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I'm going to share something very personal with you guys 🤫


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MY DNA ANCESTRY RESULTS (Boring white bread American here) from 23andme:

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All my ancestors came to America in the 1600s. The test I took cost about $99 from 23andme and I found thousands of close and distant cousins I never knew I had.

Lots of people find a lot of unexpected things about themselves, such as being adopted, or related to others in some way they didn’t expect, or having a mixed heritage of various races. It can be quite fascinating. Mine was not unexpected.

I do have at least one Native American ancestor which is not shown here, and Mongolian also which is probably related to Native Americans, since this was one of this company’s earliest versions of the test and has since been improved several times.

I’m also partially Neanderthal, like most Europeans. 🐵

I recommend this test to anyone who is curious about where their ancestors came from. A better alternative in my opinion is Ancestry for this service.

Summary

Please forgive the clickbait title

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When I get to my other computer later I will also post the results I got from Ancestry. They are a little bit different. Each site uses different testing methods, all based on thousands of tests of various peoples all over the world used for comparison.

Ancestry has a much better site if you are interested in researching your ancestors and living relatives. I have literally about 4000 distant cousins and more arriving every day on these two sites combined.

I was thrilled to finally learn the identity and history of my Native American ancestor, and even find an old photo of her, a Cherokee woman from N. Carolina who was fully integrated into the English society of the time. Americans love finding they have Native American ancestry.

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What would be more interesting to me is learning why my ancestors came here. Unfortunately I will never know all the reasons they decided to make that dangerous voyage of several months, on a wooden vessel propelled only by huge sails, to a new land, unsettled and with primitive hazardous living conditions, scarce food, new diseases, warrior native Americans unhappy with their arrival etc.

I know in general they were hoping to find freedom, opportunities, religious freedom and a way of life better than the ones they left behind.

Some may have been sent here by London to get rid of them as undesirables also.

I read the account of one who was one of the first arrivals here who was 20, a servant, and was a known troublemaker who let people’s cows out, stole other animals and was somewhat of a terror.

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MY DNA ANCESTRY RESULTS (Boring white bread American here) from 23andme:

All my ancestors came to America in the 1600s. The test I took cost about $99 from 23andme and I found thousands of close and distant cousins I never knew I had.

Lots of people find a lot of unexpected things about themselves, such as being adopted, or related to others in some way they didn’t expect, or having a mixed heritage of various races. It can be quite fascinating. Mine was not unexpected.

I do have at least one Native American ancestor which is not shown here, and Mongolian also which is probably related to Native Americans, since this was one of this company’s earliest versions of the test and has since been improved several times.

I’m also partially Neanderthal, like most Europeans. 🐵

I recommend this test to anyone who is curious about where their ancestors came from. A better alternative in my opinion is Ancestry for this service.

Summary

Please forgive the clickbait title

All my ancestors came to America in the 1600s

Would have been a bad time for you to have been around Massachusetts

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@eoinfinnegan You got THAT right!

Here is the home, still standing, of one of my ancestors who was born in 1750.

😉

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Sadly, it was never mine, really. My great grandmother’s grandfather was just the head gamekeeper and had a cottage somewhere in the grounds. I quite like, though, how I’m just to steps away from someone who new Sir Walter Scott.

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My ancestral home was bigger. 😉

abbotsford-the-stunning

Sadly, it was never mine, really. My great grandmother’s grandfather was just the head gamekeeper and had a cottage somewhere in the grounds. I quite like, though, how I’m just to steps away from someone who new Sir Walter Scott.

I wonder what it costs per month to heat and air condition that place.

Here is my home in a previous lifetime, a rice plantation in the state of Georgia:

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I lived there in the 1800’s. A hypnosis session brought it all back including the unusual name of the place (Hofwyl) and the trauma of the Civil War. After that session I googled it. It explained a lot, learning about this.

I had memories of part of that life as a very small child, my first name, the slaves.

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Here are my results from Ancestry dot com:

AncestryDNA tests for all 1,000+ regions listed below. You are linked only to the regions that appear in your estimate.

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So this one shows much more Scandinavian. It all depends on which original samples of various regions they compare your DNA to. This site has more samples from Scandinavia.

I now have my complete family tree back to 1630 for most ancestors. Before that I would need to pay more for records in England. And when you go back 400 years there isn’t much DNA match left to compare. It’s compared to the DNA of others on the site who match your DNA and from there you can see their family trees and see which ancestors you had in common. I share very little DNA with my 6th or 7th cousins.

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Here are my results from Ancestry dot com:

AncestryDNA tests for all 1,000+ regions listed below. You are linked only to the regions that appear in your estimate.

So this one shows much more Scandinavian. It all depends on which original samples of various regions they compare your DNA to. This site has more samples from Scandinavia.

I now have my complete family tree back to 1630 for most ancestors. Before that I would need to pay more for records in England. And when you go back 400 years there isn’t much DNA match left to compare. It’s compared to the DNA of others on the site who match your DNA and from there you can see their family trees and see which ancestors you had in common. I share very little DNA with my 6th or 7th cousins.

now have my complete family tree back to 1630 for most ancestors.

My cousin has traced our family tree back to the 1200s.

Sarah Rapalje was the first white female child born in New Netherland in the US and is my 7 times removed grandmother.

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now have my complete family tree back to 1630 for most ancestors.

My cousin has traced our family tree back to the 1200s.

Sarah Rapalje was the first white female child born in New Netherland in the US and is my 7 times removed grandmother.

Sarah Rapalje was the first white female child born in New Netherland in the US and is my 7 times removed grandmother.

That’s very impressive! What a lot of work it takes to do this. The number of ancestors multiples exponentially with each generation back.

I was thrilled to find one ancestor who arrived on the Mayflower.

I have some Dutch ancestors but Holland isn’t showing up as a location in my DNA. And none of my ancestors have Swedish or Norwegian names although I read they changed their names to English sounding ones upon arrival in the New World.

It gets more interesting the more I find out.

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