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Can I use for fiverr for baking?


angels_roses
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You have asked about baking. - Put simply, no, it is not possible to use Fiverr for baking. At least, if you mean baking goods and sending them via mail to buyers. There are several food safety and basic practicality problems with this idea.

I agree! It’s not safe. A buyer wouldn’t know how the food is handled. The temperature and storage, etc. It’s just too risky to take a chance.

Things you could do could include:

  • Selling recipes.
  • Creating baking videos.
  • Offering baking related article writing.

@angels_roses Cy offered golden tips.

To add to Cy’s list, maybe set up shop at a local farmer’s market.

I shall once there is there one in my hometown.

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I’m still in High School really. I graduate in 2021 and I was going to fix it but I don’t know how.

Wow! Now that I can applaud, being willing to entrepreneur before even graduating!

Have you held any ‘real world’ jobs before? You’ll get a HUGE amount of customer service experience, understanding of buyer mentality, and most importantly: credentials, if you can get a job for the upcoming summer between semesters. Actually, you can probably start even sooner! If your school has sporting events, volunteer to help in a concession stand for a game or two!

Now you’ve got me excited to watch your growth!

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Wow! Now that I can applaud, being willing to entrepreneur before even graduating!

Have you held any ‘real world’ jobs before? You’ll get a HUGE amount of customer service experience, understanding of buyer mentality, and most importantly: credentials, if you can get a job for the upcoming summer between semesters. Actually, you can probably start even sooner! If your school has sporting events, volunteer to help in a concession stand for a game or two!

Now you’ve got me excited to watch your growth!

Thanks!

I haven’t had a ‘real word’ job yet and I’m on an online school so they don’t have any games. Since I am bad at everything, what do you think I should do?

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Thanks!

I haven’t had a ‘real word’ job yet and I’m on an online school so they don’t have any games. Since I am bad at everything, what do you think I should do?

Since I am bad at everything, what do you think I should do?

I don’t know but you’re in the right place.

I think you could be a writer with some basic knowledge of how fiverr works for that.

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Hey! I’m a voice actress as well, so I thought since you asked for advice on avoiding some basic mistakes I’d give you two tips I used when I started out.

  1. Record a full demo. You don’t need to make it long (1-2 minutes is fine!), and each “section” of the script only needs to be about 10-15 seconds long, but you need more examples than one sentence. Focus on either a specific type of voice acting (like video games, which your demo sounded like) or cover a broader range. Most of my clients look for commercial scripts so you’d want some examples of that in your demo. 1 sentence, no matter the audio quality, is not going to be enough for a buyer to choose if they want to work with you. (Though you do need to fix the quality and learn to do basic editing like noise reduction, which you can do very easily for free in audacity. Others have already mentioned this so I’ll move on)

  2. Price yourself competitively. When I started out, I was able to get a high number of clients very quickly despite my lack of reviews here because I charged a lot less than most other VAs, then increased my pricing as I got more popular. You’re charging the same as I do now, with nearly 1,000 5 star reviews and being a level 2 seller. This IS fine, it’s completely up to you how you decide to price yourself, but pricing yourself at that level you will need to have the quality match up to other sellers at that price range (because why would people choose you over someone else when your gig costs the same but the audio quality is worse and you don’t have any reviews? Which seller would YOU choose? That question should always be in your mind when you’re writing and improving your gigs)

Your mindset shouldn’t be “I’m bad at everything, what should I do”, it should be “What do I enjoy enough to put the work into in order to become good at it?”

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Thanks!

I haven’t had a ‘real word’ job yet and I’m on an online school so they don’t have any games. Since I am bad at everything, what do you think I should do?

I wouldn’t say that about yourself. Everyone is good at something.

What are some of your other hobbies? 💡 Brainstorm a few things you’re good at and go from there.

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First, thank you for being willing to listen. That’s an immediate bonus to any employer. Second, stop. Do NOT be that hard on yourself, ‘bad at everything’ is plain not true now that I can plainly tell you’re willing to put yourself out there. You’re here after all.

And now I’m really sorry that my first assessment came off as harsh. One thing you might figure out very quickly while hanging around the forums is that there are a lot of new sellers who are here trying to make a quick buck, and have little clue what they’re doing.

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Hey! I’m a voice actress as well, so I thought since you asked for advice on avoiding some basic mistakes I’d give you two tips I used when I started out.

