, and I can show you where if you need it. But most importantly, don't be so afraid. A negative review, while not fun, will not ruin you. Cancellations also ding your metrics, and even though the cancellation goes away after 60 days. You get to explain your side of the story to a bad review. 

The very worst thing you can do is start out being afraid of buyers and their actions. Don't start the precedent of cancelling and letting them steal your work. You have to be polite, insistent and explain that they are asking for things which, while not originally ordered, you will be happy to add to their order. 

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2 minutes ago, crafty_article said:

Hi;

So I explained in detail what I was gonna do to a client and they completely agreed and asked me to start working.

After the Delivery they started asking me for  totally different tasks. I'm just afraid if they leave me a bad review if i refuse. 

I'm relatively new and a bad review would ruin me as a seller.

Any suggestions? 

 

Sorry to hear about your experience. 

My recommendation is to stand your ground. If you clearly agreed on what you should do for the buyer, you have that in writing. Make sure you point this out in a friendly and professional manner. Don't refuse to do different tasks, but make it clear that additional work will require an order extra. Don't let the buyer push you around just because you're new! 

I wrote a guide on bad buyers here: 

And another one for dealing with negative reviews, here: 

 

At this point, I highly recommend you do the following: 

  • Explain in a professional, curteous way, that you will not work for free, and that the agreed upon work has been completed. Make sure to let the buyer know that you are more than happy to help them out with additional tasks, but that it wasn't in the scope of this order. 
  • If the buyer abuses the Request Revision button, you can point to the terms on Fiverr, stating: 
  • Buyers may use the "Request Revisions" feature located on the Order Page while an Order is marked as Delivered if the delivered materials do not match the Seller's description on their Gig page or they do not match the requirements sent to the Seller at the beginning of the order process.

So, if you delivered what was described in the custom offer/gig description, they may not use that feature. 

Stand your ground - in a professional manner. If you get a negative review, you get a negative review. I'm a top rated seller, and even I have a 1-star review, because I refused to work for free. The buyer didn't like having to pay, so he left me a one-star review. I haven't regretted it for a second, because it taught me a simple lesson: don't work for free.

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3 minutes ago, smashradio said:

Don't refuse to do different tasks, but make it clear that additional work will require an order extra.

It is all in how you handle the conversation, yes. When someone asks me, "Hey, Mike, can you read the entire script again, this time with a Leprechaun voice?" My answer is always "Sure, I'll send the offer over shortly."  It immediately starts from the point that you are ordering another Gin n Tonic from the bar, so of course, that costs. Not even a question. I used to hate the revision requests, then I realized that it is the chance to make another sale.  

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1 minute ago, newsmike said:

It is all in how you handle the conversation, yes. When someone asks me, "Hey, Mike, can you read the entire script again, this time with a Leprechaun voice?" My answer is always "Sure, I'll send the offer over shortly."  It immediately starts from the point that you are ordering another Gin n Tonic from the bar, so of course, that costs. Not even a question. I used to hate the revision requests, then I realized that it is the chance to make another sale.  

Yeah. I hate revision requests because I offer two of them included (if I make a mistake, of course) but I'm pretty lax with my buyers on that. Maybe they just want a bit more pause between two sentences. Sure, I'll give them that! Or a short line that has to be added or changed. But if they order more than a couple extra ice cubes in my bar, they are going to have to pay for it. I do that the same way you do; by making it clear from the get-go that I consider the change as a paid extra, and not a freebie. 

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9 minutes ago, newsmike said:

All you can do is explain to them that the totally different tasks (since they were not part of the original discussion) would be a gig extra, for which you would be happy to send an offer. Just do what you originally promised and deliver that. If they ask for a cancellation, refuse as long as you have done what was asked for in the original order. TOS backs this up, and I can show you where if you need it. But most importantly, don't be so afraid. A negative review, while not fun, will not ruin you. Cancellations also ding your metrics, and even though the cancellation goes away after 60 days. You get to explain your side of the story to a bad review. 

The very worst thing you can do is start out being afraid of buyers and their actions. Don't start the precedent of cancelling and letting them steal your work. You have to be polite, insistent and explain that they are asking for things which, while not originally ordered, you will be happy to add to their order. 

 

8 minutes ago, smashradio said:

Sorry to hear about your experience. 

My recommendation is to stand your ground. If you clearly agreed on what you should do for the buyer, you have that in writing. Make sure you point this out in a friendly and professional manner. Don't refuse to do different tasks, but make it clear that additional work will require an order extra. Don't let the buyer push you around just because you're new! 

