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😠 Does Fiverr monitor these groups?


sydneymorgan

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Unfortunately, it does happen. It also comes with the risk of one party being scammed. Do I (account seller) give you access codes before the sale? How can I be sure you wouldn’t make a move to change the password and say you won’t deal again? Do I (account buyer) wait until I’ve made the payment before demanding the codes? How am I certain I would be given actual working codes? Whom do I ask when I’m not?

It’s an endless list of questions. But I believe many have found a way to get the deals through the line successfully. Maybe, two sincere sellers who really want to deal? Idk…

You can presume that the ethics of both parties are not 100% stellar from the start.

The transaction is against the rules of fiverr, so I would think that it would be an easy way to have people send you money and give them nothing in return. Who would the buyer complain to?

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You can presume that the ethics of both parties are not 100% stellar from the start.

The transaction is against the rules of fiverr, so I would think that it would be an easy way to have people send you money and give them nothing in return. Who would the buyer complain to?

To the forum! Ala: I’ve just been scammed by a Fiverr seller (with very sketchy details). Or, if the seller was unsuccessful and was scammed instead: “I don’t know how but all of my money has been transferred from my account…” I say, they all get what they deserve. Whether or not it was successful, I’d want to believe that both parties live to regret it. Maybe I’m wrong, though.

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In my opinion, Fiverr does a lot. They constantly try to improve the buyer’s experience. A seller is dependent of buyers. If there aren’t any more buyers, there’s no profit. It’s clever to focus on the buyer’s side since every sincere seller can make it and will last way longer than a scammer. Pursuing groups of disrespectful and fraudulent sellers over the web would be a huge loss. It’s better to work on the internal ecosystem itself.

However, I disagree with showing the amount earned. I’m working on several platforms and offsite via own websites. On places, where prospects can see your rates, they’ll begin to discuss pricing sooner. Let’s say you’ll raise your prices, prospects will see what clients paid you before this event and may ask. That’s just unnecessary and annoying. Same goes for different rating colors.

I think it might be interesting to implement a “level 3” seller or a requirement to stay “level 2”. Many accounts are level 2 but inactive since months or years. I think that there could be some steps before a downgrade, e.g. an e-mail asking whether you’re still active, a reminder three months ago, etc.
With a level 3 status, there might be more problems since a 3-level-system is way better than a 4-level-sytem from my perspective. Especially for the buyers and the balance between TRS and new sellers.

As for the problem with many different orders, this is something they could solve, though. Manually checking every multiple gig order would be insane, rather a max. review option could be the solution.

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I can’t think of how someone would sell a fiverr account technically. Let’s say it’s for sale for $1000 and someone sends you the money for it. What is to keep you from not giving it to them? Who would they complain to? How do you prove you are the actual owner of the account?

What if the country is different? Then there is the matter of security questions and passwords.

The whole procedure doesn’t seem possible to me.

That’s the issue. People pretend they are selling a TRS account and in reality they don’t own the account but rather they are scamming you.

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That’s the issue. People pretend they are selling a TRS account and in reality they don’t own the account but rather they are scamming you.

People who are getting scammed on sites or groups like this should never dare to complain. If they go on sites like these, they shouldn’t expect less than getting scammed.

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Ratings should be weighted in some form. A 1-star review on a $5 order shouldn’t mean as much as a 5-star review on a $500 order.

I think just putting the order total next to the review would be acceptable and very beneficial.

When someone first suggested this, I thought buyers might not like it for privacy reasons. But then again, all other platforms usually show (1) the price of each sale, along with (2) how much revenue each seller has made. It could lead to a better picture of performance and reliability, especially if buyers knew each seller’s total amount of completed orders and revenue.

Ratings should be weighted in some form. A 1-star review on a $5 order shouldn’t mean as much as a 5-star review on a $500 order.

I think just putting the order total next to the review would be acceptable and very beneficial.

It certainly would be nice if there was some weighting. My three 1 star ratings where on two $5 gigs, and one $10 gig. All three of those were after 1800 ratings that were 5 star.

That said, I just respond and move on. The one thing that solves issues is getting more orders.

One other thing: That rating is external. It may have one or two buyers skip over me, but if they don’t realize “there is one in every crowd” I suspect I don’t want them as a buyer.

My real concern is when it hurts in the rankings. I am sure it does NOT if you have plenty of high ratings. Plus I suspect the internal surveys hold far more weight (I can’t prove that, but based on other things I’ve seen…)

If you have some raving fans on the internal survey (from your 5 star clients) I suspect that totally mitigates the few “out of norm” low ratings.

Not fun when it happens, but life in an open market.

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Ratings should be weighted in some form. A 1-star review on a $5 order shouldn’t mean as much as a 5-star review on a $500 order.

I think just putting the order total next to the review would be acceptable and very beneficial.

It certainly would be nice if there was some weighting. My three 1 star ratings where on two $5 gigs, and one $10 gig. All three of those were after 1800 ratings that were 5 star.

That said, I just respond and move on. The one thing that solves issues is getting more orders.

One other thing: That rating is external. It may have one or two buyers skip over me, but if they don’t realize “there is one in every crowd” I suspect I don’t want them as a buyer.

My real concern is when it hurts in the rankings. I am sure it does NOT if you have plenty of high ratings. Plus I suspect the internal surveys hold far more weight (I can’t prove that, but based on other things I’ve seen…)

If you have some raving fans on the internal survey (from your 5 star clients) I suspect that totally mitigates the few “out of norm” low ratings.

Not fun when it happens, but life in an open market.

I think just putting the order total next to the review would be acceptable and very beneficial.

You cannot be telling everyone who sees your reviews how much people spent!

That’s private. Imagine the anger if people paid two different amounts for the same gig, trying to calm them down and explain it constantly. 😱

One person paid $100 for a gig and another paid $5 for the same gig? I don’t think that’s a smart idea to be publishing that information.

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