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How to negotiate and get better deals on Fiverr (without seeming rude!)


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20 hours ago, smashradio said:

The way you do it – and when – is what makes all the difference. 

Thanks for the thoughtful post. Although I wanted to add from my point of view, whenever I have negotiated a lower rate, I have generally lived to regret it. I find that dealing with buyers who have no worries about the cost are going to be easier to work with, open to paying for revisions and extras and more focused on the project quality. 

If they are starting a project with concerns about the costs, I readily advise "There are lots of good sellers here who are more affordable."  They usually say, ok, thanks, and about 25% of the time, accept that they have to pay full freight, and do so.

At the end of the day, I usually respond to people who a bit more adament with the question, "Why would you ask me to do your job for less than my usual wage."  So far no one has ever been able to give a solid answer.

I may have passed on a few $, but I am sure I have avoided some real hell also. 

 

 

 

Edited by newsmike
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Sort of an elaboration on #7; I've been offered discounts before from sellers I use a lot, specifically to entice me to place bulk orders. However, I'm generally accepting on the first delivery with no revision requests and my task descriptions have been evolving into a pretty decent state where little is unclear or ambiguous, so they're easy to action. As a buyer, if you consistently take less time and effort to please, you may see it reflected in the offers.

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@newsmikeThanks for your feedback. I agree, for the most part. 

It depends entirely on the project. Buyers who are not concerned with lowering the rate for a project are easier to work with, usually. 

 

But there are situations when negotiating makes sense. In one case, I politely asked if it was possible to match my budget if I was willing to accept the delivery with a slightly extended deadline. I had 500 dollar budget, and the usual rate of the provider was 550. 

It ended up becoming a respectful and enjoyable negotiation that resulted in a long and good professional relationship, and I got the project done within my budget. 

 

Sometimes, you have to be concerned about the price because you're working within constraints that cannot change. It also makes sense that companies want to get the best possible price and the best possible quality: what I'd call "a good deal". 

 

For me, as a seller, it makes sense to offer "a good deal" to attract business, but this doesn't mean I'll work for pennies. I'd rather say no thank you to a job than do that. It's not about being cheap: it's about working together and being able to negotiate. Sometimes, it might not be just the price: perhaps the buyer is 25 words over the limit but asks nicely if it's possible to take the extra 10 dollars off because it would cause him to go over budget? On a 500 dollar gig, that would make sense. On a 20 dollar gig, it would not. 

In the end, it's up to the seller. I've said no thanks to plenty of projects because their budget wasn't aligned with my rates. Sometimes, if a buyer becomes too pushy about the price, I'll say thanks, but no thanks, because at this point, their attitude is a red flag. 

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On 7/29/2021 at 4:33 AM, smashradio said:

 

Hey, buyers! 

I'm a fellow buyer and a top-rated seller here on Fiverr. I want to tell you something about negotiating with your seller to avoid coming across as rude. First of all, let me tell you that there's nothing wrong with negotiating prices on bigger projects. It's normal and acceptable. The way you do it – and when – is what makes all the difference. 

Also, keep in mind that rules and etiquette can vary across cultures. For example, haggling over price is more common in certain Asian and Middle-Eastern countries. Don't get me wrong: westerners still haggle, but we do it differently and less up-front. 

Here's some stuff that might make you look rude when negotiating with your sellers (and knowing it might help you get some excellent deals!). 

#1 - Don't be Scrooge McDuck (Everybody likes him unless they have to do business with him)

Unless you're bringing a big project, remember that you might come across as cheap and rude if you're asking for a lower price. Asking the seller to do a 20 dollar project for 5 isn't good etiquette, and unless the seller is desperate, you won't end up with a good working relationship. Have respect for other people's time and work, and they will respect you. There's a big difference between asking for five bucks off a 50 dollar order because of budget constraints and asking for 15 dollars off a 20 dollar project. 

#2 - Know the market you're working with

If you're shopping for low-cost services on Fiverr, you're in luck. There's thousands of gigs and some great deals to be had. But before you do, make sure you know the market. Shopping for a Scandinavian high-end and human translation? It's probably going to cost you a bit more because that market is more niche and has higher living costs for the people selling their services. 

