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How I went from $15 earned in May to over $1000 (so far!) in June (and you can too)


joshcates
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Just curious, how have things progressed since your original post? I am a few months behind you in terms of my activity. Like you, most all of my business have been from buyer request. Are you still getting most of your business their or are you starting to see organic orders come through?

I still hound Buyer Requests, but I also see many more organic orders come through. July was an even bigger month than June for me, though August has been slow so far. Maybe it comes and goes.

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A big thanks to all the other Fiverr users who helped me along the way. I wanted to give back to the community by writing about my experience on Fiverr and how you can become successful too.

The first step is to have a good gig. Not just a gig that you know is good, but a gig that potential buyers are going to think is good. What does that involve? Proofread, spellcheck, edit. Make sure your profile is free from errors. Not everyone on Fiverr is a native English speaker, but Fiverr IS an English platform, and if you want to compete, you need to get your ideas across.

I had to research how to make a video to showcase my talents. I did. It’s not the nicest video out there, but it gets the point across quickly, so buyers know in under a minute whether they want to hire me or not. Use your face. People want to know who they’re going to deal with. If you’re using a stock photo, they’ll know right away.

Fiverr is a marketplace and not a job. Nobody owes you anything. With this in mind, I wrote my gig page to show what I can deliver to the client, and how I benefit them. After all, you’re trying to win buyers–buyers are not deposited in your lap. Be clear in your expectations of the buyer, and be clear in what you’re going to deliver. Setting expectations is the key to getting good reviews.

Speaking of good reviews: I never had to ask a buyer to leave a review, and you probably shouldn’t either. If they want to, they will. Wow them with your great service, your timely delivery, and your professional demeanor. None of that sir/ma’am crap. They don’t like that. Talk to them like a person. Don’t call them dear. Though clients may use a casual tone with me in messages, I am always professional with them. You’re the expert. You’re the professional. Show it. Live it. Let them know by the way you act that you know what you’re doing.

And speaking of knowing what you’re doing, don’t undersell yourself. I struggle with this. Many kind and talented people on the forums helped me evaluate the worth of my service (big shoutout to @voiceofmichael for taking the time to critique me) so that I could sell myself properly. Fiverr is not a race to the bottom. If you’re only worth $5 (or the amount of time you’re selling yourself for is genuinely worth $5) then don’t be afraid to market yourself that way. But when you’re good and you know it, stand firm in your higher price. Buyers will be intrigued.

I got my start by trawling buyer requests. I was patient. I waited. I applied to every job I was qualified for with a unique and professional greeting that showcased how I would benefit the buyer and why they should choose me. Don’t use a cookie cutter template. They’ll know right away, and they won’t appreciate it. $800 of my >$1,000 have come from buyer requests. Don’t knock them. There are people who post on that board who are really looking for good service and willing to pay for it, but you have to be patient. Remember, Fiverr is a marketplace and you aren’t owed anything.

The hardest part was starting. Getting visibility. Getting those early ratings. Did I sell myself short and bend over backwards for jerk buyers that expected the moon on a stick? Yeah, I did, and you know what? I’m glad I did. I’m glad I worked too hard for too little to get the first five or six five-star reviews from satisfied clients on my gig that put me on the map. You have to give a little to get a little, and that’s okay. But you don’t have to stay there forever.

The forums are your biggest resource. They are filled with other passionate, talented professionals who want to see you succeed, but let me repeat something I’ve said several times already: nobody owes you anything. Don’t come to the forums acting like you’re owed help, you’re owed sales, you’re owed anything. You aren’t. Show some respect and it’ll be returned to you in spades. Reach out to other professionals on the forums. Ask them respectfully for their advice, if they’re willing to give it. Show that you’re trying. Ask how you can improve. Always strive for excellence. Don’t sit and wait. Do. Fiverr is a community of doers.

Get out there. Apply yourself. Be professional. Put your best foot forward. Do. No excuses. No complaints. When you hit an obstacle, you are surrounded by other people who have hit the same obstacles and will be willing to share their wisdom if you ask politely.

I can’t wait to see what July will bring not only me, but the rest of the talented people on Fiverr who are out there doing right now. Godspeed.

Great post!

Thanks for sharing this!

😎

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A big thanks to all the other Fiverr users who helped me along the way. I wanted to give back to the community by writing about my experience on Fiverr and how you can become successful too.

The first step is to have a good gig. Not just a gig that you know is good, but a gig that potential buyers are going to think is good. What does that involve? Proofread, spellcheck, edit. Make sure your profile is free from errors. Not everyone on Fiverr is a native English speaker, but Fiverr IS an English platform, and if you want to compete, you need to get your ideas across.

