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Communicating the Value of Your Gig to Buyers - UPYOUR


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“But Eoin, my clients all just don´t read any messages I send them either! Also, where I live there´s a lottery draw three times a week!” image.png.f8020e68ab9b386a075f911980e2ecac.png

Nice article, thanks, I do that sometimes, but probably could work on it.

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Man, you do a lot of thinking. If I was a new seller I would get scared by this UPYOUR process. My strategy was simple - do a great job, sell at a low price, talk politely to buyers, and deliver on time as far as possible. Spend the rest of your time worrying about the future of India. That’s it.

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Man, you do a lot of thinking. If I was a new seller I would get scared by this UPYOUR process. My strategy was simple - do a great job, sell at a low price, talk politely to buyers, and deliver on time as far as possible. Spend the rest of your time worrying about the future of India. That’s it.

you do a lot of thinking. If I was a new seller I would get scared by this UPYOUR process

Yes, I probably over-think things quite a bit too but the reality is that freelancing is not easy but all the blogs, courses, advertisements make it sound like it is just a matter of signing up to make money and that is simply not the case.

For new sellers, unless they are VERY lucky and get a first page rank for a considerable time (like a year+) they are going to struggle if they are financially dependent on Fiverr/other platforms. For some sellers, the ones we hear about in promos etc, they have been fortunate, got in at the right time and/or worked damn hard to get their success but the hard work element is generally mentioned in a throwaway line and the reality of it is not emphasized in the same way that their “6/7-figure-income” is bandied about.

do a great job, sell at a low price, talk politely to buyers, and deliver on time as far as possible

Don’t undersell yourself and your achievements. You work exceptionally hard to maintain your buyers and deliver as much as you do at the price you do. For many, working the hours you do is just not feasible and so other methods and strategies must be implemented. Also, your current income rate probably didn’t start at that 3 years ago and as much as a TRS badge is not a guarantee of continued success, it definitely helps to a point.

I actually find it comforting to know that my success is in my own hands and not reliant on a company I have no real relationship with and so should other/new sellers. They don’t have to just take a ticket and hope for the best, unless that is all they are prepared to do.

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you do a lot of thinking. If I was a new seller I would get scared by this UPYOUR process

Yes, I probably over-think things quite a bit too but the reality is that freelancing is not easy but all the blogs, courses, advertisements make it sound like it is just a matter of signing up to make money and that is simply not the case.

For new sellers, unless they are VERY lucky and get a first page rank for a considerable time (like a year+) they are going to struggle if they are financially dependent on Fiverr/other platforms. For some sellers, the ones we hear about in promos etc, they have been fortunate, got in at the right time and/or worked damn hard to get their success but the hard work element is generally mentioned in a throwaway line and the reality of it is not emphasized in the same way that their “6/7-figure-income” is bandied about.

do a great job, sell at a low price, talk politely to buyers, and deliver on time as far as possible

Don’t undersell yourself and your achievements. You work exceptionally hard to maintain your buyers and deliver as much as you do at the price you do. For many, working the hours you do is just not feasible and so other methods and strategies must be implemented. Also, your current income rate probably didn’t start at that 3 years ago and as much as a TRS badge is not a guarantee of continued success, it definitely helps to a point.

I actually find it comforting to know that my success is in my own hands and not reliant on a company I have no real relationship with and so should other/new sellers. They don’t have to just take a ticket and hope for the best, unless that is all they are prepared to do.

Actually, my earnings were high from the very start; and have remained consistent throughout. I have talked about my story enough here, so will just be repeating things…in my first 2 years, I did over a hundred orders every month…was placed high on search, in the first page itself. For much of my third year, I have been on 4th or 5th pages, relied entirely on repeat orders- bigger orders, higher delivery time. I think there is no one model that works for everyone, all of us have to find our own path to our kind of success. Fiverr gives everyone an equal chance - new, old, TRS, non-TRS, it’s up to the person to take it.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Oh, talking about VALUE, I remember my 3rd order on Fiverr. For it, I had to search 99 images and make a graphic of them… for guess how much? For $5. I underestimated the value of my work and did the work for SUCH A CHEAP rate.

Well, the buyer ended up saying: This is not what I wanted and I don’t think you will be able to do what I want.

Thankfully, had gone through the forum by then and asked the buyer to cancel the order instead of giving a negative review (it was my 3rd order and could have badly influenced my overall ratings).

I learned the hard way about the value of my work. And this forum really helps a great deal in this regard.

Also, three cheers for Eoin. You are doing a superb job helping us.

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  • 2 years later...

Hi Eoin,

I’ve been reading all your lovely advice and thank you!
I’m a definite newbie on here, and I have a LOT to work on for my gig (as I’m finding out), at first Fiverr is pretty overwhelming, so thank god for these forums. The people on here, especially your stuff Eoin, have been so helpful and inspiring. It’s always hard starting from the ground up somewhere, but you guys make it a lot easier!!

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  • 3 years later...

Charging what you are worth is essential. It is not being greedy. 

Whenever you charge your worth, you find yourself motivated to do a great job and to deliver on time. In fact, you tend to be happier.

Do you have any bad experience with charging peanuts? Please share.

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1 hour ago, leannelrivers said:

tend to be some of the most difficult and unreasonable people to work with. 

100%

A recent message I received...

'I'll pay you $20 for a 1 hour call but only if the advice makes my business profitable. If it is profitable in 6 months I will pay you $20. Do you guarantee it?'

🤦‍♂️

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1 hour ago, leannelrivers said:

Clients who expect work for peanuts and only offer peanuts can tend to be some of the most difficult and unreasonable people to work with. 

I agree. And there are even worse poeple than that, those who offer peanuts and ask for a discount. That's a special breed 😄

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3 hours ago, grayprogrammerz said:

For an expert, work becomes too easy. So they finish in some minutes without any headche.

 

This does depend on what you do, I think. Writing still takes roughly the same (if not more time with editing/etc.) for me than before. Have I improved? Absolutely. But I wouldn't say my work is 'too easy'. 

11 minutes ago, donnovan86 said:

I agree. And there are even worse poeple than that, those who offer peanuts and ask for a discount. That's a special breed 😄

Some people can't help it... they mistake sellers for elephants 😛
(jokes aside, raising my prices helped this to SOME extent, but not... fully. I often wish I could take on fun projects that would pay me less, but it just wouldn't be profitable for me, so I end up having to say no)

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1 hour ago, katakatica said:

This does depend on what you do, I think. Writing still takes roughly the same (if not more time with editing/etc.) for me than before. Have I improved? Absolutely. But I wouldn't say my work is 'too easy'.

May be every time you get completely new situation or article to write ?

For me, most of my work is bit similar to what I been doing previous 4 years.

Yeah its hard at first. But when it become daily routine it keeps on easing level: hardest > hard > easy > too easy...

Rest I refrain from experiments, specially if outcomes are small. 😄

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For years I believed that the most successful freelancers were smarter than everyone else.

After meetings with hundreds of successful freelancers and freelance coaches, I can tell you that they’re not smarter.

They’re just good at selling themselves.👍

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/28/2023 at 6:42 AM, leannelrivers said:

Clients who expect work for peanuts and only offer peanuts can tend to be some of the most difficult and unreasonable people to work with. 

Agreed! Whereas clients that spend a reasonable amount of money and don't nickle and dime you are always grateful and most of the time very easy to work with. It's better to charge what you are worth and not less than that. If you don't value your work then no one else will value it either. 

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