Asking a Norwegian translator to translate 1000 words of marketing content for ten bucks manually is an insult: you'll barely get a cup of coffee in Norway for that, while it might be food for the whole family that day in a low-cost country. If you know your market, you'll have more success finding the right seller at the right price. 

#3 - Don't haggle if the seller says the rate is fixed

If you contact a buyer with a project description while asking for a reduced rate, and the buyer explains that their rate is fixed, that means it's fixed. If it's not within your budget range, you should acknowledge that, thank the seller for their time, and move on. 

#4 - Don't insult the seller or service offered

I've experienced this. Buyers who think they can get a better deal by explaining that translation is easy or that just speaking into a microphone isn't worth that much. Insulting a professional like that will not get you a better deal: it might get you blocked, though. 

#5 - "I can get it cheaper elsewhere". 

Ok. Then buy it elsewhere.

#6 - Don't make demands

Ask – don't demand. Some sellers will get angered by demands. This could even be "I'll pay you x for this". 

It might be meant as just a simple statement but can be considered a demand at the other end. Try asking politely instead. Remember, this is for your benefit since a friendly tone can get you a better deal. 

#7 - When you find a seller you like, keep working with them

As a seller, I might be more willing to offer better rates for regular buyers. If I know a buyer has spent 2000 dollars on gigs with me before, and they suddenly have a project that's a bit under budget, I'd be inclined to offer them a lowered rate to help them out. But starting the relationship with a mindset of "I'm gonna pay this seller a maximum 20% of his rates"? No deal. 

Wrapping up

  • Don't be cheap, but don't be afraid of looking for a good deal. If your budget is far off the set rates in the gig, look elsewhere. 
  • Know the market you're shopping in. 
  • Don't push for a lower rate if the buyer tells you the price is fixed. 
  • Don't insult the service or seller. 
  • Ask – don't demand. 
  • Maintain a good relationship with your sellers. In the long run, they might be more willing to help you out. 

(Fun story: This post was inspired by experiencing a single buyer who did all of these things: demanding a ridiculous offer on a small project as a first-time buyer (with me, not on the platform), telling me it's cheaper elsewhere, who kept on haggling after I said my rates are fixed, clearly didn't know the market they were shopping in by asking for at least two hours work for an absurd amount, and then ended up insulting me by explaining how easy my job was when I didn't budge. Let's say I said thanks, but no thanks.)

Thank you

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On 7/29/2021 at 4:03 AM, smashradio said:

 

Hey, buyers! 

I'm a fellow buyer and a top-rated seller here on Fiverr. I want to tell you something about negotiating with your seller to avoid coming across as rude. First of all, let me tell you that there's nothing wrong with negotiating prices on bigger projects. It's normal and acceptable. The way you do it – and when – is what makes all the difference. 

Also, keep in mind that rules and etiquette can vary across cultures. For example, haggling over price is more common in certain Asian and Middle-Eastern countries. Don't get me wrong: westerners still haggle, but we do it differently and less up-front. 

Here's some stuff that might make you look rude when negotiating with your sellers (and knowing it might help you get some excellent deals!). 

#1 - Don't be Scrooge McDuck (Everybody likes him unless they have to do business with him)

Unless you're bringing a big project, remember that you might come across as cheap and rude if you're asking for a lower price. Asking the seller to do a 20 dollar project for 5 isn't good etiquette, and unless the seller is desperate, you won't end up with a good working relationship. Have respect for other people's time and work, and they will respect you. There's a big difference between asking for five bucks off a 50 dollar order because of budget constraints and asking for 15 dollars off a 20 dollar project. 

#2 - Know the market you're working with

If you're shopping for low-cost services on Fiverr, you're in luck. There's thousands of gigs and some great deals to be had. But before you do, make sure you know the market. Shopping for a Scandinavian high-end and human translation? It's probably going to cost you a bit more because that market is more niche and has higher living costs for the people selling their services. 

Asking a Norwegian translator to translate 1000 words of marketing content for ten bucks manually is an insult: you'll barely get a cup of coffee in Norway for that, while it might be food for the whole family that day in a low-cost country. If you know your market, you'll have more success finding the right seller at the right price. 

#3 - Don't haggle if the seller says the rate is fixed

If you contact a buyer with a project description while asking for a reduced rate, and the buyer explains that their rate is fixed, that means it's fixed. If it's not within your budget range, you should acknowledge that, thank the seller for their time, and move on. 

