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Top 5 Communication Skills You Need When Dealing With Difficult Buyers


smashradio
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One thing I’ve learned on Fiverr

You really don’t know who your dealing with.

It’s worse than online poker, were the only “tell” is how they are betting.

I had clients pretend to be from the huge company their script seems to indicate…only to find out they are not…It was just a way of making you feel important so you will drag them to the top of the pile, and provide endless revisions…

So (just like life) if your a $5 or $500 client . You will get treated the same.

I had clients pretend to be from the huge company their script seems to indicate…only to find out they are not…It was just a way of making you feel important

I don’t get this anymore on Fiverr. What I do get is a lot of people who find me elsewhere online, who want to do business off-Fiverr… But think this means they can pay less?

I don’t get whatever logic they are using. I even had one person recently message me on Linkedin and give me an amazing pitch about how they had seen my reviews on Fiverr, were an exciting marketing agency, and wanted me to write a test piece, after which I may qualify to become one of their full-time, $6 per article writers.

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You’re a lucky charm. I just received a tip right after I saw your meme.

@steve_maxell - this is very true. You never know who you’re dealing with. I had the same experience - buyers who give the impression they’re from a huge corporation, turning out to be a local franchise in a real estate company instead.

I treat all my clients the same - and my 15 dollar orders gets the same attention and engagement as my 1500 ones.

Congrats on your Tip. We have similarity, I also work at night time. I go to sleep at 10/11 AM. Though my brain stops creativity after 7 AM.

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Congrats on your Tip. We have similarity, I also work at night time. I go to sleep at 10/11 AM. Though my brain stops creativity after 7 AM.

Indeed, the creativity stops for me around 3-4 am - unless I have a lot of coffee. As a VO I find night is the best time to work. I’m in the dark of my booth anyway, but at night, at least it’s quiet.

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Indeed, the creativity stops for me around 3-4 am - unless I have a lot of coffee. As a VO I find night is the best time to work. I’m in the dark of my booth anyway, but at night, at least it’s quiet.

Superb article! Many things to learn from here. Thanks for your amazing article.

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I’m down with a lot of this, politeness is par for the course. But, I would say never say sorry or apologize for anything. Unless you know it was your fault for sure. In fact if you can avoid saying the word sorry and substitute it at all times the better., unless you have a close relationship with a person. It’s logical if you think about it.

And my most important mantra …

Don’t let ANYONE ever be personally offensive towards you or your work. Leave people like this in the dust nothing good ever comes from people who like berating others.

Sounds cold, but I find it keeps things proffesional if things go south.

That’s just me…

100% agree with Steve on this.

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Mike (buyer): This logo is useless to us!! How do you expect me to use a logo with this ugly color? It looks like ***. You claimed to be a professional designer but this looks like something a 4-year-old would do!

“I expect you to communicate in a polite way at all times with me. I will be happy to do a revision but I do not tolerate abuse. As soon as you apologize to me we can continue.”

Let them know it’s not ok to be abusive! Don’t just go on like what they said was normal and ok when they say things like that. I see the OP did mention that it’s important to let them know they can’t be abusive.

I always expect an apology before I can continue. Because I really do not want to continue at all but I’m giving them one last chance.

Excellent communicative communication

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I’m down with a lot of this, politeness is par for the course. But, I would say never say sorry or apologize for anything. Unless you know it was your fault for sure. In fact if you can avoid saying the word sorry and substitute it at all times the better., unless you have a close relationship with a person. It’s logical if you think about it.

And my most important mantra …

Don’t let ANYONE ever be personally offensive towards you or your work. Leave people like this in the dust nothing good ever comes from people who like berating others.

Sounds cold, but I find it keeps things proffesional if things go south.

That’s just me…

good point after all

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