I had to research how to make a video to showcase my talents. I did. It’s not the nicest video out there, but it gets the point across quickly, so buyers know in under a minute whether they want to hire me or not. Use your face. People want to know who they’re going to deal with. If you’re using a stock photo, they’ll know right away.

Fiverr is a marketplace and not a job. Nobody owes you anything. With this in mind, I wrote my gig page to show what I can deliver to the client, and how I benefit them. After all, you’re trying to win buyers–buyers are not deposited in your lap. Be clear in your expectations of the buyer, and be clear in what you’re going to deliver. Setting expectations is the key to getting good reviews.

Speaking of good reviews: I never had to ask a buyer to leave a review, and you probably shouldn’t either. If they want to, they will. Wow them with your great service, your timely delivery, and your professional demeanor. None of that sir/ma’am crap. They don’t like that. Talk to them like a person. Don’t call them dear. Though clients may use a casual tone with me in messages, I am always professional with them. You’re the expert. You’re the professional. Show it. Live it. Let them know by the way you act that you know what you’re doing.

And speaking of knowing what you’re doing, don’t undersell yourself. I struggle with this. Many kind and talented people on the forums helped me evaluate the worth of my service (big shoutout to @voiceofmichael for taking the time to critique me) so that I could sell myself properly. Fiverr is not a race to the bottom. If you’re only worth $5 (or the amount of time you’re selling yourself for is genuinely worth $5) then don’t be afraid to market yourself that way. But when you’re good and you know it, stand firm in your higher price. Buyers will be intrigued.

I got my start by trawling buyer requests. I was patient. I waited. I applied to every job I was qualified for with a unique and professional greeting that showcased how I would benefit the buyer and why they should choose me. Don’t use a cookie cutter template. They’ll know right away, and they won’t appreciate it. $800 of my >$1,000 have come from buyer requests. Don’t knock them. There are people who post on that board who are really looking for good service and willing to pay for it, but you have to be patient. Remember, Fiverr is a marketplace and you aren’t owed anything.

The hardest part was starting. Getting visibility. Getting those early ratings. Did I sell myself short and bend over backwards for jerk buyers that expected the moon on a stick? Yeah, I did, and you know what? I’m glad I did. I’m glad I worked too hard for too little to get the first five or six five-star reviews from satisfied clients on my gig that put me on the map. You have to give a little to get a little, and that’s okay. But you don’t have to stay there forever.

The forums are your biggest resource. They are filled with other passionate, talented professionals who want to see you succeed, but let me repeat something I’ve said several times already: nobody owes you anything. Don’t come to the forums acting like you’re owed help, you’re owed sales, you’re owed anything. You aren’t. Show some respect and it’ll be returned to you in spades. Reach out to other professionals on the forums. Ask them respectfully for their advice, if they’re willing to give it. Show that you’re trying. Ask how you can improve. Always strive for excellence. Don’t sit and wait. Do. Fiverr is a community of doers.

Get out there. Apply yourself. Be professional. Put your best foot forward. Do. No excuses. No complaints. When you hit an obstacle, you are surrounded by other people who have hit the same obstacles and will be willing to share their wisdom if you ask politely.

I can’t wait to see what July will bring not only me, but the rest of the talented people on Fiverr who are out there doing right now. Godspeed.

Great one brother hope this never stops and increases into 5 digits.

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giphy

I’m tellin’ you the beard is your lucky

On a serious note:

Josh, I really admire your enthusiasm, your growth & your positivity. Not mention you come across as a very a humble soul. I’m really excited for you and I’m sure July will be even better. 🎊

Don’t come to the forums acting like you’re owed help, you’re owed sales, you’re owed anything. You aren’t. Show some respect and it’ll be returned to you in spades. Reach out to other professionals on the forums. Ask them respectfully for their advice, if they’re willing to give it. Show that you’re trying. Ask how you can improve. Always strive for excellence. Don’t sit and wait. Do . Fiverr is a community of doers.

Many come to the forum to moan about this or that, but they don’t want to put in the work, they want to take shortcuts. It’s also refreshing to see a user ask Qs or for help in a polite & respectful manner. These users take the advice and apply them accordingly. Then a few weeks/months later… When I see them share an inspiring story like yours it puts a smile on my face. 🙂

Cheers! 🍹

Not mention you come across as a very a humble soul

Nicest compliment that i see here and indeed these are very informative.

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