#4 - Don't insult the seller or service offered

I've experienced this. Buyers who think they can get a better deal by explaining that translation is easy or that just speaking into a microphone isn't worth that much. Insulting a professional like that will not get you a better deal: it might get you blocked, though. 

#5 - "I can get it cheaper elsewhere". 

Ok. Then buy it elsewhere.

#6 - Don't make demands

Ask – don't demand. Some sellers will get angered by demands. This could even be "I'll pay you x for this". 

It might be meant as just a simple statement but can be considered a demand at the other end. Try asking politely instead. Remember, this is for your benefit since a friendly tone can get you a better deal. 

#7 - When you find a seller you like, keep working with them

As a seller, I might be more willing to offer better rates for regular buyers. If I know a buyer has spent 2000 dollars on gigs with me before, and they suddenly have a project that's a bit under budget, I'd be inclined to offer them a lowered rate to help them out. But starting the relationship with a mindset of "I'm gonna pay this seller a maximum 20% of his rates"? No deal. 

Wrapping up

  • Don't be cheap, but don't be afraid of looking for a good deal. If your budget is far off the set rates in the gig, look elsewhere. 
  • Know the market you're shopping in. 
  • Don't push for a lower rate if the buyer tells you the price is fixed. 
  • Don't insult the service or seller. 
  • Ask – don't demand. 
  • Maintain a good relationship with your sellers. In the long run, they might be more willing to help you out. 

(Fun story: This post was inspired by experiencing a single buyer who did all of these things: demanding a ridiculous offer on a small project as a first-time buyer (with me, not on the platform), telling me it's cheaper elsewhere, who kept on haggling after I said my rates are fixed, clearly didn't know the market they were shopping in by asking for at least two hours work for an absurd amount, and then ended up insulting me by explaining how easy my job was when I didn't budge. Let's say I said thanks, but no thanks.)

True facts..thank you very much for sharing.

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On 7/30/2021 at 12:55 AM, newsmike said:

Thanks for the thoughtful post. Although I wanted to add from my point of view, whenever I have negotiated a lower rate, I have generally lived to regret it. I find that dealing with buyers who have no worries about the cost are going to be easier to work with, open to paying for revisions and extras and more focused on the project quality. 

If they are starting a project with concerns about the costs, I readily advise "There are lots of good sellers here who are more affordable."  They usually say, ok, thanks, and about 25% of the time, accept that they have to pay full freight, and do so.

At the end of the day, I usually respond to people who a bit more adament with the question, "Why would you ask me to do your job for less than my usual wage."  So far no one has ever been able to give a solid answer.

I may have passed on a few $, but I am sure I have avoided some real hell also. 

 

 

 

Absolutely I also deal with buyer who seems to care about the value and time, and for them price doesn't matter. Being a seller on fiverr there should be a convenience conversation between buyers and us.
 

If buyers are asking more and more questions and want to learn how to solve their problem then they would be the best fit to work with. some buyers come and say I wanna see your portfolio then go vanish without sharing any problems and asking any questions.

 

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On 8/1/2021 at 6:51 PM, smashradio said:

But there are situations when negotiating makes sense. In one case, I politely asked if it was possible to match my budget if I was willing to accept the delivery with a slightly extended deadline. I had 500 dollar budget, and the usual rate of the provider was 550. 

See... THIS is how you do negotiation people! GIVE AND TAKE. You want a cheaper price, you have to make sure it's worth it for the seller too. There are many ways to do this (accepting less revisions, longer delivery times, use a template instead of bespoke design etc). Creative negotiation is the way forward!

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On 7/29/2021 at 4:33 AM, smashradio said:

 

Hey, buyers! 

I'm a fellow buyer and a top-rated seller here on Fiverr. I want to tell you something about negotiating with your seller to avoid coming across as rude. First of all, let me tell you that there's nothing wrong with negotiating prices on bigger projects. It's normal and acceptable. The way you do it – and when – is what makes all the difference. 

Also, keep in mind that rules and etiquette can vary across cultures. For example, haggling over price is more common in certain Asian and Middle-Eastern countries. Don't get me wrong: westerners still haggle, but we do it differently and less up-front. 

