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the_cable_guy

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it wouldn’t have been manually .

Then how if not manually?

How would he know the average sale price for each category? There is no way.

I don’t have packages and even so, he wouldn’t even know MY average sale price.

how if not manually?

eg. by a script, app etc. He’s also mentioned “APIs” (application programming interfaces).

How would he know the average sale price for each category? There is no way.

I don’t have packages and even so, he wouldn’t even know MY average sale price.

I think he’s just estimating based on the displayed gig price or gig package prices (so not using the actual sales price of a gig, and he doesn’t know the actual number of sales - he’ll be basing number of sales based on the number of reviews I think). So yes it wouldn’t be/isn’t accurate but he says they’re just rough figures.

edit: He said:

In order to calculate the quantity of sales for the past two months I’m using the quantity of reviews. And for the amount of sales I’m using pricing available in packages of an exact gig [ie. I think he means pricing shown in the gig/gig packages instead of the exact price sold at here]. I totally understand that reviews are not showing all the sales, and that gig price is not showing the exact amount of the sales. But my task was to compare categories. And the numbers (with this accuracy) are showing me exactly what I’ve needed.

Though when a gig has packages, whether he just averages the package prices or assumes people would mostly buy one of the cheaper packages I don’t know.

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how if not manually?

eg. by a script, app etc. He’s also mentioned “APIs” (application programming interfaces).

How would he know the average sale price for each category? There is no way.

I don’t have packages and even so, he wouldn’t even know MY average sale price.

I think he’s just estimating based on the displayed gig price or gig package prices (so not using the actual sales price of a gig, and he doesn’t know the actual number of sales - he’ll be basing number of sales based on the number of reviews I think). So yes it wouldn’t be/isn’t accurate but he says they’re just rough figures.

edit: He said:

In order to calculate the quantity of sales for the past two months I’m using the quantity of reviews. And for the amount of sales I’m using pricing available in packages of an exact gig [ie. I think he means pricing shown in the gig/gig packages instead of the exact price sold at here]. I totally understand that reviews are not showing all the sales, and that gig price is not showing the exact amount of the sales. But my task was to compare categories. And the numbers (with this accuracy) are showing me exactly what I’ve needed.

Though when a gig has packages, whether he just averages the package prices or assumes people would mostly buy one of the cheaper packages I don’t know.

Since the gigs jump around each time you refresh a page there could be no macro that would work. He would need to manually go through every single gig on the site or in a category. In other words I think it is entirely guesswork.

He said there are 25,000 sales in my category in 60 days. There is no way he would know that. Did he look at every gig in my category? I doubt it. Did he add up the number of reviews for every single gig, and do that for 60 days? I doubt it.

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Since the gigs jump around each time you refresh a page there could be no macro that would work. He would need to manually go through every single gig on the site or in a category. In other words I think it is entirely guesswork.

He said there are 25,000 sales in my category in 60 days. There is no way he would know that. Did he look at every gig in my category? I doubt it. Did he add up the number of reviews for every single gig, and do that for 60 days? I doubt it.

Since the gigs jump around each time you refresh a page there could be no macro that would work. He would need to manually go through every single gig on the site or in a category. In other words I think it is entirely guesswork.

He won’t be doing it manually (since he mentioned APIs and due to the large amount of pages that would need to be looked at/totalled). Maybe the script/app when looking at info for a category goes to that category on the site and then selects each page in sequence (for each page of them, it could also look at the page for each gig shown in the category page). Maybe he (his script) could look at the gigId (unique gig number) and total info based on those per category (ie. by using the gigId the script could know whether it had already taken account of a particular gig in the totals).

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Since the gigs jump around each time you refresh a page there could be no macro that would work. He would need to manually go through every single gig on the site or in a category. In other words I think it is entirely guesswork.

He won’t be doing it manually (since he mentioned APIs and due to the large amount of pages that would need to be looked at/totalled). Maybe the script/app when looking at info for a category goes to that category on the site and then selects each page in sequence (for each page of them, it could also look at the page for each gig shown in the category page). Maybe he (his script) could look at the gigId (unique gig number) and total info based on those per category (ie. by using the gigId the script could know whether it had already taken account of a particular gig in the totals).

@uk1000 Or maybe he guessed. No one knows and he’s not telling.