I wrote a guide on bad buyers here: 

And another one for dealing with negative reviews, here: 

 

At this point, I highly recommend you do the following: 

  • Explain in a professional, curteous way, that you will not work for free, and that the agreed upon work has been completed. Make sure to let the buyer know that you are more than happy to help them out with additional tasks, but that it wasn't in the scope of this order. 
  • If the buyer abuses the Request Revision button, you can point to the terms on Fiverr, stating: 
  • Buyers may use the "Request Revisions" feature located on the Order Page while an Order is marked as Delivered if the delivered materials do not match the Seller's description on their Gig page or they do not match the requirements sent to the Seller at the beginning of the order process.

So, if you delivered what was described in the custom offer/gig description, they may not use that feature. 

Stand your ground - in a professional manner. If you get a negative review, you get a negative review. I'm a top rated seller, and even I have a 1-star review, because I refused to work for free. The buyer didn't like having to pay, so he left me a one-star review. I haven't regretted it for a second, because it taught me a simple lesson: don't work for free.

Understood, thank you so much for your valuable advices! I will try to Stand my ground! 

Which is worst a 1 star review or a cancellation? ( Just in case things didn't go so well )

 

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5 minutes ago, crafty_article said:

Which is worst a 1 star review or a cancellation? ( Just in case things didn't go so well )

I think the cancellation is worse. It is rewarding a bully. Because you work free. If restaurants gave the meal away free every time someone threatened a bad review, they would serve freeloaders all night, every night. I say, let them leave a bad review, then you explain that they wanted you to work free in your response. But at least you have their money. It is about what's right. 

 

P.S. when you see someone with hundreds of 5 star reviews and no others, you know that they have bribed their buyers off with cancels to "sanitize" their ratings, so it is BS anyway. Not even the iPhone, BMW or Mercedes have 100% perfect reviews. So I look sideways at sellers here who do. 

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6 minutes ago, crafty_article said:

 

Understood, thank you so much for your valuable advices! I will try to Stand my ground! 

Which is worst a 1 star review or a cancellation? ( Just in case things didn't go so well )

 

Difficult to say. If you have a few good reviews under your belt and you have a few regular buyers lined up, I'd say take the review, answer it, and make sure you're also honest in your review of the buyer. It can bring your rating down, but if you keep getting good reviews after, it will pick itself back up. 

I always read the negative reviews when I pick buyers, because the way they handle them says a lot about their character, and I want to work with sellers who have the self-respect to know their worth (those are usually the more professional ones). 

Purely stats-wise, I'd say a cancellation is less harmful in the long run, because it will go away after 60 days if you keep delivering all your orders from this point forward. But then again, you'd have lost a bit of self-respect, and you'd be giving away your work for free to a buyer who thinks "hah, another one" before they move on to the next, new buyer to abuse. 

I just don't like that practice. If I have to take a bad review because of it, I will. 

I sometimes prefer to cancel a job rather than forcing the buyer to pay, but then it will be because I couldn't make the buyer happy within the confines of the order. It can be good customer service to let a buyer "return the product", but it depends entirely on the situation: is the buyer in the right? Then, maybe. If not; I expect to get paid for my work. 

Edited by smashradio
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1 minute ago, newsmike said:

I think the cancellation is worse. It is rewarding a bully. Because you work free. If restaurants gave the meal away free every time someone threatened a bad review, they would serve freeloaders all night, every night. I say, let them leave a bad review, then you explain that they wanted you to work free in your response. But at least you have their money. It is about what's right. 

I'd like to add to this that it's against the terms to threaten with a negative review. If the buyer does that to try and force you into working for free, customer support should handle it. 

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1 minute ago, smashradio said:

I'd like to add to this that it's against the terms to threaten with a negative review. If the buyer does that to try and force you into working for free, customer support should handle it. 

Agree, and be sure to remind CS that you do not need to cancel, (Per TOS) because you delivered what was described in the offer. Sometimes CS needs to be reminded of their own TOS. 

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By the way: if you get a 1 star review now, your average will be 4.4. That could make it very difficult to get new orders if you're competing against sellers with 5-star reviews AND you're new. Just wanted to mention it so you know what you're up against. 

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4 minutes ago, smashradio said:

By the way: if you get a 1 star review now, your average will be 4.4. That could make it very difficult to get new orders if you're competing against sellers with 5-star reviews AND you're new. Just wanted to mention it so you know what you're up against. 

Hopefully, he can politely make them see that it is just more work they are asking for, and get the gig extra anyway. Otherwise, he can then choose to either take your diplomatic approach, or my "ready the F-15's and then salt the fields after the bombing," approach.   

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4 minutes ago, newsmike said:

Hopefully, he can politely make them see that it is just more work they are asking for, and get the gig extra anyway. Otherwise, he can then choose to either take your diplomatic approach, or my "ready the F-15's and then salt the fields after the bombing," approach.   

Yeah, both are bad alternatives. At the moment, I must say your F-15 approach would be best if it can't be solved by talking to the buyer. Most situations like this can be solved with a bit of dialogue. 

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