Here's some stuff that might make you look rude when negotiating with your sellers (and knowing it might help you get some excellent deals!). 

#1 - Don't be Scrooge McDuck (Everybody likes him unless they have to do business with him)

Unless you're bringing a big project, remember that you might come across as cheap and rude if you're asking for a lower price. Asking the seller to do a 20 dollar project for 5 isn't good etiquette, and unless the seller is desperate, you won't end up with a good working relationship. Have respect for other people's time and work, and they will respect you. There's a big difference between asking for five bucks off a 50 dollar order because of budget constraints and asking for 15 dollars off a 20 dollar project. 

#2 - Know the market you're working with

If you're shopping for low-cost services on Fiverr, you're in luck. There's thousands of gigs and some great deals to be had. But before you do, make sure you know the market. Shopping for a Scandinavian high-end and human translation? It's probably going to cost you a bit more because that market is more niche and has higher living costs for the people selling their services. 

Asking a Norwegian translator to translate 1000 words of marketing content for ten bucks manually is an insult: you'll barely get a cup of coffee in Norway for that, while it might be food for the whole family that day in a low-cost country. If you know your market, you'll have more success finding the right seller at the right price. 

#3 - Don't haggle if the seller says the rate is fixed

If you contact a buyer with a project description while asking for a reduced rate, and the buyer explains that their rate is fixed, that means it's fixed. If it's not within your budget range, you should acknowledge that, thank the seller for their time, and move on. 

#4 - Don't insult the seller or service offered

I've experienced this. Buyers who think they can get a better deal by explaining that translation is easy or that just speaking into a microphone isn't worth that much. Insulting a professional like that will not get you a better deal: it might get you blocked, though. 

#5 - "I can get it cheaper elsewhere". 

Ok. Then buy it elsewhere.

#6 - Don't make demands

Ask – don't demand. Some sellers will get angered by demands. This could even be "I'll pay you x for this". 

It might be meant as just a simple statement but can be considered a demand at the other end. Try asking politely instead. Remember, this is for your benefit since a friendly tone can get you a better deal. 

#7 - When you find a seller you like, keep working with them

As a seller, I might be more willing to offer better rates for regular buyers. If I know a buyer has spent 2000 dollars on gigs with me before, and they suddenly have a project that's a bit under budget, I'd be inclined to offer them a lowered rate to help them out. But starting the relationship with a mindset of "I'm gonna pay this seller a maximum 20% of his rates"? No deal. 

Wrapping up

  • Don't be cheap, but don't be afraid of looking for a good deal. If your budget is far off the set rates in the gig, look elsewhere. 
  • Know the market you're shopping in. 
  • Don't push for a lower rate if the buyer tells you the price is fixed. 
  • Don't insult the service or seller. 
  • Ask – don't demand. 
  • Maintain a good relationship with your sellers. In the long run, they might be more willing to help you out. 

(Fun story: This post was inspired by experiencing a single buyer who did all of these things: demanding a ridiculous offer on a small project as a first-time buyer (with me, not on the platform), telling me it's cheaper elsewhere, who kept on haggling after I said my rates are fixed, clearly didn't know the market they were shopping in by asking for at least two hours work for an absurd amount, and then ended up insulting me by explaining how easy my job was when I didn't budge. Let's say I said thanks, but no thanks.)

very you for a good informative post for the buyer.

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As a seller, I know my worth.  My rates are fixed and when people try to haggle with me, it shows me that they do not value the high quality that I produce with my craft.  I'm not interested in working with people who don't value my awesomeness because it is very rare and hard to find in this world.  I've literally spent almost two decades perfecting my skills and I'm not willing to compromise my rates.  My reviews, samples/examples, and standings speak to my aptitude and customer servie.  If you want something of high quality with superior customer service, don't take worthy sellers for granted.  Just pay them what they're worth 🙂  You won't regret it.

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On 7/29/2021 at 4:33 AM, smashradio said:

 

Hey, buyers! 

I'm a fellow buyer and a top-rated seller here on Fiverr. I want to tell you something about negotiating with your seller to avoid coming across as rude. First of all, let me tell you that there's nothing wrong with negotiating prices on bigger projects. It's normal and acceptable. The way you do it – and when – is what makes all the difference. 

