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Can anyone suggest best Microphone


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There are plenty of microphones to use, but it mostly comes down to your set up and budget.
The Blue Yeti or the Rode Podcaster are good if you’re going direct USB.
I use a Rode NT2-A and the Shure SM7B Cardioid Dynamic Microphone in-studio, and the Blue Yeti, when on the road.
“Best” will depend on your set up, your physical recording environment (how soundproof it is) and how you edit…all to get to your delivery track.
Good luck.

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There are plenty of microphones to use, but it mostly comes down to your set up and budget.

The Blue Yeti or the Rode Podcaster are good if you’re going direct USB.

I use a Rode NT2-A and the Shure SM7B Cardioid Dynamic Microphone in-studio, and the Blue Yeti, when on the road.

“Best” will depend on your set up, your physical recording environment (how soundproof it is) and how you edit…all to get to your delivery track.

Good luck.

Hi, I don’t have a good set up right now, I’m just starting to set all.

Also don’t have a soundproof studio. As i’m starting tell me the best as per that.

does acoustic panels help to get a room sound proof properly?

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Its 5k as i’m starting

What currency? Also, acoustic panels aren’t for sound proofing. Sound proofing is when you treat a room so that no sound gets in/out.

Acoustic panels are for absorbing sound waves. They help prevent sound from bouncing around the room and back into your microphone. Of course, you should still get some, but that’s only the first step of properly sound treating a room.

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What currency? Also, acoustic panels aren’t for sound proofing. Sound proofing is when you treat a room so that no sound gets in/out.

Acoustic panels are for absorbing sound waves. They help prevent sound from bouncing around the room and back into your microphone. Of course, you should still get some, but that’s only the first step of properly sound treating a room.

currency is INR

actually i don’t have a huge problem of sound, is that just the insects sound.

what should i use?

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Hi, I don’t have a good set up right now, I’m just starting to set all.

Also don’t have a soundproof studio. As i’m starting tell me the best as per that.

does acoustic panels help to get a room sound proof properly?

As mentioned there is soundproofing and sound absorbing. The more viable solution as you are starting out would be sound absorption. So, yes, acoustic panels help with sound absorption…to be clear, any ‘soft’ surface or surfaces in your recording environment will help deaden noise, echos or sound bouncing. Sound ‘proof’ curtains, carpet or rugs on the floor a sofa or chair in the room, panels or a towel on the desk…etc.

In my opinion, the keys to your recording quality are a good, unidirectional mic, the ability to edit our ambient noise in your track and your ability to deliver a read on a good script. The rest you’ll pick up as you go along.

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As mentioned there is soundproofing and sound absorbing. The more viable solution as you are starting out would be sound absorption. So, yes, acoustic panels help with sound absorption…to be clear, any ‘soft’ surface or surfaces in your recording environment will help deaden noise, echos or sound bouncing. Sound ‘proof’ curtains, carpet or rugs on the floor a sofa or chair in the room, panels or a towel on the desk…etc.

In my opinion, the keys to your recording quality are a good, unidirectional mic, the ability to edit our ambient noise in your track and your ability to deliver a read on a good script. The rest you’ll pick up as you go along.

thank you so much for your suggestion,

in this circumstances which mic I should use?

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currency is INR

actually i don’t have a huge problem of sound, is that just the insects sound.

what should i use?

So that’s around £53, or $66.

This limits you to a USB microphone, which I personally would avoid but I suppose is a good starting point. I can only personally recommend a blue snowball at that price, as every other microphone I’ve used has been more expensive.

Though when you do get to a point where you’re ready and willing to spend more:

An Audio Technica AT2035 paired with a Scarlett Focusrite Solo XLR interface is quite good. The AT2035 in general is a great microphone for its price (~£150), and I used one for a few years with a couple different interfaces. You could also go with an AT2020 USB if you don’t want to buy an interface - that mic is ~£120.

Also +1 for the SM7B (£350). Keep in mind that you may have to buy a Cloudlifter (£150, for additional gain) as well as an interface though.

At the moment I use an Aston Stealth (£250) paired with a GoXLR Mini (previously a Line 6 UX2). I was actually going to buy the SM7B, but went with the Stealth because it essentially has a cloudlifter built into it.

Edit: I should add that if you do get acoustic panels, which I think you should, you’ll have to increase your budget a bit. The blue snowball would probably take up your entire existing budget.

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So that’s around £53, or $66.

This limits you to a USB microphone, which I personally would avoid but I suppose is a good starting point. I can only personally recommend a blue snowball at that price, as every other microphone I’ve used has been more expensive.

Though when you do get to a point where you’re ready and willing to spend more:

An Audio Technica AT2035 paired with a Scarlett Focusrite Solo XLR interface is quite good. The AT2035 in general is a great microphone for its price (~£150), and I used one for a few years with a couple different interfaces. You could also go with an AT2020 USB if you don’t want to buy an interface - that mic is ~£120.

Also +1 for the SM7B (£350). Keep in mind that you may have to buy a Cloudlifter (£150, for additional gain) as well as an interface though.

At the moment I use an Aston Stealth (£250) paired with a GoXLR Mini (previously a Line 6 UX2). I was actually going to buy the SM7B, but went with the Stealth because it essentially has a cloudlifter built into it.

Edit: I should add that if you do get acoustic panels, which I think you should, you’ll have to increase your budget a bit. The blue snowball would probably take up your entire existing budget.

Ok thanks for your suggestion 😊

one thing more tell me

for the insects sound will acoustic panel will help??

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Ok thanks for your suggestion 😊

one thing more tell me

for the insects sound will acoustic panel will help??

Well, they will help stop the insect noises from reverberating around the room.

They won’t prevent the noises from being heard in your audio though. For that you will need to configure a noise gate. Without an interface that has built-in noise gate software, you’ll have to use something like Voicemeeter Banana (a free program) for that.

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  • 7 months later...

There are very many microphones available for recording, and a vast price range. When choosing a microphone, “budget” is one of the main considerations. It’s pointless recommending a $2000 microphone to someone that has a $50 budget. Conversely, if a person has a $2000 budget, they can afford a microphone that is better than any $50 microphone.
[note: you should check your mic at mic test online]
I’ve not personally found any microphone that I would consider to be a reasonable voice recording mic for under about $100, though I have used many “stage microphone” that cost considerably more than $100 that I would not recommend for voice recording.

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