Jump to content

No Orders From Last Week


zepto_designers

Recommended Posts

Why do sellers keep asking this question? We have no idea why your orders are at a low point. If you want more buyers, start marketing and promoting your services to the target customers who need your services.

People are frustrated! They invest a lot of time creating gig images (or paying someone to do it), writing a gig description, choosing a gig title, searching keywords to see what’s selling, creating gigs, etc. Then some of them spend time sharing their gigs, bidding on buyers requests, etc.

Then when sales don’t come, they feel bad. They ask themselves, “Why do they hate me? Why is nobody buying? What am I doing wrong? Why does that guy have 17 in his queue? How come I’m charging $5 and he’s getting all those orders?”

So they come to the forum to vent. It’s understandable.

What’s the big deal?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

People are frustrated! They invest a lot of time creating gig images (or paying someone to do it), writing a gig description, choosing a gig title, searching keywords to see what’s selling, creating gigs, etc. Then some of them spend time sharing their gigs, bidding on buyers requests, etc.

Then when sales don’t come, they feel bad. They ask themselves, “Why do they hate me? Why is nobody buying? What am I doing wrong? Why does that guy have 17 in his queue? How come I’m charging $5 and he’s getting all those orders?”

So they come to the forum to vent. It’s understandable.

What’s the big deal?

Then when sales don’t come, they feel bad. They ask themselves, “Why do they hate me? Why is nobody buying? What am I doing wrong? Why does that guy have 17 in his queue? How come I’m charging $5 and he’s getting all those orders?”

The key is the visibility or in their case the invisibility. Assuming their gigs are truly decent enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

People are frustrated! They invest a lot of time creating gig images (or paying someone to do it), writing a gig description, choosing a gig title, searching keywords to see what’s selling, creating gigs, etc. Then some of them spend time sharing their gigs, bidding on buyers requests, etc.

Then when sales don’t come, they feel bad. They ask themselves, “Why do they hate me? Why is nobody buying? What am I doing wrong? Why does that guy have 17 in his queue? How come I’m charging $5 and he’s getting all those orders?”

So they come to the forum to vent. It’s understandable.

What’s the big deal?

What’s the big deal?

The “big deal” is that they aren’t doing what is truly necessary to grow their business, and then they come here to complain that they aren’t getting sales, when all they’re doing is changing their gig images, constantly rewriting their gig descriptions, and waiting for Fiverr to make them successful.

Fiverr does not guarantee sales, so if a seller doesn’t have as many sales as they want, they are going to have to go out into the world, find the people who need their services, and convince them to hire them. Every business does this. Every business has to do this if they want to compete. It constantly baffles me how many sellers come to Fiverr, and think that the rules of business don’t apply here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dunno, up to a CERTAIN point, I do get people wanting to vent and rant
about their worries and concerns about low sales, so I’m with @fastcopywriter on that.
(I mean, I go through some angry b*tchy ranting mode every now and then!)
Having that said, we do see way too many sellers who complain when a lot of them are
clearly not putting in enough time and effort, and being a frequent forum user, I must admit I have that “oh here they go again” reaction when I see those posts, so I can understand @jonbaas 's reaction as well.
Maybe it depends on how people vent.

BTW @fastcopywriter, I see the birthday cake icon.
Happy birthday!
I get the impression that you are quite the workaholic, stay away from work today,
be sure to go out and celebrate 🍾

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dunno, up to a CERTAIN point, I do get people wanting to vent and rant

about their worries and concerns about low sales, so I’m with @fastcopywriter on that.

(I mean, I go through some angry b*tchy ranting mode every now and then!)

Having that said, we do see way too many sellers who complain when a lot of them are

clearly not putting in enough time and effort, and being a frequent forum user, I must admit I have that “oh here they go again” reaction when I see those posts, so I can understand @jonbaas 's reaction as well.

Maybe it depends on how people vent.

BTW @fastcopywriter, I see the birthday cake icon.

Happy birthday!

I get the impression that you are quite the workaholic, stay away from work today,

be sure to go out and celebrate 🍾

Happy birthday!

I get the impression that you are quite the workaholic, stay away from work today,

Thank you, but no, I’m not a workaholic, not even close. Full-time jobs scare me, because being in an office for 8 hours feels like a very long time. Longer than 8 hours is scary.

I did work for a guy whose motto was “you sleep when you die.” People like him scare me. Same goes for Jack Ma, who thinks that if you’re working 75 hours a week, you’re blessed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What’s the big deal?

The “big deal” is that they aren’t doing what is truly necessary to grow their business, and then they come here to complain that they aren’t getting sales, when all they’re doing is changing their gig images, constantly rewriting their gig descriptions, and waiting for Fiverr to make them successful.