Also, keep in mind that rules and etiquette can vary across cultures. For example, haggling over price is more common in certain Asian and Middle-Eastern countries. Don't get me wrong: westerners still haggle, but we do it differently and less up-front. 

Here's some stuff that might make you look rude when negotiating with your sellers (and knowing it might help you get some excellent deals!). 

#1 - Don't be Scrooge McDuck (Everybody likes him unless they have to do business with him)

Unless you're bringing a big project, remember that you might come across as cheap and rude if you're asking for a lower price. Asking the seller to do a 20 dollar project for 5 isn't good etiquette, and unless the seller is desperate, you won't end up with a good working relationship. Have respect for other people's time and work, and they will respect you. There's a big difference between asking for five bucks off a 50 dollar order because of budget constraints and asking for 15 dollars off a 20 dollar project. 

#2 - Know the market you're working with

If you're shopping for low-cost services on Fiverr, you're in luck. There's thousands of gigs and some great deals to be had. But before you do, make sure you know the market. Shopping for a Scandinavian high-end and human translation? It's probably going to cost you a bit more because that market is more niche and has higher living costs for the people selling their services. 

Asking a Norwegian translator to translate 1000 words of marketing content for ten bucks manually is an insult: you'll barely get a cup of coffee in Norway for that, while it might be food for the whole family that day in a low-cost country. If you know your market, you'll have more success finding the right seller at the right price. 

#3 - Don't haggle if the seller says the rate is fixed

If you contact a buyer with a project description while asking for a reduced rate, and the buyer explains that their rate is fixed, that means it's fixed. If it's not within your budget range, you should acknowledge that, thank the seller for their time, and move on. 

#4 - Don't insult the seller or service offered

I've experienced this. Buyers who think they can get a better deal by explaining that translation is easy or that just speaking into a microphone isn't worth that much. Insulting a professional like that will not get you a better deal: it might get you blocked, though. 

#5 - "I can get it cheaper elsewhere". 

Ok. Then buy it elsewhere.

#6 - Don't make demands

Ask – don't demand. Some sellers will get angered by demands. This could even be "I'll pay you x for this". 

It might be meant as just a simple statement but can be considered a demand at the other end. Try asking politely instead. Remember, this is for your benefit since a friendly tone can get you a better deal. 

#7 - When you find a seller you like, keep working with them

As a seller, I might be more willing to offer better rates for regular buyers. If I know a buyer has spent 2000 dollars on gigs with me before, and they suddenly have a project that's a bit under budget, I'd be inclined to offer them a lowered rate to help them out. But starting the relationship with a mindset of "I'm gonna pay this seller a maximum 20% of his rates"? No deal. 

Wrapping up

  • Don't be cheap, but don't be afraid of looking for a good deal. If your budget is far off the set rates in the gig, look elsewhere. 
  • Know the market you're shopping in. 
  • Don't push for a lower rate if the buyer tells you the price is fixed. 
  • Don't insult the service or seller. 
  • Ask – don't demand. 
  • Maintain a good relationship with your sellers. In the long run, they might be more willing to help you out. 

(Fun story: This post was inspired by experiencing a single buyer who did all of these things: demanding a ridiculous offer on a small project as a first-time buyer (with me, not on the platform), telling me it's cheaper elsewhere, who kept on haggling after I said my rates are fixed, clearly didn't know the market they were shopping in by asking for at least two hours work for an absurd amount, and then ended up insulting me by explaining how easy my job was when I didn't budge. Let's say I said thanks, but no thanks.)

Thank you so much for information 

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I want to add my two cents to this discussion.
I am an illustrator, and sometimes my clients ask me to give them a small discount. And my way of giving them that is to reduce the amount of extra work I have to do. For example, I usually suggest working without agreeing on a sketch or without making edits. It turns out that I will do less work, and, accordingly, the final product will be cheaper. this works especially well for clients who have looked at my portfolio before ordering - they know what to expect from me, they know my style, and therefore trust my vision.
Another way to get a discount is for large projects or if you need illustrations on a regular basis. Order all images at once, not one at a time - I personally give discounts for large projects (like more than 10 illustrations in the same style) and many illustrators do too. 
Hope my experience helps someone!

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