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A Few Tips for Buyer Requests


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@eliiclaire Here are the attachments:

Thanks in advance

Although I like that you are trying to receive the buyer’s expectations up front (I do the same thing), you also need to mention some of your qualifications. It’s important to have clear communication in the process you’ll take, but ultimately, you should think of your offer as a sales pitch. What training/experience do you have? Why are you the best fit for the project?

Again, there’s nothing wrong with clear communication, but first you want to prove to the buyer that you can complete the job properly.

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You are writing very well. I like your last line a lot but it doesn’t always happen because I send buyer requests with a lot of understanding so I go after many and the result buyer doesn’t hire me.

I understand, and I deal with the same issue a lot. Honestly, good buyers are less likely to be in the requests, so they’re harder to find. But ultimately, it’s better to take longer to find a good buyer than to immediately find a poor buyer that’s hard to deal with and potentially causes trouble to your account (through cancellations/low reviews).

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Although I like that you are trying to receive the buyer’s expectations up front (I do the same thing), you also need to mention some of your qualifications. It’s important to have clear communication in the process you’ll take, but ultimately, you should think of your offer as a sales pitch. What training/experience do you have? Why are you the best fit for the project?

Again, there’s nothing wrong with clear communication, but first you want to prove to the buyer that you can complete the job properly.

@eliiclaire Thank you for the suggestions. I have no official training as far as my gigs are concerned. I am self-taught. I thought it is a bad idea to mention that I have no training. I do mention my experience in my gig descriptions without trying to sound like I have no training. I also mention that I am more a hands-on kind of person. In order to prove that I can get the job done, I have provided many examples as a PDF in my gig gallery for all my gigs.

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You are writing very well. I like your last line a lot but it doesn’t always happen because I send buyer requests with a lot of understanding so I go after many and the result buyer doesn’t hire me.

@opumak Every buyer will have different requirements. I don’t know, but it could be that mentioning that last line will make a prospective buyer will think that the seller will bump up the price in order to get more money just for the sake of it. On the other hand, you don’t want to undercut yourself with the offer amount and delivery time without having a clear picture of what the buyer needs. The seller needs to earn too. That is why I mention that the price and delivery time are indicative. Thank you for your review.

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@eliiclaire Thank you for the suggestions. I have no official training as far as my gigs are concerned. I am self-taught. I thought it is a bad idea to mention that I have no training. I do mention my experience in my gig descriptions without trying to sound like I have no training. I also mention that I am more a hands-on kind of person. In order to prove that I can get the job done, I have provided many examples as a PDF in my gig gallery for all my gigs.

Since you have a large number of examples, you could ask the buyer to refer to your gig gallery! Also, you don’t need official training as long as you have proof that you can do the job well.

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Edit: Before you read this, I wanted to point out some recent issues in buyer requests. At least in the writing section, there have been a lot more spam offers in the last few weeks. So, here’s some buyer requests you should avoid:

Vague Requests : If the buyer request lacks a prompt, word count, clear sense of direction, etc, do not send an offer. More likely than not, the buyer will struggle to provide clarity during the actual order, or they are trying to trick you into doing an order you would not typically do for the timeframe/price.

Bulk Requests : At least in the writing section, there have been a lot of bulk-sized requests lately. Essentially, they will have a budget of $100, so you think it’s a good request to respond to at first. But when you look at the description, they expect you to do something like twenty 1,500-word articles in a month. Along with actually being pretty cheap, you risk having a nightmare order if the buyer lacks communication and you have a long-term project on your hands.

Even if the request is fairly priced, I would personally avoid long-term orders through buyer requests, just because they may scam you out of hours’ worth of work if you’re not careful.

Along with these two issues that have been popping up more lately, avoid the basic signs of scams: overly cheap requests, asking for free samples, asking to inbox instead of sending an offer, requesting work that violates the TOS (especially academic/unethical work), etc.

If you have noticed some other common scams in buyer requests (especially if you’re in a category outside of writing/editing), feel free to mention them in the comments.


I have noticed that a lot of people have been asking for tips with buyer requests lately. Because I am honestly a bit lazy and don’t want to answer each question, I figured making one in-depth post would do the trick.

Why you should use buyer requests:

I know that a lot of people have warned about buyer requests, and I understand their reasoning with so many scammers, but I have personally found it to be a very useful tool. The majority of my orders have come from buyer requests, and all of them have been excellent experiences. Especially if you’re just starting off, or if you hit a plateau with orders/impressions, buyer requests can give you the momentum you need.

The actual tips:

First of all, always ensure that you are able to do what the buyer is asking. It may seem frustrating to ignore all of the unreasonable/irrelevant requests. However, if you receive an order from the buyer who made the request, you can guarantee that either your work will be low-quality or you will deal with a scammer/frustrating buyer.

Secondly, when you submit an offer, take an extra moment to read through the offer again. In your offer, clearly write that you can deliver that specific service, and ask for clarification if needed. This will help the buyer see that you have read their request, and requesting clarification will protect you from any buyers trying to trick you into giving them an unrealistic service.

Finally, always take an extra moment to read through your offer for grammar and clarity. It is always better to have the highest-quality offer than the first offer sent. On this note, avoid making copy-paste offers. Each buyer is different, and you need to customize your offer based on their needs.

Hopefully this helps! The main point I have here is to take an extra moment, so you can set expectations up front for both yourself and the buyer. Even if you are not the first offer sent, high-quality buyers will be searching for high-quality sellers rather than the fastest responder.

Thanks for your suggestion.

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