Fiverr does not guarantee sales, so if a seller doesn’t have as many sales as they want, they are going to have to go out into the world, find the people who need their services, and convince them to hire them. Every business does this. Every business has to do this if they want to compete. It constantly baffles me how many sellers come to Fiverr, and think that the rules of business don’t apply here.

The “big deal” is that they aren’t doing what is truly necessary to grow their business, and then they come here to complain that they aren’t getting sales, when all they’re doing is changing their gig images, constantly rewriting their gig descriptions, and waiting for Fiverr to make them successful

For many buyers that’s enough to be successful and get sales. Why not tell them what to do? Why not criticize what they’re doing? That would be helpful.

Fiverr does not guarantee sales, so if a seller doesn’t have as many sales as they want, they are going to have to go out into the world, find the people who need their services, and convince them to hire them. Every business does this.

True, but most sellers on Fiverr don’t have a degree in business, nor do they treat it as a business. This is the gig economy, it’s supposed to be different here. In a traditional economy, things like order completion rates are irrelevant. An advertising agency might participate in 10 pitches and win only one client, so that’s a 10% order completion rate, and yet that client can make the agency tens of thousands of dollars, maybe millions of dollars.

My point is that it’s perfectly understandable that people get frustrated when they don’t get orders. How would you feel if you had a car dealership, and you failed to sell a single car last week?

It is a good thing that selling on Fiverr costs nothing. If people had to pay to be on Fiverr, a lot less people would be here, and plenty more would feel this is a scam. But because Fiverr only takes 20%, and only gets paid when we make money, Fiverr is loved by many.

A business on the other hand, pays rent/mortgage, utilities, might need a business license, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The “big deal” is that they aren’t doing what is truly necessary to grow their business, and then they come here to complain that they aren’t getting sales, when all they’re doing is changing their gig images, constantly rewriting their gig descriptions, and waiting for Fiverr to make them successful

For many buyers that’s enough to be successful and get sales. Why not tell them what to do? Why not criticize what they’re doing? That would be helpful.

Fiverr does not guarantee sales, so if a seller doesn’t have as many sales as they want, they are going to have to go out into the world, find the people who need their services, and convince them to hire them. Every business does this.

True, but most sellers on Fiverr don’t have a degree in business, nor do they treat it as a business. This is the gig economy, it’s supposed to be different here. In a traditional economy, things like order completion rates are irrelevant. An advertising agency might participate in 10 pitches and win only one client, so that’s a 10% order completion rate, and yet that client can make the agency tens of thousands of dollars, maybe millions of dollars.

My point is that it’s perfectly understandable that people get frustrated when they don’t get orders. How would you feel if you had a car dealership, and you failed to sell a single car last week?

It is a good thing that selling on Fiverr costs nothing. If people had to pay to be on Fiverr, a lot less people would be here, and plenty more would feel this is a scam. But because Fiverr only takes 20%, and only gets paid when we make money, Fiverr is loved by many.

A business on the other hand, pays rent/mortgage, utilities, might need a business license, etc.

For many buyers that’s enough to be successful and get sales. Why not tell them what to do? Why not criticize what they’re doing? That would be helpful.

Why not tell them what do do, you say?

Neither I, nor anyone else, are helping new sellers grow their business, by providing them with a step-by-step manual for success, just so that don’t have to take responsibility for their own learning. Fiverr want’s doers – this is why their brand tagline is, “In Doers We Trust”. Being a freelancer, means doing your own market research, figuring out how to connect with your own unique audience, and being willing to do the personalized work that leads to success.

Why not criticize what they’re doing, you say?

That is exactly what I, and other helpful veteran sellers do here on the forums. It is up to the new sellers – many of whom don’t seem to want to accept the hard truth of the advice we do share – to take responsibility for their own success. You, of all people, know that we are not here to do that for them.

most sellers on Fiverr don’t have a degree in business, nor do they treat it as a business. This is the gig economy, it’s supposed to be different here.

No, see this is where you are, most definitely wrong. Business is business, no matter where it takes place. Fiverr is not a magic website where the laws of business, and the hard work necessary to attain success don’t apply. Business on Fiverr is the same as business anywhere else. No one needs a business degree to be in business, but they do treat whatever business they choose to do AS a business.

Fiverr is a freelance business platform. Work for success is required here, just as much as it is necessary anywhere else. Fiverr does not exist to make sellers successful. Fiverr exists to support the dedicated actions of great freelancers who wish to build their own freelance business. This is why Fiverr’s search system is performance based. Work hard to be a great in-demand seller, who delivers great work, on time, and earns top-level reviews, and Fiverr usually rewards those sellers with more visibility in their search system.

The one thing sellers need to realize, though, is Fiverr rewards, they don’t provide. No one can come here, and expect success just because they are here. We all need to work for that success, and we achieve that success by being great sellers.

My point is that it’s perfectly understandable that people get frustrated when they don’t get orders.

