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WHEN SHOULD WE CHECK HEART HEALTH?


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Our body consists of several organs, such as liver, lungs, kidneys, spleen, brain and so on. All these organs have their respective functions. Of course, to carry out its metabolic functions, nutrients are needed. Where does the supply of nutrients to these organs come from?
Yes, that's the main role of our heart, pumping nutrients to all organs of the body. Disturbance of one organ will affect the performance of other organs, either from interference with other organs that will damage the heart or vice versa from heart problems that can damage other organs. This is where it is important to have a health check, but checking all organs will certainly cost money. Therefore we must know some diseases that are at risk of causing heart problems before symptoms or serious complications appear.
The risk of heart disease is divided into 4 categories, ranging from low, moderate, high, and very high. Included in the VERY HIGH risk include those who have a history of heart attack, heart surgery, stroke, circulatory disorders in the limbs, the results of cardiac catheterization or CT-scan blood vessels with significant narrowing, diabetes mellitus more than 20 years or with complications, severe kidney disorders (including hemodialysis / dialysis), genetic cholesterol disorders (from a young age). Advanced with HIGH risk include hypertension, diabetes more than 10 years, high cholesterol and mild to moderate renal impairment. Then for MEDIUM risk for those with diabetes at a young age and an unhealthy lifestyle. Apart from that it is included in low risk.
To avoid the things above, it would be nice for us to prevent it with a healthy lifestyle and regular health control. What are they?
Quitting smoking (including any exposure to substances involved with smoking)
Consumption of foods that contain fiber, vegetables, fruit, fish and low in fat
Regular exercise (30 minutes of aerobic activity per day, at least 5 times a week)
Control body weight (body mass index 20-25 kg/m2) or waist circumference <94 cm (male) and <80 cm (female)
Blood pressure less than 140/90 mmHg
Target LDL cholesterol < 115 mg/dL and can be even lower if you are at very high risk.
Blood sugar control (HbA1c <7%)
Apart from that, it is important to know that any infectious disease will aggravate the performance of the heart. All of us should continue to maintain the health of ourselves and the surrounding environment by following the recommendations of the local health system in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic which has been proven to be fatal (the mortality risk reaches more than 50% for those with a history of heart disease).

7-faktor-risiko-jantung-berdetak-sangat-cepat-halodoc.jpg

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On 7/23/2021 at 1:00 PM, darusaja13 said:

Our body consists of several organs, such as liver, lungs, kidneys, spleen, brain and so on. All these organs have their respective functions. Of course, to carry out its metabolic functions, nutrients are needed. Where does the supply of nutrients to these organs come from?
Yes, that's the main role of our heart, pumping nutrients to all organs of the body. Disturbance of one organ will affect the performance of other organs, either from interference with other organs that will damage the heart or vice versa from heart problems that can damage other organs. This is where it is important to have a health check, but checking all organs will certainly cost money. Therefore we must know some diseases that are at risk of causing heart problems before symptoms or serious complications appear.
The risk of heart disease is divided into 4 categories, ranging from low, moderate, high, and very high. Included in the VERY HIGH risk include those who have a history of heart attack, heart surgery, stroke, circulatory disorders in the limbs, the results of cardiac catheterization or CT-scan blood vessels with significant narrowing, diabetes mellitus more than 20 years or with complications, severe kidney disorders (including hemodialysis / dialysis), genetic cholesterol disorders (from a young age). Advanced with HIGH risk include hypertension, diabetes more than 10 years, high cholesterol and mild to moderate renal impairment. Then for MEDIUM risk for those with diabetes at a young age and an unhealthy lifestyle. Apart from that it is included in low risk.
To avoid the things above, it would be nice for us to prevent it with a healthy lifestyle and regular health control. What are they?
Quitting smoking (including any exposure to substances involved with smoking)
Consumption of foods that contain fiber, vegetables, fruit, fish and low in fat
Regular exercise (30 minutes of aerobic activity per day, at least 5 times a week)
Control body weight (body mass index 20-25 kg/m2) or waist circumference <94 cm (male) and <80 cm (female)
Blood pressure less than 140/90 mmHg
Target LDL cholesterol < 115 mg/dL and can be even lower if you are at very high risk.
Blood sugar control (HbA1c <7%)
Apart from that, it is important to know that any infectious disease will aggravate the performance of the heart. All of us should continue to maintain the health of ourselves and the surrounding environment by following the recommendations of the local health system in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic which has been proven to be fatal (the mortality risk reaches more than 50% for those with a history of heart disease).

7-faktor-risiko-jantung-berdetak-sangat-cepat-halodoc.jpg

with that i will go with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) test, and Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring, also called a coronary calcium scan

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On 7/23/2021 at 6:00 PM, darusaja13 said:

Blood pressure less than 140/90 mmHg

Blood pressure should ideally be 120/80 mmHg. Even 130 is already considered Stage 1 Hypertension, your 140/90 is outdated. If you would share tips, you might as well use updated sources https://www.acc.org/latest-in-cardiology/articles/2017/11/08/11/47/mon-5pm-bp-guideline-aha-2017 or check American Heart Association Blood Pressure Categories.

A lot of your other tips are questionable and outdated. 

People of the forum, this is the worst place to get medical advice. Get it from your doctor who can make a personalized health plan for you. 

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