  1. Record a full demo. You don’t need to make it long (1-2 minutes is fine!), and each “section” of the script only needs to be about 10-15 seconds long, but you need more examples than one sentence. Focus on either a specific type of voice acting (like video games, which your demo sounded like) or cover a broader range. Most of my clients look for commercial scripts so you’d want some examples of that in your demo. 1 sentence, no matter the audio quality, is not going to be enough for a buyer to choose if they want to work with you. (Though you do need to fix the quality and learn to do basic editing like noise reduction, which you can do very easily for free in audacity. Others have already mentioned this so I’ll move on)

  2. Price yourself competitively. When I started out, I was able to get a high number of clients very quickly despite my lack of reviews here because I charged a lot less than most other VAs, then increased my pricing as I got more popular. You’re charging the same as I do now, with nearly 1,000 5 star reviews and being a level 2 seller. This IS fine, it’s completely up to you how you decide to price yourself, but pricing yourself at that level you will need to have the quality match up to other sellers at that price range (because why would people choose you over someone else when your gig costs the same but the audio quality is worse and you don’t have any reviews? Which seller would YOU choose? That question should always be in your mind when you’re writing and improving your gigs)

Your mindset shouldn’t be “I’m bad at everything, what should I do”, it should be “What do I enjoy enough to put the work into in order to become good at it?”

Thank you very much!

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Hey! I’m a voice actress as well, so I thought since you asked for advice on avoiding some basic mistakes I’d give you two tips I used when I started out.

  1. Record a full demo. You don’t need to make it long (1-2 minutes is fine!), and each “section” of the script only needs to be about 10-15 seconds long, but you need more examples than one sentence. Focus on either a specific type of voice acting (like video games, which your demo sounded like) or cover a broader range. Most of my clients look for commercial scripts so you’d want some examples of that in your demo. 1 sentence, no matter the audio quality, is not going to be enough for a buyer to choose if they want to work with you. (Though you do need to fix the quality and learn to do basic editing like noise reduction, which you can do very easily for free in audacity. Others have already mentioned this so I’ll move on)

  2. Price yourself competitively. When I started out, I was able to get a high number of clients very quickly despite my lack of reviews here because I charged a lot less than most other VAs, then increased my pricing as I got more popular. You’re charging the same as I do now, with nearly 1,000 5 star reviews and being a level 2 seller. This IS fine, it’s completely up to you how you decide to price yourself, but pricing yourself at that level you will need to have the quality match up to other sellers at that price range (because why would people choose you over someone else when your gig costs the same but the audio quality is worse and you don’t have any reviews? Which seller would YOU choose? That question should always be in your mind when you’re writing and improving your gigs)

Your mindset shouldn’t be “I’m bad at everything, what should I do”, it should be “What do I enjoy enough to put the work into in order to become good at it?”

Can you give me some recommendations for the prices I should set?

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Now as for a question of ‘what can you do’ you have to do some set-up first. A big part of getting to where you want to be is knowing where that is in the first place. Second is researching how to get there, which can sometimes tie into the first part, as you will learn more about what you like and don’t like as you look into things. Goal setting is critical, short-term and long-term.

For now you asked about short-term jobs. I Googled the town you put in your profile, and I see why there might be an issue getting started. I’m guessing the local kids mostly bus to another town for school? Or are most of them online like you?

Also, I’m getting very off-topic in relation to your original post. Would you prefer I move to a direct message?

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Now as for a question of ‘what can you do’ you have to do some set-up first. A big part of getting to where you want to be is knowing where that is in the first place. Second is researching how to get there, which can sometimes tie into the first part, as you will learn more about what you like and don’t like as you look into things. Goal setting is critical, short-term and long-term.

For now you asked about short-term jobs. I Googled the town you put in your profile, and I see why there might be an issue getting started. I’m guessing the local kids mostly bus to another town for school? Or are most of them online like you?

Also, I’m getting very off-topic in relation to your original post. Would you prefer I move to a direct message?

Direct would be easier and better, thank you. Most students ride the bus and almost no-one is on an online in my hometown.

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Can you give me some recommendations for the prices I should set?

To be honest, one of the best things you can do as a new seller is learn to browse through similar gigs in your category and start comparing the prices, the offerings, the gig quality etc. This will teach you how to have better intuition with regards to how you design your gigs and choose your prices.

Honestly I’m probably not the best person to ask because I aaaalways get told on the forums that my prices are still too low, but I will tell you that when I started out, I was charging $5 for a 500 word recording with 2 day delivery and 2 revisions. I was using a Zoom H2N second hand mic which you can get for about $80, retailing new at about $160. I’ve since upgraded to a better mic, but that initial mic is still pretty darn good. It was the combination of low prices while still having a very high mic quality that was able to get me sales. Using a $20 mic or some such likely won’t get you a high amount of work, even if you price it low, because people want quality content for whatever it is they’re producing - they’re paying people to do this for them BECAUSE they don’t want to use a $20 mic that they could likely just pick up themselves.

It’s definitely worth the investment in a good mic if you’re willing to stick with it, I became a level 1 seller in about 2 months and now I do this as my main source of income.

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To be honest, one of the best things you can do as a new seller is learn to browse through similar gigs in your category and start comparing the prices, the offerings, the gig quality etc. This will teach you how to have better intuition with regards to how you design your gigs and choose your prices.