I agree. Frustration is part of any business, but it is not Fiverr’s fault when sellers don’t gain sales. Fiverr is just a hosting platform. Gigs are always available, and open for purchase, no matter where they may or may not be in the “search rankings”. We all have profile pages that show that our public gigs are available and easily accessible. Promote those gigs. Market them. Sellers are responsible for their own success. Fiverr does not exist to make sure every seller has the sales and success that they want.

If you want to be a successful freelancer, you work hard to earn it – no matter where your gig ranks in the bonus search feature.

A business on the other hand, pays rent/mortgage, utilities, might need a business license, etc.

Yes, and the advantage of Fiverr is that you can host services here, and don’t have to pay rent, mortgage, utilities, or business licenses. You still have to do everything else – just like any business seeking to grow and become more widely known.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For many buyers that’s enough to be successful and get sales. Why not tell them what to do? Why not criticize what they’re doing? That would be helpful.

Why not tell them what do do, you say?

Neither I, nor anyone else, are helping new sellers grow their business, by providing them with a step-by-step manual for success, just so that don’t have to take responsibility for their own learning. Fiverr want’s doers – this is why their brand tagline is, “In Doers We Trust”. Being a freelancer, means doing your own market research, figuring out how to connect with your own unique audience, and being willing to do the personalized work that leads to success.

Why not criticize what they’re doing, you say?

That is exactly what I, and other helpful veteran sellers do here on the forums. It is up to the new sellers – many of whom don’t seem to want to accept the hard truth of the advice we do share – to take responsibility for their own success. You, of all people, know that we are not here to do that for them.

most sellers on Fiverr don’t have a degree in business, nor do they treat it as a business. This is the gig economy, it’s supposed to be different here.

No, see this is where you are, most definitely wrong. Business is business, no matter where it takes place. Fiverr is not a magic website where the laws of business, and the hard work necessary to attain success don’t apply. Business on Fiverr is the same as business anywhere else. No one needs a business degree to be in business, but they do treat whatever business they choose to do AS a business.

Fiverr is a freelance business platform. Work for success is required here, just as much as it is necessary anywhere else. Fiverr does not exist to make sellers successful. Fiverr exists to support the dedicated actions of great freelancers who wish to build their own freelance business. This is why Fiverr’s search system is performance based. Work hard to be a great in-demand seller, who delivers great work, on time, and earns top-level reviews, and Fiverr usually rewards those sellers with more visibility in their search system.

The one thing sellers need to realize, though, is Fiverr rewards, they don’t provide. No one can come here, and expect success just because they are here. We all need to work for that success, and we achieve that success by being great sellers.

My point is that it’s perfectly understandable that people get frustrated when they don’t get orders.

I agree. Frustration is part of any business, but it is not Fiverr’s fault when sellers don’t gain sales. Fiverr is just a hosting platform. Gigs are always available, and open for purchase, no matter where they may or may not be in the “search rankings”. We all have profile pages that show that our public gigs are available and easily accessible. Promote those gigs. Market them. Sellers are responsible for their own success. Fiverr does not exist to make sure every seller has the sales and success that they want.

If you want to be a successful freelancer, you work hard to earn it – no matter where your gig ranks in the bonus search feature.

A business on the other hand, pays rent/mortgage, utilities, might need a business license, etc.

Yes, and the advantage of Fiverr is that you can host services here, and don’t have to pay rent, mortgage, utilities, or business licenses. You still have to do everything else – just like any business seeking to grow and become more widely known.

Neither I, nor anyone else, are helping new sellers grow their business, by providing them with a step-by-step manual for success

I don’t mean that, I mean criticizing what’s obviously wrong. Correcting their spelling mistakes, advising them about gig titles, gig images, giving them gig ideas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Neither I, nor anyone else, are helping new sellers grow their business, by providing them with a step-by-step manual for success

I don’t mean that, I mean criticizing what’s obviously wrong. Correcting their spelling mistakes, advising them about gig titles, gig images, giving them gig ideas.

@jonbaas , what is the reason decrees sale ? last week sales too down ( last 2 years down), my gig ok others are all ok, but my sale down , expert comments please

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@jonbaas , what is the reason decrees sale ? last week sales too down ( last 2 years down), my gig ok others are all ok, but my sale down , expert comments please

what is the reason decrees sale …my sale down , expert comments please

Alright, my expert reason: Performance.

Your sales from the search results likely decreased because the performance of your gig(s) decreased. Improve your gig performance (see your Analytics page), and your gigs might become more visible in the search results again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what is the reason decrees sale …my sale down , expert comments please

Alright, my expert reason: Performance.

Your sales from the search results likely decreased because the performance of your gig(s) decreased. Improve your gig performance (see your Analytics page), and your gigs might become more visible in the search results again.

@jonbaas

My gig view and impression is ok , also my analytics page is ok . please suggest me how to improve my gig performance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...