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  • 5 months later...

Well… to me, I think everything is just a guess prediction as no one know the sales volume on fiverr except fiverr itself

The number of reviews gives a good estimate for the number of orders. You could assume a standard percentage of orders get reviews or a standard percentage per category get reviews to get a rough idea of the number of orders for a gig.

Also gig and package prices can give a reasonable approximation of price per order (and 20% could be taken off due to Fiverr’s share). Though it wouldn’t let you know custom offers amounts. You could also assume, for gig packages that a certain percentage would normally buy the basic and standard package rather than the premium package, based on checking a number of existing orders (the seller doing the analysis could check their own orders). The analysis could also have an option to exclude gigs which ask to contact before ordering and/or which had packages so more accurate pricing could be determined (eg. if there’s only 1 gig price and they don’t ask to contact first, many people might order with that gig price - though gig extras might also need to be taken into account or if there were extras you could assume the estimate was a minimum and that it could be higher due to gig extras/tips).

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Guest stellathewriter

wow @the_cable_guy this is very good. What an eye opener…👍 . I am in the writing and WordPress niche and honestly the competition is really high. I am trying to see what other skills i can add to my badge… Still yet to decide, i don’t want to waste my time to learn new skills when it wont be able to fetch in good money, what then is the point?:tipping_hand_woman:

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Regardless of whether these stats are or are not legitimate, do not just jump into Fiverr full-time and expect full-time results (i.e. tons of orders, pay, etc.) — even if you do have the time and effort to put into it!

It is not a guarantee that your profile will pick up quickly, but with time (and while offering excellent, or unique, services) your profile will gain some traction. Just be sure to reply to messages quickly, but thoroughly! Be professional, respectful, and generous!

Like any sole proprietorship/freelance-related work, it’s best (for most people) to start as a hobby or income-generating activity, then let it build up appropriately. Once you have gained enough of a workload, slowly transition into it more full-time… or keep pushing if you already are!

Especially with coders/programmers… it will take time! Be patient and persistent, and hopefully you will achieve the success you are looking for!

Yes- Gig videos, great samples, and high volume keywords will also help! Just do the best you can to market yourself, and keep at it! 🙂

Best,
Alice

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  • 3 months later...

I’m tired of all those posts covering the same “find your strength” message over and over and over again without providing any new value to the community.

After studying the theory (and getting tired of all the posts like “be consistent”, “find your strengths”, “do the quality work”, “add a video”, “don’t add a video”) I switched my attention to the power of numbers and statistics.

There is a reason why many successful sellers post such messages on the forum. This is because — no matter what the statistics tell, it makes ZERO sense to offer services in a category JUST because that particular category has the “highest sales amount”.

A seller can have many skills:

  • design minimalist logos (graphics & design)
  • work as a full-stack developer/work on selenium (programming & tech)
  • write articles on cryptocurrency (writing & translation)

If they are really skilled at all 3 tasks and are capable of providing top-notch services to their clients, then sure! They can make gigs in each of these categories. They can become very successful sellers on Fiverr.

Unfortunately, many sellers look for the easiest way to make money… They don’t want to put in the hard work/effort that’s required to deliver premium quality services/products to their customers. Instead, they find the category that is making the most money (using statistics, just like you did), create some random gig in that category, and start fooling/scamming buyers by promising them excellent products/services. They end up getting poor reviews and their orders canceled by their buyers/Fiverr. In the end, they don’t make any money; they get the boot from Fiverr. What’s the point in making such gigs (in categories making the most revenue) when sellers don’t possess the requisite skills to be the best at what they do? @the_cable_guy Do you agree?

(TL;DR): Don’t create gigs in a particular category just because you see that category making the most money. If this is your intention, statistics don’t mean anything. If you are not really skilled at a particular task (“skilled” doesn’t just mean having the technical know-how; It means being really good, if not the best, at what you do), it doesn’t make much sense to create a gig that requires you to do that task. Create gigs that revolve around your skill set and you will have the best chance at making the most money you possibly can.

Good luck! ☀️

P.S: I liked the way you presented those stats. Was easy to understand and the color combinations were not harsh on the eyes. 😃

I agree with this, but there is somany people who struggle to get orders even if they are just perfect in a skill! So it should be a combination of both! That is, High demand + experienced skill!

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