Honestly I’m probably not the best person to ask because I aaaalways get told on the forums that my prices are still too low, but I will tell you that when I started out, I was charging $5 for a 500 word recording with 2 day delivery and 2 revisions. I was using a Zoom H2N second hand mic which you can get for about $80, retailing new at about $160. I’ve since upgraded to a better mic, but that initial mic is still pretty darn good. It was the combination of low prices while still having a very high mic quality that was able to get me sales. Using a $20 mic or some such likely won’t get you a high amount of work, even if you price it low, because people want quality content for whatever it is they’re producing - they’re paying people to do this for them BECAUSE they don’t want to use a $20 mic that they could likely just pick up themselves.

It’s definitely worth the investment in a good mic if you’re willing to stick with it, I became a level 1 seller in about 2 months and now I do this as my main source of income.

I have a Fifine microphone which I got for Christmas. Thank you for this.

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I have a Fifine microphone which I got for Christmas. Thank you for this.

To be honest, you will need to upgrade your microphone. Even the blue yeti mics are seen as the bottom of the barrel when it comes to voice-overs, and the Fifine mic has been compared to a slightly worse version of that (being slightly less good in quality but a lot cheaper)

It’s definitely better than a laptop mic, you’ll be able to create a better demo and you MAY manage to get a few orders if you price yourself low enough for people who are on a serious budget, but you’d need to upgrade to a better ASAP once you get a couple of orders in. The Fifine mic is fine for stuff like gaming or making videos for youtube or even podcasts, but a lot of the people who are ordering voiceovers on Fiverr want professional sound quality because they’re using your voice to advertise products on the radio etc. I’m sorry to be disheartening - it’s not the worst mic out there and you can certainly use it to practice and perhaps even get a bit of paid experience, but if you’re serious about voice acting as a job you’ll need to spend at least $60-80ish on a good second hand microphone to get the quality you need - as I mentioned, $20-30 won’t be enough as if people wanted that level of sound quality they could just buy one and record it themselves, since this would be about the same price as hiring a voice actor which an actual professional microphone for a small job.

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To be honest, you will need to upgrade your microphone. Even the blue yeti mics are seen as the bottom of the barrel when it comes to voice-overs, and the Fifine mic has been compared to a slightly worse version of that (being slightly less good in quality but a lot cheaper)

It’s definitely better than a laptop mic, you’ll be able to create a better demo and you MAY manage to get a few orders if you price yourself low enough for people who are on a serious budget, but you’d need to upgrade to a better ASAP once you get a couple of orders in. The Fifine mic is fine for stuff like gaming or making videos for youtube or even podcasts, but a lot of the people who are ordering voiceovers on Fiverr want professional sound quality because they’re using your voice to advertise products on the radio etc. I’m sorry to be disheartening - it’s not the worst mic out there and you can certainly use it to practice and perhaps even get a bit of paid experience, but if you’re serious about voice acting as a job you’ll need to spend at least $60-80ish on a good second hand microphone to get the quality you need - as I mentioned, $20-30 won’t be enough as if people wanted that level of sound quality they could just buy one and record it themselves, since this would be about the same price as hiring a voice actor which an actual professional microphone for a small job.

So my parents spent around $20/$30ish for this microphone? Now I have no idea of what I can do.

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So my parents spent around $20/$30ish for this microphone? Now I have no idea of what I can do.

To be honest I feel a little rude (perhaps even grinchy) telling you the specific cost of something your parents got for you as a gift (I’m very much a believer in prices not being relevant as much as the thought and care that goes into selecting meaningful and personalised gifts that people will love), but the Fifine mic is around the $27 range, yes.

I don’t think you should give up, though. There will certainly be people on a very, very tight budget who just need the cheapest option they can get for voice work, and the Fifine mic will be good enough in quality to cater to these clients. If you price yourself well you could probably make enough sales in order to get a better mic within a couple of months, and that time will allow you to practice, get some experience and some good reviews, so you’ll be in a very strong position to do well once you get the better mic.

When I first started doing video game voiceovers when I was like 17, I literally used my iPhone microphone. I was just doing voluntary work for indie games for free, but it got me a lot of valuable experience and I used that time to learn how to edit my audio and get better at voice acting. Time spent practicing and learning is NOT time wasted.

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Thanks! Would you like to talk in a direct chat?

No, did you see this I sent?

I don’t know anything about voiceovers but you can read about what you need and might get some orders:

fiverr-favicon.icoblog.fiverr.com – 17 Aug 16
work-from-home-voice-over.png.6b88a7469c7747983624e8c5b22b00a5.png

7 Tips on How to Work from Home as a Voice Over Artist - Fiverr Blog

Today, with the growing popularity of podcasts and audiobooks – there are lots of opportunities for people to develop a main or second career in Voice Over.

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